Popular Alpha News and Current Events

Popular Alpha News and Current Events, Alpha News Articles.
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WSU researchers discover new clues on how sleep works in the brain
Star-shaped brain cells called astrocytes appear to play an essential role in sleep, a new study by scientists from the Washington State University Sleep and Performance Research Center confirms. Published today in PLOS Genetics, their study shows that astrocytes communicate to neurons to regulate sleep time in fruit flies and suggests it may do the same in mammals, including humans. (2018-10-31)

Electrons use DNA like a wire for signaling DNA replication
A Caltech-led study has shown that the electrical wire-like behavior of DNA is involved in the molecule's replication. (2017-02-23)

Antioxidants and lung cancer risk
An epidemiological study published in Frontiers in Oncology suggests that a diet high in carotenoids and vitamin C may protect against lung cancer. The study authors found that vitamin C appears to reduce the risk of lung cancer in heavy smokers while beta-carotene, alpha-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, and lycopene play the same role in male heavy smokers. (2017-03-08)

Alpha-ray missile therapy: tumor cells attacked from intracellular region
Researchers from Osaka University have innovated a technique of irradiating cancer from within. They tagged α-methyl-L-tyrosine with 211Astatine, an α-emitter, to prepare 211At-AAMT; this radiopharmaceutical was effectively conveyed into cancer cells by the amino acid transporter LAT1. Alpha radiation combines high linear energy transfer with minimal tissue penetration, damaging cancer cells lethally while sparing surrounding normal tissue. This strategy may prove a breakthrough in the management of intractable or advanced cancers. (2021-01-04)

Researchers shed light on why exercise slows progression of Parkinson's disease
While vigorous exercise on a treadmill has been shown to slow the progression of Parkinson's disease in patients, the molecular reasons behind it have remained a mystery. (2017-12-22)

Camelina oil improves blood lipid profile
The use of camelina oil reduces overall and LDL cholesterol levels in persons with impaired glucose metabolism, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. The findings were published in Molecular Nutrition & Food Research. (2018-01-08)

Scientists find new evidence about how to prevent worsening pneumonia
Sodium channels in the cells that line the tiny capillaries in our lungs play an important role in keeping those capillaries from leaking and potentially worsening conditions like pneumonia, scientists report. (2017-09-05)

New targeted alpha therapy protocol for advanced prostate cancer
Therapy options are limited for men with advanced-stage, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, but a new treatment protocol offers hope. In the featured article of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine's October issue, German researchers report on their novel dosing regimen for actinium-225-labeled targeted alpha therapy of patients with prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-positive tumors. The protocol balances treatment response with toxicity concerns to provide the most effective therapy with the least side effects. (2017-10-03)

Bariatric surgery successes lead to type 2 diabetes treatment
Bariatric surgery has long yielded almost immediate health benefits for patients with type 2 diabetes, and new findings from Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine may be the key to developing drug alternatives to surgery. (2018-04-24)

Are planets setting the sun's pace?
The sun's activity is determined by the sun's magnetic field. Two combined effects are responsible for the latter: the omega and the alpha effect. Exactly where and how the alpha effect originates is currently unknown. Researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf are putting forward a new theory for this in the journal Solar Physics. Their calculations suggest that tidal forces from Venus, the Earth and Jupiter can directly influence the sun's activity. (2016-10-04)

Blood test plus ultrasound boosts liver cancer detection by 40 percent
Combining ultrasound imaging with a blood test for high alpha fetoprotein (AFP) levels improves detection of early-stage liver cancer by as much as 40 percent, researchers at UT Southwestern's Simmons Cancer Center found. (2018-02-09)

Smart molecules trigger white blood cells to become better cancer-eating machines
A team of researchers has engineered smart protein molecules that can reprogram white blood cells to ignore a self-defense signaling mechanism that cancer cells use to survive and spread in the body. Researchers say the advance could lead to a new method of re-engineering immune cells to fight cancer and infectious diseases. The team successfully tested this method in a live cell culture system. (2017-09-28)

Our bodies may cure themselves of diabetes in the future
Our bodies may cure themselves of diabetes in the future. (2019-01-04)

Fat cells seem to remember unhealthy diet
Fat cells can be damaged in a short amount of time when they are exposed to the fatty acid palmitate or the hormone TNF-alpha through a fatty diet, a new study shows. The researchers from Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research hope this new knowledge may be used to develop new preventive strategies for diabetes. (2018-04-20)

The search for the holy grail: Promising strategies for slowing, stopping, or reversing Parkinson's disease
Understanding of the processes involved in Parkinson's disease (PD) degeneration has vastly improved over the last 20 years. In this insightful review, published in the special supplement to the Journal of Parkinson's Disease, experts consider which of the existing strategies to slow down or stop the degenerative processes of PD are most likely to be successful over the next 20 years. (2019-02-12)

'Social brain' networks are altered at a young age in autism
As infants develop, they respond to social cues such as voices, faces and gestures. Their brain develops a network of regions that specialise in translating these cues, the 'social brain'. A common observation in infants later diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders is reduced sensitivity towards these social cues. A team of researchers from the University of Geneva brings evidence of how this phenomenon hinders the normal development of the social brain at early developmental stages. (2018-02-27)

Hormone links sleep, hunger and metabolism, researchers find
While investigating how the hormone orexin might control sleep and hunger, researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have discovered, to their surprise, that it activates a protein, HIF-1, long known to stimulate cancerous tumor growth. (2007-11-14)

Red sky at night -- astronomers delight
A collaboration of over 50 astronomers, The IPHAS consortium, led from the UK, with partners in Europe, USA, Australia, has released today (Dec. 10, 2007) the first comprehensive optical digital survey of our own Milky Way. Conducted by looking at light emitted by hydrogen ions, using the Isaac Newton Telescope on La Palma, the survey contains stunning red images of nebulae and stars. (2007-12-10)

A biological mechanism for depression
Researchers report that in depressed individuals there are increased amounts of an unmodified structural protein, called tubulin, in lipid rafts compared with non-depressed individuals. (2020-04-21)

Compound regulates genetic risk factor in Parkinson's disease
Suchi Mittal and colleagues have identified beta-2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR) agonists as compounds that can reduce levels of the alpha-synuclein gene, which has been implicated in increased risk for Parkinson's disease. (2017-08-31)

A highly sensitive and multi-analytical system for hereditary kidney disease
Alport syndrome (AS) is a hereditary kidney disease caused by protein (collagen) abnormalities. Unfortunately, treatment through the correction of collagen functionality has not yet been developed. Now, Japanese researchers have established a method to assess collagen complex integrity in AS, making it possible to develop therapeutic drugs. This detection system reduces labor and time costs compared to conventional methods, and can monitor type IV collagen functionality with high sensitivity. (2018-03-09)

Breast cancer study predicts better response to chemotherapy
It is known from previous research that the ER-beta estrogen receptor often has a protective effect. A new study from Lund University in Sweden has found that this effect is more pronounced in patients that undergo chemotherapy. (2016-12-15)

Blocking one receptor could halt rheumatoid arthritis
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine have shown for the first time how the activation of a receptor provokes the inflammation and bone degradation of rheumatoid arthritis -- and that activation of this one receptor, found on cells in the fluid of arthritic joints, is all that is required. (2014-09-10)

Dr. Patricia K. Coyle, multiple sclerosis clinician and researcher to lecture on DMTs
Optimal use of disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) may be one of the single most important clinical decisions made in treating multiple sclerosis (MS). Currently, there are numerous DMT options and selection can be a complex issue for the clinician and patient. Patricia K. Coyle, M.D., FAAN, FANA, Director, MS Comprehensive Care Center, Stony Brook University Medical Center, will present the Donald Paty Memorial Lecture at the CMSC Annual Meeting on 'DMT-Debates - Stopping, Switching, Re-starting.' (2018-04-05)

Nitrogen gets in the fast lane for chemical synthesis
A new one-step method discovered by synthetic organic chemists at Rice University allows nitrogen atoms to be added to precursor compounds used in the design and manufacture of drugs, pesticides, fertilizers and other products. (2019-02-08)

UA Cancer Center research team explores anti-breast cancer properties of soy
Genistein, a major compound in soy foods, might aid in the proper functioning of a gene that can malfunction to cause breast cancer. A UA Cancer Center team is exploring the gene's potential to treat a form of breast cancer and help prevent the disease. (2017-10-30)

Cancer vaccines need to target T cells that can persist in the long fight against cancer
Cancer vaccines may need to better target T cells that can hold up to the long fight against cancer, scientists report. Studies of two T cell types that are equally activated by alpha-fetoprotein, a well-established antigen made by liver cancer, show that while one starts off with a bang, the other endures as the more powerful tumor fighter. (2017-09-25)

The secret sulfate code that lets the bad Tau in
Researchers at the UT Southwestern Medical Center have uncovered details of how cells invite inside corrupted proteins that can turn normal proteins corrupt, leading to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Understanding the molecular details of how these proteins spread from cell to cell could lead to therapies to halt disease progression. (2018-07-13)

Tungsten 'too brittle' for nuclear fusion reactors
Researchers find tungsten -- a favored choice of metal within the reactor -- is liable to become brittle, leading to failure. (2018-04-13)

North-star perspectives for Actinium-225 production at commercial scale
Resolution of both supply and cost issues allows clinical research to proceed through clinical trials and potentially produce one or more effective therapies for cancer or infectious diseases that could benefit the public.NorthStar Medical Technologies, LLC, has investigated several routes that could lead to commercial scale production of actinium-225.The outlook for future supplies of actinium-225 from multiple sources to support clinical needs is encouraging. (2018-12-21)

Tracing the path of Parkinson's disease proteins
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have developed a set of tools to observe, monitor and quantify how misfolded proteins associated with Parkinson's disease enter neurons in laboratory cultures and what happens to them once they're inside. (2017-08-04)

Clarifying the plasma oscillation by high-energy particles
The National Institute for Fusion Science has developed a new code that can simulate the movement of plasma and, simultaneously, the movement of particles circulating at high speeds. In LHD we have investigated those plasma oscillations induced by high-energy particles. As research results, together with replicating the data obtained from the experiments, we have clarified the details of oscillations that cannot be measured by experiments and the interaction of high-energy particles and their oscillations. (2016-11-24)

A sustained and controllable insulin release system
Researchers from Kumamoto University, Japan have developed an insulin release system with sustained and controllable delivery. The system combines two original technologies, SPRA and PPRX, which provide complimentary benefits for insulin delivery. (2017-02-27)

Scientists discover new 'boat' form of promising semiconductor GeSe
Princeton researchers have discovered a new form of the simple compound GeSe that has surprisingly escaped detection until now. This so-called beta-GeSe compound has a ring type structure like graphene and could have similarly valuable properties for electronic applications. (2017-03-21)

Matching up fruit flies, mushroom toxins and human health
Some fruit flies build up tolerance to the toxin alpha-amanitin; the genetic mechanisms behind this adaptation link to an important metabolic pathway. A team from Michigan Technological University used genome-wide association mapping to draw the connections for 180 fruit fly lines. (2017-02-27)

New pheromone insight may help predict mountain pine beetle outbreaks
Researchers at the University of British Columbia have shed new light on how mountain pine beetles produce an important pheromone called trans-verbenol, which could aid in efforts to better predict outbreaks. (2018-03-19)

Molecule reduces accumulation of toxic protein in Parkinson's disease model
The discovery supports GM1 ganglioside as a potential target for Parkinson's therapy. (2019-07-24)

Study links type of blood pressure medication to increased variability and higher risk of death
Two types of blood pressure medications -- alpha blockers and alpha 2 agonist -- show increased variability in blood pressure measurements between doctor visits, which is associated with an increased risk of death, according to new research from the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City. (2018-03-12)

Cricket females choose male losers
According to popular belief, females prefer males with high social status (alpha males) when as partners to continue the race. However, as recent studies have shown, males losing fights have equal or even greater chances of success among females. The study was published in Frontiers of Ecology and Evolution. (2019-02-08)

Eating more fish could prevent Parkinson's disease
Parvalbumin, a protein found in great quantities in several different fish species, has been shown to help prevent the formation of certain protein structures closely associated with Parkinson's disease. A new study from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, shines more light on the link between consumption of fish and better long-term neurological health. (2018-04-23)

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