Popular Amphibians News and Current Events

Popular Amphibians News and Current Events, Amphibians News Articles.
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Wood frogs research clarifies risks posed to animals by warming climate
As conditions warm, fish and wildlife living at the southern edge of their species' ranges are most at risk, according to Penn State researchers who led a major collaborative study of how wood frogs are being affected by climate change. (2017-08-19)

Mechanisms explaining positional diversity of the hindlimb in tetrapod evolution
Elucidating how body parts in their earliest recognizable form are assembled in tetrapods during development is essential for understanding the nature of morphological evolution. Nagoya University researchers found in eight tetrapod species that the position of the sacral vertebrae and the hindlimbs is determined by the initiation timing of Gdf11 gene expression. This will contribute to a forthcoming model explaining the coupling of spine and hindlimb positioning - a major step in fully understanding tetrapod evolution. (2017-08-18)

Climate change risk for half of plant and animal species in biodiversity hotspots
Up to half of plant and animal species in the world's most naturally rich areas, such as the Amazon and the Galapagos, could face local extinction by the turn of the century due to climate change if carbon emissions continue to rise unchecked. Even if the Paris Climate Agreement 2°C target is met, these places could lose 25 percent of their species. Researchers examined the impact of climate change on nearly 80,000 plant and animal species in 35 areas. (2018-03-13)

Mammals and birds could have best shot at surviving climate change 
New research that analyzed more than 270 million years of data on animals shows that mammals and birds -- both warm-blooded animals -- may have a better chance of evolving and adapting to the Earth's rapidly changing climate than their cold-blooded peers, reptiles and amphibians. (2018-01-29)

Study warns that snake fungal disease could be a global threat
New research suggests that a potentially fatal snake fungus found in several species in the United States and three in Europe could be global in scale. The study shows that the snake fungal disease caused by Ophidiomyces ophidiodiicola can infect snakes of many species regardless of their ancestry, physical characteristics, or habitats. The study's authors warn that future surveys for the disease should assume that all snake species harbor this pathogen. (2017-12-20)

Common pesticides kill amphibian parasites, study finds
A recent study by Jessica Hua, assistant professor of biological sciences at Binghamton University, and colleagues, explored the effects of six commonly used pesticides on two different populations of a widespread parasite of amphibians. They found that a broad range of insecticides commonly used in the US kill amphibian parasites, which could potentially decrease the number of parasites that amphibians must defend against. For the pyrethroid and neonicotinoid pesticides tested in this study, this pattern has not been documented before. (2016-04-04)

Preventing people from abandoning exotic pets that threatened biodiversity
Abandoning exotic pets is an ethical problem that can lead to biological invasions that threaten conservation of biodiversity in the environment. An article published in the journal Biological Invasions, whose first author is the researcher Alberto Maceda Veiga, from the Biodiversity Research Institute of the University of Barcelona (IRBio), reveals that the release of invasive species in the environment has not been reduced despite the regulation that prohibits the possession of these species since 2011. (2019-07-25)

My, what big teeth you had! Extinct species had large teeth on roof of mouth
Paleontologists have found a previously unknown amphibious predator that probably made the Antarctica of 240 million years ago something less than a hospitable place. (2008-09-11)

Wildlife researchers identify impacts of contamination in amphibians
Researchers from different insititutions working together at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory and in the field have demonstrated that amphibians are exposed to contaminants through maternal transfer, as has been proven for other vertebrates. (2006-02-21)

Inflammation in regeneration: A friend or foe?
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have discovered a novel mechanism linking inflammation and organ regeneration in fish, which can be conserved among vertebrates. (2017-03-06)

Iguana-sized dinosaur cousin discovered in Antarctica
Scientists have discovered the fossils of an iguana-sized reptile, which they named 'Antarctic king,' that lived at the South Pole 250 million years ago (it used to be warmer). Antarctanax was an early cousin of the dinosaurs, and it shows how life bounced back after the world's biggest mass extinction. (2019-01-31)

What stops mass extinctions?
What slows or stops a disease epidemic if the pathogen is still present? It appears that wild frogs are becoming increasingly resistant to the chytrid fungal disease that has decimated amphibian populations around the world. (2018-03-29)

Instability of wildlife trade does not encourage trappers to conserve natural habitats
The collection of wildlife for trade is unreliable and financially risky, thus limiting opportunities to incentivise biodiversity conservation at a local level, according to research by the University of Kent. (2018-03-07)

New study points to agriculture in frog sexual abnormalities
A farm irrigation canal would seem a healthier place for toads than a ditch by a supermarket parking lot. But University of Florida scientists have found the opposite is true. In a study with wide implications for a longstanding debate over whether agricultural chemicals pose a threat to amphibians, UF zoologists have found that toads in suburban areas are less likely to suffer from reproductive system abnormalities than toads near farms -- where some had both testes and ovaries (2008-07-03)

Genetic clues reveal origins of killer fungus behind the 'amphibian plague'
A deadly fungus responsible for the devastation of amphibian populations around the world may have originated in East Asia, new research has found. (2018-05-10)

Common insecticide can decimate tadpole populations
The latest findings of a University of Pittsburgh-based project to determine the environmental impact of routine pesticide use suggests that malathion -- the most popular insecticide in the United States -- can decimate tadpole populations by altering their food chain, according to research published in the Oct. 1 edition of Ecological Applications. (2008-09-29)

Colder temperatures foster greater microbial diversity on amphibian skin
A far-reaching global study led by University of Colorado Boulder scientists has found that climate is a critical determinant of microbial diversity on amphibian skin, with colder, more variable temperatures producing richer bacterial communities than warmer, more stable environments. (2019-03-27)

Playing both ends: Amphibian adapted to varied evolutionary pressures
Caecilian, Siphonops annulatus, a limbless amphibian found throughout Brazil, has a concentration of enlarged mucous glands in its head region and a concentration of enlarged poison glands in its posterior region. These concentration appear to have evolved from different selective pressures: the ability to tunnel into the ground and to defend oneself from predators. (2018-02-23)

Ancient origins of viruses discovered
Research published today in Nature has found that many of the viruses infecting us today have ancient evolutionary histories that date back to the first vertebrates and perhaps the first animals in existence. (2018-04-04)

Spring is springing earlier in polar regions than across the rest of earth
For every 10 degrees north from the equator you move, spring arrives about four days earlier than it did a decade ago, according to a study led by UC Davis. This is three times greater than what previous studies indicated. The authors connect such differences to more rapid warming at higher latitudes. (2018-03-02)

Early warning system for deadly amphibian pathogen
Environmental DNA is a new technology that detects telltale bits of genetic material that living creatures shed into their environment. WSU scientists demonstrate for the first time that it can be used to detect the presence of a deadly pathogen before it wipes out populations of amphibians. (2018-03-12)

UGA study reveals ecosystem-level consequences of frog extinctions
Streams that once sang with the croaks, chirps and ribbits of dozens of frog species have gone silent. They're victims of a fungus that's decimating amphibian populations worldwide. (2008-10-16)

Amphibians can become tolerant to pesticides, but at a cost
Amphibians can develop tolerance to pesticides, but this tolerance can lead to increased susceptibility to parasites, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2017-07-17)

When it comes to the threat of extinction, size matters
Animals in the Goldilocks zone -- neither too big, nor too small, but just the right size -- face a lower risk of extinction than do those on both ends of the scale, according to an extensive global analysis. (2017-09-18)

Deadly amphibian fungus has its origins in East Asia
The fungus kills frogs, toads and salamanders, and now we know where it emerged. The pet trade may be to blame. (2018-07-03)

Scientists complete conservation puzzle, shaping understanding of life on earth
An international team of scientists have completed the 'atlas of life' -- the first global review and map of every vertebrate on Earth. Led by researchers at the University of Oxford and Tel Aviv University, the 39 scientists have produced a catalogue and atlas of the world's reptiles. By linking this atlas with existing maps for birds, mammals and amphibians, the team have found many new areas where conservation action is vital. (2017-10-09)

Worm genomes reveal a link between ourselves and our distant relatives
Researchers from the Marine Genomics Unit at OIST, in collaboration with Okayama University, have decoded two worm genomes and found that they have several genetic similarities with the vertebrates. (2017-12-04)

On the land, one-quarter of vertebrates die because of humans
Humans have a ''disproportionately huge effect'' on the other species of vertebrates that share Earth's surface with us, causing more than 25 percent of the deaths among an array of species all over the globe, according to a recently published study. (2019-02-11)

Road losses add up, taxing amphibians and other animals
When frogs hit the road, many croak. Researchers found more than 65 animal species killed along a short stretch of roads and nearly 95 percent of the total dead were frogs and other amphibians, suggesting that road-related death, or road-kill, possibly contributes to their worldwide decline. (2008-04-16)

Study on frogs helps scientists understand disease outbreak and progression
The search for answers to protect Central American frogs from extinction is also giving scientists clues on how to predict and respond to emerging diseases and epidemics in humans, plants and other wildlife. In their paper published in the magazine Science, March 30, University of Nevada, Reno's Jamie Voyles and her colleagues document the recovery of some tropical amphibians following continued exposure to a lethal pathogen. (2018-03-29)

Invasive amphibian fungus could threaten US salamander populations
A deadly fungus causing population crashes in wild European salamanders could emerge in the United States and threaten already declining amphibians here, according to a report released today by the US Geological Survey. (2016-01-20)

Scientists find some human cancers to be 'evolutionary accidents'
New research, published in Biological Reviews and conducted by researchers from the University of Liverpool and Escola Superior de Ciências da Saúde (Brasília, Brazil) has found some type of cancers unique to humans may be a result of evolutionary accidents. (2018-04-17)

Ancient amphibian had mouthful of teeth ready to grab you: UTM research
The idea of being bitten by a nearly toothless modern frog or salamander sounds laughable, but their ancient ancestors had a full array of teeth, large fangs and thousands of tiny hook-like structures called denticles on the roofs of their mouths that would snare prey, according to new research by paleontologists at the University of Toronto Mississauga (UTM). (2017-09-15)

UK wild newt species free from flesh-eating fungus for now...
The UK's wild newt populations seem to be free from a flesh-eating lethal fungus known to be prevalent in privately-owned amphibians across Western Europe, a nationwide investigation has found. (2019-03-12)

Rocky habitats need to be protected for endangered amphibians to survive
An international team of scientists led by the University of Plymouth has published research in the PLOS ONE journal showing that rare amphibians living on rocky plateaus in western India are in desperate need of greater protection as their habitats are being eroded. (2018-03-26)

Atrazine alters the sex ration in Blanchard's cricket frogs
A study published recently in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry found that Blanchard's cricket frogs are highly sensitive to atrazine. When exposed, there were up to 55 percent fewer males than females compared with the control group, indicating that atrazine can affect the sex ratio. However, cricket frog populations do persist in areas with widespread atrazine application, despite reports of range contractions for enigmatic reasons. (2017-10-13)

Unheard of life history for a vertebrate
There is a newly discovered life history among the 28,300 species of known tetrapods. A chameleon from arid southwestern Madagascar spends up to three-quarters of its life in an egg. Even more unusual, life after hatching is a mere 4 to 5 months. No other known four-legged animal has such a rapid growth rate and such a short life span. The new research is reported in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2008-06-30)

Ancient amphibians evolved a bite before migrating to dry land
Ancient aquatic amphibians developed the ability to feed on land before completing the transition to terrestrial life, researchers from Harvard University report this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Their work is based on analysis of the skulls of the first amphibians, which arose 375 million years ago, and their fish ancestors. (2007-04-16)

Green toads with multiple genomes have ancestors that are only distantly related
Dr. Matthias Stoeck from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and researchers from the University of Lausanne (Switzerland) and the Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) have just published an extensive phylogenetic tree for the Eurasian green toads. This phylogenetic tree shows that polyploid species are hybrids and only descend from parental species with a very high degree of genetic divergence. (2018-02-20)

Invasive water frogs too dominant for native species
In the past two decades, water frogs have spread rapidly in Central Europe. Using a new statistical model, researchers from the University of Basel were now able to show that local species such as the Yellow-bellied Toad and the Common Midwife Toad are suffering from the more dominant water frogs. The journal American Naturalist has published their results. (2016-02-29)

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