Nav: Home

Popular Amino Acids News and Current Events

Popular Amino Acids News and Current Events, Amino Acids News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Not silent at all
The so-called 'silent' or 'synonymous' genetic alterations do not result in altered proteins. (2019-06-12)
Following the light
Considering that light is the driving force behind the growth and productivity of reef ecosystems, scientists are interested in understanding the relationship between primary productivity and varying light conditions. (2019-02-05)
Big data studies scrutinize links between fatty liver disease and how cells make energy
Three recent studies investigate changes in mitochondria, the cell's energy producers, as fatty liver disease (NAFLD) progresses to steatohepatosis (NASH). (2018-09-14)
Folding revolution
A Harvard Medical School scientist has used a form of artificial intelligence known as deep learning to predict the 3D structure of effectively any protein based on its amino acid sequence. (2019-04-17)
Tipping the scales
Human cells have a sophisticated regulatory system at their disposal: labeling proteins with the small molecule ubiquitin. (2019-04-03)
Study shows high phenolic acid intake -- associated with a healthy diet -- is associated with reduced breast cancer risk
New research presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Glasgow, Scotland (April 28-May 1) shows that a high intake of phenolic acids -- associated with a healthy diet -- is associated with a decreased risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. (2019-04-30)
Texas A&M AgriLife study shows BPA risk factor for inflammatory bowel disease
A recent study in a preclinical model of inflammatory bowel disease shows dietary exposure to bisphenol-A, or BPA, found in polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins, can increase mortality and worsen its symptoms. (2018-07-05)
Whole eggs better for muscle building and repair than egg whites, researchers find
People who consume 18 grams of protein from whole eggs or from egg whites after engaging in resistance exercise differ dramatically in how their muscles build protein, a process called protein synthesis, during the post-workout period, researchers report in a new study. (2017-12-20)
Genetically boosting the nutritional value of corn could benefit millions
Rutgers scientists have found an efficient way to enhance the nutritional value of corn -- the world's largest commodity crop -- by inserting a bacterial gene that causes it to produce a key nutrient called methionine, according to a new study. (2017-10-09)
New link between gut bacteria and obesity
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have discovered a new link between gut bacteria and obesity. (2018-02-23)
Will supplements help your workout or diet routine?
The new year is a time to set new goals, and for many people this means losing weight and improving fitness. (2018-01-24)
Hydrogen bonds directly detected for the first time
For the first time, scientists have succeeded in studying the strength of hydrogen bonds in a single molecule using an atomic force microscope. (2017-05-12)
Biophysics: Bacterial adhesion in vitro and in silico
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich researchers have characterized the physical mechanism that enables a widespread bacterial pathogen to adhere to the tissues of its human host. (2018-03-29)
Russian chemists discovered a surprising effect of a well-known leukemia drug
Researchers from RUDN University and Institute of Biomedical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences have identified an alternative mechanism for the effective antitumor drug -- an enzyme called L-asparaginase. (2017-11-10)
Novel technique helps ID elusive molecules
Stuart Lindsay, a researcher at Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute, has devised a clever means of identifying carbohydrate molecules quickly and accurately. (2016-12-21)
Critical Materials Institute develops new acid-free magnet recycling process
A new rare-earth magnet recycling process developed by researchers at the Critical Materials Institute dissolves magnets in an acid-free solution and recovers high purity rare earth elements. (2017-09-07)
Interrogating proteins
Scientists from the University of Bristol have designed a new protein structure, and are using it to understand how protein structures are stabilized. (2017-05-22)
Unlocking the mystery of pollen tube guidance
Pollen tube guidance towards the ovule is an important step for fertilization in flowering plants. (2017-12-29)
Bitter rapeseed
Rapeseed doesn't just contain oil but high-quality protein, too. However, protein extracts from rapeseed have an intense, bitter off-taste. (2019-01-31)
Your stomach bacteria determines which diet is best for weight reduction
New research enables 'tailored' diet advice -- based on our personal gut microbiome -- for persons who want to lose weight and reduce the risk of disease. (2015-09-10)
Microbial fuel cell converts methane to electricity
Transporting methane from gas wellheads to market provides multiple opportunities for this greenhouse gas to leak into the atmosphere. (2017-05-17)
Proteins that can take the heat
Ancient proteins may offer clues on how to engineer proteins that can withstand the high temperatures required in industrial applications, according to new research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2017-03-30)
Choose Omega-3s from fish over flax for cancer prevention, study finds
Omega-3s from fish pack a stronger punch than flaxseed and other oils when it comes to cancer prevention, according to a first-ever University of Guelph study. (2018-01-26)
Systems biology approach identifies nutrient regulation of biological clock in plants
Using a systems biological analysis of genome-scale data from the model plant Arabidopsis, an international team of researchers identified that the master gene controlling the biological clock is sensitive to nutrient status. (2008-03-14)
Walnuts impact gut microbiome and improve health
Diets rich in nuts, such as walnuts, have been shown to play a role in heart health and in reducing colorectal cancer. (2018-05-03)
Polyunsaturated fatty acids linked to reduced allergy risk
New research from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden reveals that high levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids in children's blood are associated with a reduced risk of asthma or rhinitis at the age of 16 years. (2017-12-05)
A unique amino acid for brain cancer therapy
Researchers discover potential application of amino acid taurine in photodynamic therapy for brain cancer. (2017-06-23)
A cluster of mutations in neurofibromatosis is important risk factor for severe symptoms
Research led by Ludwine Messiaen shows that missense mutations in a cluster of just five codons in the NF1 gene are an important risk factor for severe symptoms of the genetic disease neurofibromatosis type 1. (2017-12-28)
En route to custom-designed natural products
Microorganisms often assemble natural products similar to industrial assembly lines. (2018-10-19)
New form of autism found
Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) affect around one percent of the world's population and are characterized by a range of difficulties in social interaction and communication. (2016-12-01)
Scientists create complex transmembrane proteins from scratch
Molecular engineers have now show that it is possible to build complex, custom-designed transmembrane proteins from scratch. (2018-03-01)
Study reveals novel biomarkers for future dementia risk
Sudha Seshadri, M.D., founding director of the Glenn Biggs Institute for Alzheimer's & Neurodegenerative Diseases at UT Health San Antonio, is co-leader and senior author on research announced March 6 that identifies novel biomarkers of risk for future dementia. (2018-03-06)
A new tool to decipher evolutionary biology
A new bioinformatics tool to compare genome data has been developed by teams from the Max F. (2017-05-09)
Powerful new tool for looking for life beyond Earth
NASA has developed an innovative new spectroscopy instrument to aid the search for extraterrestrial life. (2017-12-20)
Microbiome differences between urban and rural populations start soon after birth
An analysis comparing the intestinal microbiomes of both infants and adults living in rural and urban areas of Nigeria has revealed that not only are there many differences in adults living in subsistence environments versus urban ones but also that these variations begin at a very young age. (2018-06-05)
Successful synthesis of gamma-lactam rings from hydrocarbons
IBS scientists have designed a novel strategy to synthesize ring-shaped cyclic molecules, highly sought-after by pharmaceutical and chemical industries, and known as gamma-lactams. (2018-03-01)
Bionic bacteria may help fight disease and global warming
A strain of genetically enhanced bacteria developed by researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies may pave the way for new synthetic drugs and new ways of manufacturing medicines and biofuels, according to a paper published September 18 in Nature Chemical Biology. (2011-09-21)
Potential new way to limit antibiotic resistance spreading
One of the biggest current threats to global health is the rise of multi-drug resistant bacteria, caused by the spreading of antibiotic resistance amongst them. (2018-03-15)
CD4 T cells, xenobiotic transporters, and metabolites in inflammatory bowel diseases
Few studies have investigated the interaction between intestinal T cells with metabolites. (2017-12-26)
Completing the drug design jigsaw
A powerful new way of analysing how drugs interact with molecules in the body could aid the design of better treatments with fewer side-effects. (2017-10-05)
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Anthropomorphic
Do animals grieve? Do they have language or consciousness? For a long time, scientists resisted the urge to look for human qualities in animals. This hour, TED speakers explore how that is changing. Guests include biological anthropologist Barbara King, dolphin researcher Denise Herzing, primatologist Frans de Waal, and ecologist Carl Safina.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#534 Bacteria are Coming for Your OJ
What makes breakfast, breakfast? Well, according to every movie and TV show we've ever seen, a big glass of orange juice is basically required. But our morning grapefruit might be in danger. Why? Citrus greening, a bacteria carried by a bug, has infected 90% of the citrus groves in Florida. It's coming for your OJ. We'll talk with University of Maryland plant virologist Anne Simon about ways to stop the citrus killer, and with science writer and journalist Maryn McKenna about why throwing antibiotics at the problem is probably not the solution. Related links: A Review of the Citrus Greening...