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Popular Amino Acid News and Current Events, Amino Acid News Articles.
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Study sheds light on the function of a long-mysterious PCSK9 mutation
High LDL a leading risk factor for heart disease. Many cholesterol medications lower LDL, some of them by targeting the protein PCSK9. In the January issue of the Journal of Lipid Research, scientists at the University of California, San Francisco, report on an investigation into why experiments on PCSK9 give different results in a test tube and in liver cells. What they found may explain how a mutation in PCSK9 that has long puzzled scientists leads to heart disease. (2019-01-02)

Study reveals novel biomarkers for future dementia risk
Sudha Seshadri, M.D., founding director of the Glenn Biggs Institute for Alzheimer's & Neurodegenerative Diseases at UT Health San Antonio, is co-leader and senior author on research announced March 6 that identifies novel biomarkers of risk for future dementia. (2018-03-06)

Mutating Ebola's key protein may stop replication
Researchers were able to mutate Viral Protein 40 (VP40) in a way that changed the residues of the protein, blocking the budding and replication of Ebola virus in a model system. (2018-03-12)

E. coli's internal bomb may provide novel target for treatment strategy
Bacteria's internal bomb, the so-called toxin-antitoxin (TA) system that is part of the normal bacterial makeup, may be triggered to make bacteria turn on themselves, providing a valuable target for novel antimicrobial approaches in drug design, according to research presented at the 28th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID). (2018-04-20)

Completing the drug design jigsaw
A powerful new way of analysing how drugs interact with molecules in the body could aid the design of better treatments with fewer side-effects. (2017-10-05)

New technology for enzyme design
Scientists at the University of Würzburg have chemically modified the enzyme levansucrase using a new method. The enzyme can now produce sugar polymers that are exciting for applications in the food industry and medicine. (2018-06-01)

Steroid injections do not hasten the need for knee replacement
New research shows that corticosteroid injections for knee OA treatment do not hasten a patient's progression to a total knee replacement when compared with hyaluronic acid injections. Details of this study was presented at ACR Convergence, the American College of Rheumatology's annual meeting. (2020-11-06)

Scientists identify a key mechanism regulating a protein required for muscle and heart function
Scientists at the CNIC and Columbia University have identified a new mechanism regulating the elasticity of titin, a protein with important roles in the function of skeletal and heart muscle. (2018-01-12)

Next frontier in bacterial engineering
A new technique overcomes a serious hurdle in the field of bacterial design and engineering. Researchers develop method to identify proteins that enable highly efficient bacterial design. Approach has potential to boost efforts in bacterial design to tackle infectious diseases, bacterial drug resistance, environmental cleanup and more. (2020-05-29)

Researchers pinpoint gene responsible for neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism
Researchers found alterations of the gene thousand and one amino-acid kinase 2, known as TAOK2, plays a direct role in neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism. This is the first comprehensive study that supports previous research suggesting the involvement of this gene. (2018-03-05)

Mineral weathering from thawing permafrost can release substantial CO2
The amount of carbon dioxide released from thawing permafrost might be greater than previously thought, according to a new study by University of Alberta ecologists. The research is the first to document the potential for substantial contributions of CO2 from thawing permafrost to the atmosphere through an inorganic process called mineral weathering. (2018-09-19)

Bright and stable: New acid-tolerant green fluorescent protein for bioimaging
Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are powerful tools for visualization of molecular and cellular processes; however, most FPs lose fluorescence at a pH lower than their neutral pKa (~6). A team of Osaka University researchers developed the acid-tolerant green FP -- termed Gamillus -- cloned from flower hat jellyfish. Gamillus exhibits excellent brightness, maturation speed, and photostablity, even in low pH environments, making it a feasible molecular tag for imaging in acidic organelles. (2018-01-04)

How plants handle stress
Plants get stressed too. Drought or too much salt disrupt their physiology. An international research team led by the Hebrew University of Jerusalem with the participation of the University of Göttingen investigated how evolutionary changes in receptor proteins led to their ability to sense the hormone abscisic acid (ABA). This enabled them to develop mechanisms that aided their colonization of dry land and their response to stress. The results were published in the journal PNAS. (2019-11-20)

Photosynthesis -- living laboratories
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich biologists Marcel Dann and Dario Leister have demonstrated for the first time that cyanobacteria and plants employ similar mechanisms and key proteins to regulate cyclic electron flow during photosynthesis. (2019-11-27)

'Silent code' of nucleotides, not amino acids, determines functions of vital proteins
Humans possess six forms of the protein actin, which perform essential functions in the body. Two in particular, β-actin and γ-actin, are nearly identical, only differing by four amino acids. Yet these near-twin proteins carry out distinct roles. A long standing question for biologists has been, how is this possible? New findings from the University of Pennsylvania have pointed to a surprising answer. The differing functions of these proteins are determined not by their amino acid sequences but by their genetic code. (2018-01-03)

Women run faster after taking newly developed supplement, study finds
A new study found that women who took a specially prepared blend of minerals and nutrients for a month saw their 3-mile run times drop by almost a minute. The women who took the supplement also saw improvements in distance covered in 25 minutes on a stationary bike and a third test in which they stepped on and off a bench, according to research from The Ohio State University. (2018-01-18)

How corals adapt to day and night
Researchers have uncovered a gene in corals that responds to day/night cycles, which provides some tantalizing clues into how symbiotic corals work together with their plankton partners. (2008-09-12)

Repetition key to self-healing, flexible medical devices
Medical devices powered by synthetic proteins created from repeated sequences of proteins may be possible, according to materials science and biotechnology experts, who looked at material inspired by the proteins in squid ring teeth. (2018-02-08)

Combating sulphuric acid corrosion at wastewater plants
Writing in Water Research, Austrian researchers from TU Graz and the University of Graz discuss new materials that prevent damage from microbial induced concrete corrosion. (2018-02-23)

Microbes help make the coffee
When it comes to processing coffee beans, longer fermentation times can result in better taste, contrary to conventional wisdom. Lactic acid bacteria play an important, positive role in this process. Other species of microbes may play a role in this process as well, but more research is needed to better understand their role. The research is published Feb. 1 in Applied and Environmental Microbiology. (2019-02-01)

Brain cancer: Typical mutation in cancer cells stifles immune response
The exchange of a single amino acid building block in a metabolic enzyme can lead to cancer. In addition, it can impair the immune system, scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), the University Hospitals in Mannheim and Heidelberg, and the German Cancer Consortium now report. It thus blocks the body's immune response in the battle against the mutant molecule and also impedes immunotherapy against brain cancer. This findingsuggests that rethinking antitumor immunotherapy is required. (2018-07-09)

Biomarker, clues to possible therapy found in novel childhood neurogenetic disease
Researchers studying a rare genetic disorder that causes severe, progressive neurological problems in childhood have discovered insights into biological mechanisms that drive the disease, along with early clues that an amino acid supplement might offer a targeted therapy. The disorder, called TBCK-encephalopathy, disrupts autophagy, an important cellular waste-disposal process. (2018-02-22)

New discovery offers hope of protecting premature babies from blindness
Now there is hope of a new way to protect extremely premature babies from impaired vision or blindness resulting from the eye disease retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). A study at Sahlgrenska Academy published in JAMA Ophthalmology points to a clear link between ROP and low levels of the fatty acid arachidonic acid, measured in children's blood. (2018-02-09)

How royal jelly helps honeybee larvae defy gravity and become queens
Honeybee larvae develop into queen bees if they are fed large quantities of a food called royal jelly. But royal jelly does more than determine whether a larva becomes a queen: it also keeps her safely anchored to the roof of the queen cell in which she develops. Research published in Current Biology on March 15 explains how the pH of royal jelly helps make the substance viscous enough to keep the queen-to-be from falling. (2018-03-15)

Newly discovered compounds shed fresh light on whole grain health benefits
Scientists have discovered new compounds that may explain whole grain health benefits, reports a new study led by the University of Eastern Finland. A high intake of whole grains increased the levels of betaine compounds in the body which, in turn, was associated with improved glucose metabolism, among other things. The findings shed new light on the cell level effects of a whole grain-rich diet, and can help in development of increasingly healthy food products. (2018-10-03)

High-protein corn also resistant to parasitic weed
In sub-Saharan Africa, 20 to 80% of corn yields may be lost because of a semi-parasitic plant, Striga. In areas infested with Striga, farmers may even lose their entire crops. In a new study, researchers from southern Africa identified several varieties of corn resistant or tolerant to Striga. Importantly, these varieties also have improved nutritional content, particularly protein. (2018-06-13)

Discovering potential therapeutic protein inhibitors for Chagas disease
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech), Nagasaki University have identified four potential protein inhibitors and unlocked drug discovery strategies for the treatment of Chagas disease by using advanced three-dimensional computer simulation by supercomputer TSUBAME in combination with in vitro experiments and X-ray crystallography. Through this (2017-09-26)

The role of GABA neurons in the central circadian clock has been discovered
Temporal order of physiology and behavior is regulated by the central circadian clock located in the SCN. The authors found that GABA in the SCN suppress the burst firing of neuronal activity and intracellular Ca2+ spikes but not for the generation and stability of the molecular circadian oscillation in the SCN. The GABA network may refine the circadian firing rhythm to ensure noiseless communications with neurons outside the SCN. (2019-09-07)

Discovery of biomarkers for the prognosis of chronic kidney disease
Currently, there is no effective method to predict the prognosis of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Tomonori Kimura and Yoshitaka Isaka, researchers in Department of Nephrology, Osaka University, found that measuring D-amino acids, which present only trace in human, provides prognostic information of CKD. The present discovery would facilitate CKD treatment and thus improve the prognosis of CKD, and may also lead to the further discovery of novel therapy. (2016-07-28)

Insects and umami receptors
Insects, like mammals including humans, sort chemicals by taste into a few categories and use this information to decide whether to ingest or reject food. University of California, Riverside researchers have identified a receptor playing a key role in insect identification of amino acid, or umami, taste. (2017-01-23)

How exercise training promotes a sound mind in a sound body
A new study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden shows that the same mechanisms behind the beneficial effects of exercise training on the brain also help to counteract fat and to strengthen the immune system. The results, which are published in the journal Cell Metabolism, can ultimately give rise to new obesity and diabetes drugs. (2018-02-06)

PNAS study: Extreme-altitude birds evolved same trait via different mutations
All extreme-altitude birds have evolved especially efficient systems for delivering scarce oxygen to their tissues. But a new study led by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln has found that these birds often evolved different blueprints for assembling the proteins -- hemoglobins -- that actually capture oxygen in the Himalayas and Andes. (2018-02-20)

Carbon dioxide as a raw material
Researchers at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum have found a way to turn climate-damaging CO2 into an alcohol that could serve as a raw material for the chemical industry - without producing large amounts of salt waste that usually arise. The reaction mechanism is described by the team around Timo Wendling and Prof Dr Lukas Goossen together with a colleague of the Technical University of Kaiserslautern in the journal 'Chemistry - A European Journal'. (2018-04-17)

Shape-shifting agent targets harmful bacteria in the stomach
A new shape-shifting polymer can target and kill Helicobacter pylori bacteria in the stomach without killing helpful bacteria in the gut. Such a treatment could improve the digestive health of billions of people worldwide who contract H. pylori infections. The antimicrobial agent morphs into a bacterial hole-puncher in the stomach's acidic environment and reverts to an amorphous, inactive structure when it reaches the higher pH environment of the small intestine. (2017-11-14)

Database shows effects of acid rain on microorganisms in Adirondack Lakes
Researchers have long known that acid rain can severely decrease the diversity of plant and animal communities in fresh water lakes and ponds. However, little is known about how microscopic bacteria, which form the foundation of freshwater ecosystems, respond to acidification. (2008-06-23)

Study links low carbohydrate intake to increased risk of birth defects
Women who are pregnant or planning to become pregnant may want to avoid diets that reduce or eliminate carbohydrates, as they could increase the risk of having babies with neural tube birth defects, according to a new study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. (2018-01-25)

Pig model of Huntington's offers advantages for testing treatments
A team of scientists has established a 'knock in' pig model of Huntington's disease (HD), an inherited neurodegenerative disease, anticipated to be useful for testing treatments. (2018-03-29)

Research targets PFOA threat to drinking water
A highly toxic water pollutant, known as perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), last year caused a number of US communities to close their drinking water supplies. PFOA contamination also is a pervasive problem worldwide. A Northwestern University-led research team now reports an inexpensive and renewable material that rapidly removes PFOA from water. The novel treatment effectively eliminates the micropollutant to below 10 parts per trillion, far below US Environmental Protection Agency and all state health advisory limits. (2017-06-08)

Major 'missed' biochemical pathway emerges as important in virtually all cells
Researchers at Duke University Medical Center have published a study in Science that provides compelling evidence that the nitric oxide system in cells is very broad-based and important, resembling in its essence the much-studied system of phosphorylation. The findings may offer new insights into how cells work and the basis of many diseases. (2008-05-22)

Folic acid late in pregnancy may increase childhood allergy risk
Research from the University of Adelaide suggests that taking folic acid in late pregnancy may increase the risk of allergies in children affected by growth restriction during pregnancy. (2017-12-22)

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