Popular Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis News and Current Events

Popular Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis News and Current Events, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis News Articles.
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Dartmouth College brings smartwatch innovations to CHI2018
The latest developmental research seeks to increase the functionality of wearables while also adding to the overall user experience. (2018-04-19)

Columbia engineers translate brain signals directly into speech
In a scientific first, Columbia neuroengineers have created a system that translates thought into intelligible, recognizable speech. This breakthrough, which harnesses the power of speech synthesizers and artificial intelligence, could lead to new ways for computers to communicate directly with the brain. It also lays the groundwork for helping people who cannot speak, such as those living with as ALS or recovering from stroke, regain their ability to communicate with the outside world. (2019-01-29)

Cellular stress at the movies
For the first time, biological imaging experts have used a custom fluorescence microscope and a novel antibody tagging tool to watch living cells undergoing stress. (2019-01-25)

Innate immune adaptor TRIF confers neuroprotection in ALS
Researchers led by Nagoya University report that deficiency of the innate immune adaptor TIR domain-containing adaptor inducing interferon-β (TRIF) significantly shortens survival time and accelerates disease progression of ALS mice. They revealed for the first time that the TRIF pathway is involved in eliminating aberrantly activated astrocytes to maintain the microenvironment surrounding motor neurons in ALS mice. This study provides a clue to develop a new therapeutic approach for protecting ALS motor neurons. (2018-04-15)

Antibodies protect nerve-muscle connections in a mouse model of Lou Gehrig's disease
A new study led by NYU School of Medicine researchers identifies a novel treatment strategy that preserved neuromuscular synapses in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. (2018-02-20)

Hi-res view of protein complex shows how it breaks up protein tangles
A new, high-resolution view of the structure of Hsp104 (heat shock protein 104), a natural yeast protein nanomachine with six subunits, may show news ways to dismantle harmful protein clumps in disease. (2017-06-15)

Mutation of the co-chaperone Tsc1 in bladder cancer diminishes Hsp90 acetylation and reduces drug sensitivity and selectivity
The researchers have recently identified the tumor suppressor tuberous sclerosis complex 1 as a new co-chaperone of Hsp90 that affects Hsp90 binding to its inhibitors. Their findings suggest that TSC1 status may predict response to Hsp90 inhibitors in patients with bladder cancer, and co-targeting HDACs can sensitize tumors with Tsc1 mutations to Hsp90 inhibitors. (2019-10-10)

Low muscle strength identified as early risk factor for ALS
Low muscle strength during the later teen years has been identified as a risk factor for much later onset of the neurological disease known as ALS, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. A study at Sahlgrenska Academy published in the Journal of Neurology also links low blood counts at a young age to ALS. (2018-02-02)

NUS scientists develop novel chip for fast and accurate disease detection at low cost
A novel invention by a team of researchers from the National University of Singapore holds promise for a faster and cheaper way to diagnose diseases with high accuracy. Professor Zhang Yong from the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the NUS Faculty of Engineering and his team have developed a tiny microfluidic chip that could effectively detect minute amounts of biomolecules without the need for complex lab equipment. (2018-03-29)

New way to study swallowing could one day lead to improved treatments for ALS
There is no cure for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease, but new findings from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and the University of Missouri College of Veterinary Medicine are deepening researchers' understanding of a common ALS symptom: swallowing problems. (2018-11-14)

TSRI researchers uncover culprit in Parkinson's brain cell die-off
Researchers investigate the connection between misfolded proteins and the destruction of mitochondria in neurons. (2018-03-05)

Protein offers protection against nerve degeneration in ALS model
Increasing the levels of the anti-aging protein hormone Klotho improves the neurological deficits and prolongs life span in an experimental model with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). In addition, brain immune cells called microglia play an important role in protecting the brain against inflammation and, likely, motor neuron loss in this model. (2019-06-27)

CRISPR helps find new genetic suspects behind ALS/FTD
NIH-funded researchers used the gene editing tool CRISPR to rapidly identify genes in the human genome that might modify the severity of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) caused by mutations in a gene called C9orf72. The results of the search uncovered a new set of genes that may hasten neuron death during the disease. (2018-03-12)

University of Leicester announces world first forensic technique
A team led by a University of Leicester forensic pathologist is believed to be the first in the world to use a new radiological approach for mass fatality investigation. (2006-02-24)

Study finds genetic mutation causes 'vicious cycle' in most common form of ALS
University of Michigan-led research brings scientists one step closer to understanding the development of neurodegenerative disorders such as ALS. A study published today in Nature Communications details what the researchers describe as a vicious cycle of toxic protein production set in motion by cell stress. (2017-12-08)

Psoriasis treated with compound derived from immune cells
A compound from the body's own immune cells can treat psoriasis in mice and holds promise for other autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis, according to a new study at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. (2018-04-18)

Drug reverses mental retardation caused by genetic disorder
A new UCLA study shows that the FDA-approved drug rapamycin reverses mental retardation in mice with a genetic disease called tuberous sclerosis complex. Because half of TSC patients also suffer from autism, the findings offer a possible mechanism for addressing learning disorders due to autism. (2008-06-22)

Statins have unexpected effect on pool of powerful brain cells
Cholesterol-lowering drugs known as statins have a profound effect on an elite group of cells known as glial progenitor cells that are important to brain health as we age, scientists have found. The new findings shed light on a long-debated potential role for statins in the area of dementia. (2008-07-03)

Chimpanzees help researchers improve machine learning of animal simulations
Researchers at The University of Manchester are using computer simulations of chimpanzees to improve not only our understanding of how the animals walk, but also the technology we use to do it. (2018-03-06)

Distinct brain rhythms, regions help us reason about categories
The brain's ability to categorize based on straightforward resemblance or on a more abstract similarity arises from its use of distinct rhythms, at distinct times, in distinct parts of the prefrontal cortex. Gamma in one region handles sensory comparisons, but beta in another region considers the less obvious ways things go together. (2018-01-25)

Protein plays Jekyll and Hyde role in Lou Gehrig's disease
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, more commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is a fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by the death of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord that control muscle movements from walking and swallowing to breathing. In a groundbreaking study this week in PLoS Biology, Brandeis and Harvard Medical School scientists report key findings about the cause and occurrence of the familial form of ALS. (2008-07-28)

Potential new approach to the treatment of multiple sclerosis
A prospective new method of treating patients with multiple sclerosis has been proposed by researchers of the Mainz University Medical Center working in cooperation with researchers of the University of Montreal. In model trials and experiments employing human endothelial cells, they discovered that the EGFL7 protein hinders the migration of immune cells into the central nervous system by stabilizing the blood-brain barrier. (2018-03-05)

From black hat to white hat: Findings tip assumptions about TAK1 in muscle growth
Convention was that the signaling protein, transforming growth factor-ß-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) is detrimental to muscle health since it activates pathways associated with muscle wasting. However deactivating TAK1 did not preserve muscle health as expected, but resulted in the opposite effect: muscle wasting. (2018-02-08)

Multiple sclerosis drug could reduce painful side effects of common cancer treatment
Researchers from the Saint Louis University School of Medicine have discovered why many multiple myeloma patients experience severe pain when treated with the anticancer drug bortezomib. The study, which will be published April 27 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that a drug already approved to treat multiple sclerosis could mitigate this effect, allowing myeloma patients to successfully complete their treatment and relieving the pain of myeloma survivors. (2018-04-27)

Children with and without multiple sclerosis have differences in gut bacteria
In a recent study, children with multiple sclerosis had differences in the abundance of specific gut bacteria than children without the disease. Certain types of bacteria were either more or less abundant in children with multiple sclerosis. In particular, there was an association between multiple sclerosis and an increase in gut bacteria that have been linked to inflammation and a decrease in gut bacteria that are considered anti-inflammatory. (2016-05-16)

Disease diagnosis in just 15 minutes
Testing for diseases such as cancer and multiple sclerosis could soon be as simple as using a pregnancy testing kit. A team led by scientists at the University of Leeds has developed a biosensor technology that uses antibodies to detect biomarkers - molecules in the human body which are often a marker for disease -- much faster than current testing methods. (2008-10-01)

Scientists identified earthquake faults in Sichuan, China
Only last summer research published by earth scientists in the international journal Tectonics concluded that geological faults in the Sichuan Basin, China, (2008-05-16)

Changing size of neurons could shed light on new treatments for motor neurone disease
New research published in The Journal of Physiology improves our understanding of how motor nerve cells (neurons) respond to motor neurone disease, which could help us identify new treatment options. (2018-03-04)

Do career NFL players have a higher risk of death?
Career players in the National Football League (NFL) had slightly higher rates of death that were not statistically different from those of replacement players who made only a few appearances during a short league strike in the 1980s. (2018-02-01)

Fracking the immune system
Researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center are the first to report links between early life exposure to chemicals in ground water near fracking sites and immune system imbalances in mice. Their findings suggest that exposure to these chemicals during development may adversely affect the immune system's ability to fight diseases like multiple sclerosis later in life. (2018-05-01)

New treatment lenebasum shows promise for diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis (dcSSc)
The results of an open label extension of a phase II study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2018) demonstrate that lenabasum continues to have acceptable safety and tolerability in diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis (dcSSc) with no severe or serious adverse events (AE). (2018-06-15)

Adult-onset neurodegeneration has roots in early development
The roots of a progressive degenerative disease begin much earlier than previously thought, according to a recent Northwestern Medicine study. (2018-03-30)

Hundreds of thousands of genomes shed light on psychiatric disorders
A massive undertaking by the Brainstorm Consortium to analyze the genomes of nearly 900,000 people has revealed important insights into the genetic overlap among some psychiatric diseases, as well as among personality traits. (2018-06-21)

Nature of immune cells in the human brain disclosed
Researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience and Amsterdam UMC have disclosed the nature of how T cells protect the brain against harmful viruses. The results of the study, which are published in Nature Communications, are important for investigating the role of the immune system in numerous brain disorders. (2018-11-02)

New hope for multiple sclerosis sufferers
A drug which was developed in Cambridge and initially designed to treat a form of leukemia has also proven effective against combating the debilitating neurological disease multiple sclerosis. (2008-10-22)

PET detects neuroinflammation in multiple sclerosis
The triggers of autoimmune inflammation in multiple sclerosis (MS) have eluded scientists for many years, but molecular imaging is bringing researchers closer to identifying them, while providing a means of evaluating next-generation therapies for MS, say researchers introducing a study at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging. (2016-06-12)

New biomarkers of multiple sclerosis pathogenesis
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic debilitating inflammatory disease targeting the brain. The pathogenesis of MS remains largely unknown. It is believed that brain tissue damage is due to immune cells targeting and breaking up the myelin basic protein (MBP), which is essential for nerve cells function. (2017-05-19)

Scientists discover a key function of als-linked protein
The protein FUS, whose mutation or disruption causes many cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), works as a central component of one of the most important regulatory systems in cells, according to a new study in Molecular Cell from scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. (2018-03-08)

Early weight loss in Parkinson's disease patients may signify more serious form of disease
A study led by a Massachusetts General Hospital investigator finds evidence of an association between weight loss in patients with early Parkinson's disease and more rapid disease progression. While weight loss is common in Parkinson's patients, results of the study could suggest that weight loss early in the course of the disease signifies a more serious form of the neurodegenerative disorder. (2016-01-11)

Tickling the brain with electrical stimulation improves memory, study shows
Tickling the brain with low-intensity electrical stimulation in a specific area can improve verbal short-term memory. Mayo Clinic researchers report their findings in Brain. (2018-01-29)

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