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Popular Amino Acid News and Current Events, Amino Acid News Articles.
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Choose Omega-3s from fish over flax for cancer prevention, study finds
Omega-3s from fish pack a stronger punch than flaxseed and other oils when it comes to cancer prevention, according to a first-ever University of Guelph study. (2018-01-26)

Ancient anti-inflammatory drug salicylic acid has cancer-fighting properties
Scientists from the Gladstone Institutes have identified a new pathway by which salicylic acid -- a key compound in the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs aspirin and diflunisal -- stops inflammation and tumor growth in cancer. Both salicylic acid and diflunisal suppress two key proteins that help control gene expression throughout the body. By inhibiting these proteins, the two drugs block the activation of other proteins involved in inflammation and cell growth, including one linked to leukemia. (2016-05-31)

Camelina oil improves blood lipid profile
The use of camelina oil reduces overall and LDL cholesterol levels in persons with impaired glucose metabolism, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. The findings were published in Molecular Nutrition & Food Research. (2018-01-08)

En route to custom-designed natural products
Microorganisms often assemble natural products similar to industrial assembly lines. Certain enzymes, non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) play a key role in this process. Biotechnologists at Goethe University have now been able to discover how these enzymes interact with each other. This brings them one step closer to their goal of engineering the production of such peptide natural products. (2018-10-19)

Vitamin C in the body can be tracked by fluorescence
A Japanese research team led by The University of Tokyo's Institute of Industrial Science bio-imaged vitamin C in mice. A probe chemical emitted red fluorescent light after reacting with vitamin C in the mice's bloodstream. When a dose of exogenous vitamin C was injected, it accumulated in vital organs. This is the first bioimaging of vitamin C in living tissue, showing high sensitivity and good selectivity, paving the way toward the use of this vitamin to treat cancer. (2018-01-24)

A fat-regulating enzyme could hold the key to obesity, diabetes, cancer, other diseases
It had already been known that the enzyme known as phosphatidic acid phosphatase plays a crucial role in regulating the amount of fat in the human body. Controlling it is therefore of interest in the fight against obesity. But scientists at Rutgers University-New Brunswick have now found that getting rid of the enzyme entirely can increase the risk of cancer, inflammation and other ills. Their findings were published online in the Journal of Biological Chemistry last month. (2017-09-18)

A new way to atomically thin materials
Metallic conductivity and hydrophilicity of MXenes have established them as electrodes in rechargeable batteries and supercapacitors, as well as other applications, including photothermal cancer therapy, electromagnetic shielding, water purification and gas sensing. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, researchers have now introduced a new production method. Instead of using conventional, yet more expensive, titanium aluminum carbide, they selectively etch silicon out of titanium silicon carbide, a cheaper and more common precursor, to synthesize titanium carbide. (2018-04-04)

Protein research: The computer as microscope
Using a combination of infrared spectroscopy and computer simulation, researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have gained new insights into the workings of protein switches. With high temporal and spatial resolution, they verified that a magnesium atom contributes significantly to switching the so-called G-proteins on and off. (2017-01-16)

Most dog treats exceed recommended daily energy allowance
Most commercially available dog treats contain a range of undefined ingredients, including sugars, and often exceed the recommended daily energy allowance for treats ('complementary feed'), warn researchers in the Vet Record today. (2017-12-20)

Exposure to benzene during pregnancy: a pilot study raises concerns in British Columbia
Université de Montréal research reveals that 29 pregnant women living near natural-gas hydraulic fracturing sites had a median concentration of a benzene biomarker in their urine that was 3.5 times higher than that found in women from the general Canadian population. (2017-11-13)

Nanozymes -- efficient antidote against pesticides
Members of the Faculty of Chemistry of the Lomonosov Moscow State University have developed novel nanosized agents -- nanozymes, which could be used as efficient protective and antidote modalities against the impact of neurotoxic organophosphorous compounds: pesticides and chemical warfare agents. (2017-03-07)

Communication via calcium wave
The hormone auxin is a key regulator of plant growth and development. But how it sets these processes in motion has been unclear. Scientists from the University of Würzburg have now uncovered central details. (2018-03-28)

Compounds restore antibiotics' efficacy against MRSA
Antibiotics rendered useless by the notorious methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, (MRSA) may get a second life, thanks to compounds that can restore the bug's susceptibility to antibiotics, according to a new study in mice. (2016-03-09)

Polyunsaturated fatty acids linked to reduced allergy risk
New research from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden reveals that high levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids in children's blood are associated with a reduced risk of asthma or rhinitis at the age of 16 years. The study is published in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. (2017-12-05)

Blood test for specific metabolites could reveal blocked arteries
A Duke Health pilot project suggests that in the near future, a blood test could show whether arteries carrying blood to the heart are narrow or blocked, a risk factor for heart disease. (2019-02-01)

Weathering rates for mined lands exponentially higher than unmined sites
A new study found a dramatic increase in the chemical weathering rates of mined landscapes, which are melting away bedrock up to 45 times faster than unmined areas. The weathering has global consequences for the cycling of sulfur, a key nutrient for all life forms. (2018-09-25)

Keeping the hydrogen coming
A coating of molybdenum improves the efficiency of catalysts for producing hydrogen. (2017-06-06)

Acid rain has a disproportionate impact on coastal waters
The release of sulfur and nitrogen into the atmosphere by power plants and agricultural activities plays a minor role in making the ocean more acidic on a global scale, but the impact is greatly amplified in the shallower waters of the coastal ocean, according to new research by atmospheric and marine chemists. (2007-09-07)

A cluster of mutations in neurofibromatosis is important risk factor for severe symptoms
Research led by Ludwine Messiaen shows that missense mutations in a cluster of just five codons in the NF1 gene are an important risk factor for severe symptoms of the genetic disease neurofibromatosis type 1. Such information is vital to help guide clinical management and genetic counseling in this complex disease, and it shows a potential need for increased disease surveillance of patients with missense mutations in that cluster -- specifically, codons 844 to 848. (2017-12-28)

Researchers discover key gene in cells associated with age-related hearing loss
An international group of researchers, led by Ronna Hertzano, M.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor, Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, Anatomy and Neurobiology, at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM), and Michael Bowl, Ph.D., Programme Leader Track Scientist, Mammalian Genetics Unit, MRC Harwell Institute, UK, have identified the gene that acts as a key regulator for special cells needed in hearing. (2018-11-21)

Two antibiotics fight bacteria differently than thought
Two widely prescribed antibiotics -- chloramphenicol and linezolid -- may fight bacteria in a different way from what scientists and doctors thought for years, University of Illinois at Chicago researchers have found. Instead of indiscriminately stopping protein synthesis, the drugs put the brakes on the protein synthesis machinery only at specific locations in the gene. (2016-11-01)

Prediction of protein disorder from amino acid sequence
Structural disorder is vital for proteins' function in diverse biological processes. It is therefore highly desirable to be able to predict the degree of order and disorder from amino acid sequence. Researchers from Aarhus University have developed a prediction tool by using machine learning together with experimental NMR data for hundreds of proteins, which is envisaged to be useful for structural studies and understanding the biological role and regulation of proteins with disordered regions. (2020-09-09)

Reflux medications linked to chronic kidney disease and kidney failure
In an analysis of published studies, individuals who used proton pump inhibitors had a 33 percent increased relative risk of developing chronic kidney disease or kidney failure when compared with non-users. Results from the analysis will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2017 Oct. 31-Nov. 5 at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center in New Orleans, La. (2017-11-04)

Certain flu virus mutations may compensate for fitness costs of other mutations
Seasonal flu viruses continually undergo mutations that help them evade the human immune system, but some of these mutations can reduce a virus's potency. According to new research published in PLOS Pathogens, certain mutations in the genome of influenza A may help counteract the weakening effects of other mutations. (2018-01-18)

LSTM and Imperial College Researchers design new anti-influenza drugs
Researchers at LSTM and Imperial College London have designed drugs which could help combat any potential new flu pandemic, by targeting the receptors of the cells by which the virus gains entry to the human body. (2019-01-25)

Study reveals how antiepileptic drug causes problems during pregnancy
During pregnancy, use of the antiepileptic drug valproic acid has been associated with worse outcomes -- including fetal loss, impaired growth, major congenital malformations, increased risk of developmental problems, and autism -- compared with all other antiepileptic drugs. (2018-04-19)

Bionic bacteria may help fight disease and global warming
A strain of genetically enhanced bacteria developed by researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies may pave the way for new synthetic drugs and new ways of manufacturing medicines and biofuels, according to a paper published September 18 in Nature Chemical Biology. (2011-09-21)

Microcapsules gain a new power -- scavenging reactive oxygen species
Stable, biocompatible microcapsules have gained a new power -- the ability to scavenge reactive oxygen species. This may aid microcapsule survival in the body as the tiny polymer capsules carry a drug or other biomolecules. The microcapsules may also find use in antioxidant therapy or in industrial applications where scavenging of free radicals is needed. (2018-01-30)

Recovery from acid rain 'much slower than expected'
Studies in Scotland and Wales show that streams still have high levels of acidity from pollution in the 1970s and 1980s, despite efforts to clean them. (2007-09-28)

Acid reflux associated with head and neck cancers in older adults
Acid reflux was associated with cancer of the respiratory and upper digestive tracts in older adults. (2017-12-21)

TAU and Ichilov researchers develop treatment for familial adenomatous polyposis
Researchers from Tel Aviv University and Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center (Ichilov Hospital) have developed an innovative drug treatment for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), a rare, inherited condition that affects adolescents and young adults and often leads to colorectal cancer. (2019-10-03)

Novel use of NMR sheds light on easy-to-make electropolymerized catalysts
In the world of catalytic reactions, polymers created through electropolymerization are attracting renewed attention. A group of Chinese researchers recently provided the first detailed characterization of the electrochemical properties of polyaniline and polyaspartic acid (PASP) thin films. In AIP Advances, the team used a wide range of tests to characterize the polymers, especially their capacity for catalyzing the oxidation of popularly used materials, hydroquinone and catechol. (2018-10-05)

Secrets of succulents' water-wise ways revealed
Plant scientists at the University of Liverpool have revealed new insights into the mechanisms that allow certain plants to conserve water and tolerate drought. The research, which is published in The Plant Cell, could be used to help produce new crops that can thrive in previously inhospitable, hot and dry regions across the world. (2017-11-16)

Scientists create complex transmembrane proteins from scratch
Molecular engineers have now show that it is possible to build complex, custom-designed transmembrane proteins from scratch. In the living world, transmembrane proteins naturally occur embedded in the membranes of cells and cellular organelles. They are essential for a number of functions, such as movement of signals or substances from inside or outside a living cell. The ability to design synthetic proteins to span membranes could allow scientists to build ones that can perform specific, useful tasks. (2018-03-01)

Polymer synthesis gets a jolt of caffeine
Using caffeine as a catalyst, MIT researchers have devised a way to create gummy, biocompatible gels that could be used for drug delivery and other medical applications. (2018-04-13)

Seismic images show dinosaur-killing meteor made bigger splash
The most detailed 3-D seismic images yet of the Chicxulub impact crater may modify a theory explaining the (2008-01-23)

On the path toward molecular robots
Scientists at Hokkaido University have developed light-powered molecular motors that repetitively bend and unbend, bringing us closer to molecular robots. (2016-07-06)

A hidden route for fatty acids can make cancers resistant to therapy
Researchers from the lab of Prof. Sarah-Maria Fendt at the VIB-KU Leuven Center for Cancer Biology now demonstrate that certain tumor cells use an alternative -- previously unexplored -- pathway to produce fatty acids. This finding can explain the resistance of particular cancer types to fatty acid metabolism inhibition. (2019-02-06)

Mutating Ebola's key protein may stop replication
Researchers were able to mutate Viral Protein 40 (VP40) in a way that changed the residues of the protein, blocking the budding and replication of Ebola virus in a model system. (2018-03-12)

Study reveals novel biomarkers for future dementia risk
Sudha Seshadri, M.D., founding director of the Glenn Biggs Institute for Alzheimer's & Neurodegenerative Diseases at UT Health San Antonio, is co-leader and senior author on research announced March 6 that identifies novel biomarkers of risk for future dementia. (2018-03-06)

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