Popular Amino Acid News and Current Events | Page 25

Popular Amino Acid News and Current Events, Amino Acid News Articles.
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Methane production reduced in ruminants
Livestock farming is responsible for 18 percent of the world's greenhouse gases, and ruminants such as cattle, sheep and goats generate 35 percent of one of these gases -- methane, and according to experts they make a significant contribution to climate change. (2016-05-02)

Alpha-lipoic acid prevents kidney stones in mouse model of rare genetic disease
Alpha-lipoic acid, a dietary supplement widely available to consumers, prevented stone formation in a mouse model of cystinuria, a rare inherited disease that causes recurrent formation of painful and damaging kidney stones. The research, a collaboration between the Buck Institute for Research on Aging and the University of California, San Francisco, has led to the initiation of a clinical trial in patients suffering from the condition. (2017-02-06)

A new technique of antibiotic efficiency testing developed
Scientists from the Lomonosov Moscow State University in cooperation with colleagues have worked out a safe, not that expensive and highly efficient method, which allows to speed up and improve searching of new germicides. They have elaborated a system, which measures antimicrobial activity, along with determining the mode of action of a new material. (2016-11-29)

Gastric medications increase risk for recurrence of Clostridium difficile infection
Researchers at Mayo Clinic have found patients who use gastric suppression medications are at a higher risk for recurrent Clostridium difficile (C-diff) infection. C-diff is a bacterium that can cause symptoms ranging from diarrhea to life-threatening inflammation of the colon. The study is published in JAMA Internal Medicine. (2017-03-27)

Stanford/Intel study details power of new chip to diagnose disease, analyze protein interactions
Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and Intel Corp. have collaborated to synthesize and study a grid-like array of short pieces of a disease-associated protein on silicon chips normally used in computer microprocessors (2012-08-20)

Minimalist biostructures designed to create nanomaterials
Researchers from the IBB-UAB fabricate 4 molecules of only 7 amino acids with the ability to self-assemble and rapidly and inexpensively form nanomaterials for biomedical and nanotechnological purposes. Inspired on a type of natural assembly seen in amyloid fibres, four peptides were used to create one of the most resistant bionanomaterials described to date, nanocables and mini enzymes to act as a catalyst for the formation of nanomaterials. (2018-06-14)

Synthesis of tetrapeptides and screening of their antioxidant properties
Tetrapeptide Pro-Ala-Gly-Tyr (PAGY) and its analogues, namely, Pro-Ser-Gly-Tyr (PSGY), Pro-Ala-Phe-Tyr (PAFY), Pro-Phe-Phe-Tyr (PFFY) and Pro-Ala-Ile-Tyr (PAIY), were successfully synthesized via a solid phase peptide synthesis method with the Fmoc/t-Bu strategy. (2018-07-05)

Investigators find that bile acids reduce cocaine reward
Bile acids -- gut compounds that aid in the digestion of dietary fats -- reduce the desire for cocaine, according to a new study by researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and the University of Alabama at Birmingham. (2018-08-31)

CU Anschutz scientists identify genetic causes of mitochondrial diseases
An international team of scientists led by researchers from the University of Colorado School of Medicine have identified previously unknown genetic causes of mitochondrial diseases. (2018-10-03)

Study: Research ties common heartburn medications to kidney disease and failure
Common medications prescribed to treat heartburn, acid reflux and ulcers are linked to increased risks for kidney failure and chronic kidney disease, found a recent University at Buffalo study. (2019-03-18)

A new approach to targeting cancer cells
A University of California, Riverside, research team has come up with a new approach to targeting cancer cells that circumvents a challenge faced by currently available cancer drugs. (2019-05-17)

Mechanism of tumor metastasis and tumor-suppressive role of UDP-glucose revealed
Scientists from Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) and Shanghai Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology (SIBCB) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences revealed that UDP-glucose accelerates SNAI1 mRNA decay and impairs lung cancer metastasis. (2019-06-26)

Killing the seeds of cancer: A new finding shows potential in destroying cancer stem cells
When doctors remove a tumor surgically or use targeted therapies, the cancer may appear to be gone. However, evidence suggests a tiny subpopulation of adaptable cancer cells can remain and circulate through the body to seed new metastasis in far-off locations. A collaborative research project The University of Toledo has identified an entirely new class of molecules that shows promise in rooting out and killing those cancer stem cells. (2019-07-08)

Same genes, same conditions, different transport
The bacterium Lactococcus lactis is unable to produce the amino acid methionine and has to rely on uptake from the environment, using systems with high or low affinity. University of Groningen microbiologists discovered that cells growing in a clonal population can differ in the uptake system they use. The choice for either system is maintained over many generations. It is the first time that such stable heterogeneity is observed in an amino acid uptake pathway. (2020-03-05)

Scientists find new way to kill tuberculosis
Scientists have discovered a new way of killing the bacteria that cause tuberculosis (TB), using a toxin produced by the germ itself. (2020-07-29)

Nanodisk gene therapy
Researchers at Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona have discovered a novel gene therapy method using particles measuring only a few nanometers which encapsulate genetic material and introduce themselves directly into the cell nucleus. The nanodisks, as researchers have named the particles, travel rapidly to the interior of the cell until reaching the nucleus, thus increasing the efficiency of the gene transfer process. (2011-01-11)

Bird's eye perspective
Harvard Medical School researchers have now provided the first insight into the perplexing question of how humans developed their daytime vision. (2017-06-23)

Taking the jab (and the chill) out of vaccination
In the April edition of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, a team led by Associate Professor John Miles from James Cook University and Cardiff University's Professor Andrew Sewell describe how they engineered a new vaccine production platform and built a fully synthetic flu vaccine. (2018-03-12)

Intestinal bacteria produce electric current from sugar
Intestinal bacteria can create an electric current, according to a new study from Lund University in Sweden. The results are valuable for the development of drugs, but also for the production of bioenergy, for example. (2018-09-18)

Illinois study provides whole-system view of plant cold stress
When temperatures drop, plants can't bundle up. Stuck outside, exposed, plants instead undergo a series of biochemical changes that protect cells from damage. Scientists have described these changes and identified some of the genes controlling them, but it's not clear how all the processes work together. Lacking this global view, plant breeders have struggled to engineer cold-tolerant crops. A recent University of Illinois study provides answers. (2018-10-29)

New deep knowledge AI system could resolve bottlenecks in drug research
Researchers at the University of Waterloo have developed a new system that could significantly speed up the discovery of new drugs and reduce the need for costly and time-consuming laboratory tests. (2018-11-06)

Disease-aggravating mutation found in a mouse model of neonatal mitochondrial disease
The new mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variant drastically speeds up the disease progression in a mouse model of GRACILE syndrome. This discovery provides a new tool for studies of mitochondrial diseases. (2020-01-29)

A novel mechanism that triggers a cellular immune response
Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine present comprehensive evidence that supports a novel trigger for a cell-mediated response and propose a mechanism for its action. (2020-06-11)

Why protecting the brain against infection takes guts
The brain is uniquely protected against invading bacteria and viruses, but its defence mechanism has long remained a mystery. Now, a study in mice, confirmed in human samples, has shown that the brain has a surprising ally in its protection: the gut. (2020-11-04)

Lack of GBA2: A contraceptive for male mice
Although it had previously been thought that a protein known as GBA2 was important for bile acid metabolism, a new study appearing in the November issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation shows that in mice GBA2 is in fact required for male fertility. This study might explain the contraceptive effect in mice of a treatment for humans lacking the related protein GBA1 and could lead to the development of a new male contraceptive. (2006-11-01)

Herbivore defense in ferns
Researchers have found that bracken ferns do not release volatiles when attacked. Emission of volatiles usually attracts ichneumon wasps or predatory bugs that parasitize herbivores. Nevertheless, volatile emission could be elicited in fern fronds after treatment with jasmonic acid, which induces the synthesis of volatile substances in flowering plants. This suggests that ferns can in principle mobilize this kind of defense reaction. However, they do not use this indirect defense to fend off herbivores. (2012-11-21)

Ionic and covalent drug delivery
Researchers at Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences compared three different drug delivery models based on ionic liquids. Scientists have developed a powerful API-IL concept to access structural diversity and dual-action pharmaceuticals. The study, published in ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters, introduces new possibilities for application of drug delivery concept using ionic and covalent molecular level forces. (2015-10-07)

New theory addresses how life on earth arose from the primordial muck
Life on Earth originated in an intimate partnership between the nucleic acids (genetic instructions for all organisms) and small proteins called peptides, according to two new papers from biochemists and biologists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the University of Auckland. Their 'peptide-RNA' hypothesis contradicts the widely-held 'RNA-world' hypothesis, which states that life originated from nucleic acids and only later evolved to include proteins. (2017-11-01)

Scientists neutralize reactive nitrogen molecules to enhance cancer immunotherapy
Researchers at the University of Notre Dame studying tumors in prostate cancer models found that nitration of an amino acid can inhibit T-cell activation, thwarting the T-cell's ability to kill cancer cells. (2018-10-29)

Ketone body utilization decreases when blood flow to the heart is reduced
Researchers from Kumamoto University in Japan measured the ketone body utilization rate in the heart and confirmed that it decreases when the heart is in a state of reduced blood flow (myocardial ischemia). (2019-01-16)

New guidelines push for better controlled experiments with synthetic nucleic acids
Researchers have proposed new guidelines to overcome current problems facing scientists developing synthetic nucleic acids -- such as antisense oligonucleotides and double-stranded RNAs -- as drugs and research tools. (2019-04-04)

Microwaves are useful to combine amino acids with hetero-steroids
Aza-steroids are important class of compounds because of their numerous biological activities. The hetero steroids have different hydrogen bonding ability and hydrophobicity in comparison to steroids. (2020-09-29)

High-thermoresistant biopolyimides become water-soluble like starch
This is the first report for the syntheses of water-soluble polyimides which are Interestingly derived from bio-based resources, showing high transparency, tunable mechanical strength and the highest thermoresistance in water-soluble polymers reported ever. (2020-10-26)

Fish oil supplements don't raise bad cholesterol
The Fatty Acid Research Institute (FARI) has published a new research paper in conjunction with The Cooper Institute on the omega-3s EPA and DHA in fish oil and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). (2020-12-17)

New aspect of atom mimicry for nanotechnology applications
Tokyo Tech researchers show dendrimers that mimic the electron valency of atoms can also mimic polymerisation yielding controlled one and two-dimensional arrays of nanocontainers. (2016-12-02)

Fatty acids from GM oilseed crops could replace fish oil
Oil from genetically modified (GM) oil seed crops could replace fish oil as a primary source of the beneficial omega 3 fatty acid EPA -- according to new research from the University of East Anglia. Researchers studied the effect in mice of consuming feed enriched with oil from glasshouse-grown genetically engineered Camelina sativa, developed at the agricultural science center Rothamsted Research. The results show that the benefits were similar to those derived from fish oils. (2016-01-20)

Treatment of silent acid reflux does not improve asthma in children, NIH study finds
Adding the acid reflux drug lansoprazole to a standard inhaled steroid treatment for asthma does not improve asthma control in children who have no symptom of acid reflux, according to a new study funded in part by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health. Lansoprazole therapy slightly increased the risk of sore throats and other respiratory problems in children, however (2012-01-24)

Altering genes with the aid of light
Scientists have been manipulating genes for a while. The University of Pittsburgh's Alexander Deiters just found a way to control the process with higher precision. By using light. (2015-05-08)

Pungent tasting substance in ginger reduces bad breath
The pungent compound 6-gingerol in ginger stimulates an enzyme contained in saliva which breaks down foul-smelling substances. It thus ensures fresh breath and a better aftertaste. Citric acid increases the sodium ion content of saliva, making salty foods taste less salty. To find out more about food components, a team from Technical University Munich and the Leibniz-Institute for Food Systems Biology investigated the effects of food components on the molecules dissolved in saliva. (2018-07-30)

New approach to treating chronic itch
Two receptors in the spinal cord and the right experimental drug: Researchers at the University of Zurich have discovered a new approach that suppresses itch. In a series of experiments in mice and dogs they successfully alleviated different forms of acute as well as chronic itch. For the latter, current treatment options are very limited. (2018-08-14)

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