Popular Ancient Ohio Trail News and Current Events

Popular Ancient Ohio Trail News and Current Events, Ancient Ohio Trail News Articles.
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Older than the moon
Geochemist Matt Jackson finds that only the hottest, most buoyant mantle plumes draw from a primordial reservoir deep in the Earth. (2017-02-06)

Science reveals improvements in Roman building techniques
In research published in EPJ Plus, researchers have carried out scientific analysis of the materials used to build the Atrium Vestae in Rome. They found that successive phases of modification to the building saw improvements, including higher quality raw materials, higher brick firing temperatures, and better ratios between carbonate and silicate building materials. (2019-10-25)

Prehistoric AC
Tyrannosaurus rex, one of the largest meat-eating dinosaurs on the planet, had an air conditioner in its head, suggest scientists from the University of Missouri, Ohio University and University of Florida, while challenging over a century of previous beliefs. (2019-09-04)

Study uncovers key to preventing back pain in runners
Low back pain is a common complaint among both elite and recreational runners, but the true cause of it remains a mystery. So researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center used motion capture technology to observe how a runner's muscles work while they're in motion. (2018-01-03)

What did Earth's ancient magnetic field look like?
New work from Carnegie's Peter Driscoll suggests Earth's ancient magnetic field was significantly different than the present day field, originating from several poles rather than the familiar two. Then, shortly after our planet's core solidified, Driscoll's work predicts that Earth's magnetic field transitioned to a 'strong,' two-pole one. (2016-06-24)

Meteorite bombardment likely to have created the Earth's oldest rocks
Scientists have found that 4.02 billion year old silica-rich felsic rocks from the Acasta River, Canada -- the oldest rock formation known on Earth -- probably formed at high temperatures and at a surprisingly shallow depth of the planet's nascent crust. The high temperatures needed to melt the shallow crust were likely caused by a meteorite bombardment around half a billion years after the planet formed. (2018-08-13)

Research reveals evidence of new population of ancient Native Americans
Genetic analysis of ancient DNA from a 6-week-old infant found at an Interior Alaska archaeological site has revealed a previously unknown population of ancient people in North America. The findings, published in the Jan. 3 edition of the journal Nature, represent a major shift in scientists' theories about how humans populated North America. The researchers have named the new group 'Ancient Beringians.' (2018-01-03)

Forensic science used to determine who's who in pre-Columbian Peru
Analysis of ancient mitochondrial DNA has been used to establish migration and population patterns for American indigenous cultures during the time before Christopher Columbus sailed to the Americas. New research published in BioMed Central's open-access journal BMC Genetics has used more detailed DNA analysis of individuals from Arequipa region to identify the family relationships and burial traditions of ancient Peru. (2012-04-22)

People with epilepsy: Tell us about rare risk of death
People with epilepsy want their health care providers to tell them about a rare risk of death associated with the disorder, according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 69th Annual Meeting in Boston, April 22 to 28, 2017. (2017-02-23)

Promising gene replacement therapy moves forward at Ohio State
Research led by Dr. Krystof Bankiewicz, who recently joined The Ohio State University College of Medicine, shows that gene replacement therapy for Niemann-Pick type A disease is safe for use in nonhuman primates and has therapeutic effects in mice. These findings will publish online in the journal Science Translational Medicine. Prior to joining Ohio State as a professor of neurosurgery, Bankiewicz conducted this translational gene therapy research at the University of California at San Francisco. (2019-08-21)

Strange bacteria hint at ancient origin of photosynthesis
Structures inside rare bacteria are similar to those that power photosynthesis in plants today, suggesting the process is older than assumed. (2019-07-25)

Paleogenomics -- the prehistory of modern dogs
An international team of scientists has used ancient DNA samples to elucidate the population history of dogs. The results show that dogs had already diverged into at least five distinct lineages by about 11,000 years ago and that their early population history only partially reflects that of human groups. (2020-11-06)

When scientists push people to their tipping point
You probably overestimate just how far someone can push you before you reach your tipping point, new research suggests. A new study tilted people backwards in a device and asked them at what point they thought they would fall if they weren't supported. Most people would have fallen long before they thought they would. (2018-12-10)

How wasp and bee stinger designs help deliver the pain
Next time you're stung by a wasp or a honeybee, consider the elegantly designed stinger that caused you so much pain. In a new study, researchers found that the stingers of the two species are about five times softer at the tip than at the base to make it easier to pierce skin. The stingers are harder closer to the insect's body so they don't bend too much, or break, as you yelp in agony. (2018-10-08)

Celebrity fossil reveals all for science
With the help of an artist, a geology professor at Lund University in Sweden has figuratively speaking breathed life into one of science's most well-known fossil species; Agnostus pisiformis. The trilobite-like arthropod lived in huge numbers in Scandinavia a half-billion years ago. Today, this extinct species provides important clues for science in several ways. (2017-09-15)

More than 1,000 ancient sealings discovered
Classical scholars from the Cluster of Excellence discover a large number of sealings in southeast Turkey. More than 1,000 sealings give new insights into the Greco-Roman pantheon. The finds were in a late antique building complex point to a hitherto unknown church. (2017-12-07)

Jurassic pain: Giant 'flea-like' insects plagued dinosaurs 165 million years ago
It takes a gutsy insect to sneak up on a huge dinosaur while it sleeps, crawl onto its soft underbelly and give it a bite that might have felt like a needle going in -- but giant (2012-05-01)

Fifty years after the Cuyahoga conflagration
On June 22, 1969, the Cuyahoga River, which flows through Cleveland, Ohio, caught fire. Although firefighters extinguished the blaze within 30 minutes, the shocking event helped galvanize the US environmental movement. Fifty years later, the river is much healthier but still recuperating from a legacy of pollution, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. (2019-06-19)

How a 'shadow zone' traps the world's oldest ocean water
New research from an international team has revealed why the oldest water in the ocean in the North Pacific has remained trapped in a shadow zone around 2km below the sea surface for over 1000 years. (2017-11-10)

First transcatheter implant for diastolic heart failure successful
Researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center have come up with a new device, proven safe and effective, to treat diastolic heart failure. (2017-11-15)

Exceptional new titanosaur from middle Cretaceous Tanzania: Mnyamawamtuka
An exceptional sauropod dinosaur specimen from the middle Cretaceous of Tanzania represents a unique species and provides new insights into sauropod evolution, according to a study published Feb. 13, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Eric Gorscak of Midwestern University, Illinois, and Patrick O'Connor of Ohio University, USA. (2019-02-13)

Study looks at the prevalence, challenges of athletes with ADHD
It's estimated there are more than six million children in the United States with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). There has been a lot of research about the impact ADHD can have on students in the classroom, but much less is known about how ADHD might impact athletes on the field of play. (2017-05-11)

The big star that couldn't become a supernova
For the first time in history, astronomers have been able to watch as a dying star was reborn as a black hole. It went out with a whimper instead of a bang. (2017-05-25)

Climate, grasses and teeth -- the evolution of South America mammals
Grass-eating mammals, including armadillos as big as Volkswagens, became more diverse in South America about 6 million years ago because shifts in atmospheric circulation drove changes in climate and vegetation, according to new research. About 7 to 6 million years ago, the global tropical atmospheric circulation known as the Hadley circulation intensified. The climate of South America became drier, subtropical grasslands expanded and the numbers of mammal species that were good at eating grasses increased. (2019-04-29)

Supernova observation first of its kind using NASA satellite
Their research, detailed in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, represents the first published findings about a supernova observed using TESS, and add new insights to long-held theories about the elements left behind after a white dwarf star explodes into a supernova. (2019-07-16)

URI, IAA archaeologists discover shipwrecks, ancient harbor on coast of Israel
A team of archaeologists have discovered the remains of a fleet of early-19th century ships and ancient harbor structures from the Hellenistic period at the city of Akko, one of the major ancient ports of the eastern Mediterranean. The findings shed light on a period of history that is little known and point to how and where additional remains may be found. (2012-11-28)

Radiologists attempt to solve mystery of Tut's demise
Egyptian radiologists who performed the first-ever computed tomography (CT) evaluation of King Tutankhamun's mummy believe they have solved the mystery of how the ancient pharaoh died. The CT images and results of their study were presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America. (2006-11-27)

Exploring environmental and technological effects on culture evolution at different spatial scales
The trajectory and dynamics of ancient social evolution in human history is a widely concerned issue. Based on the comprehensive analysis of case studies on the rise and fall of ancient civilizations in relation to climate change and technological innovations, researchers in Lanzhou discuss environmental and technological effects on culture evolution at different spatial scales, as well as possible mechanism behind it. This research has been published in the updating special topic entitled (2017-12-29)

Jurassic crocodile discovery sheds light on reptiles' family tree
A 150 million-year-old fossil has been identified as a previously unseen species of ancient crocodile that developed a tail fin and paddle-like limbs for life in the sea. (2019-04-04)

The drought that collapsed classic Maya society
A period of severe drought near the end of the 1st millennium C.E. likely sealed the fate of Lowland Classic Maya society, and a new study shows just how dry it was as the populations of the Maya Lowlands began to evaporate. (2018-08-02)

Aging can be good for you (if you're a yeast)
It's a cheering thought for anyone heading towards their golden years. Research from the Babraham Institute has shown that aging can be beneficial -- albeit so far only in yeast. (2017-03-01)

Children can have a better memory than adults (at least sometimes)
Believe it or not, a 5-year-old could beat most adults on a recognition memory test, at least under specific conditions, according to a new study. These findings run counter to what has been known for years from memory research - namely, that memory develops from early childhood to young adulthood, with young adults having much better memory than children. (2004-07-21)

Ancient human population histories revealed in Central and South America
The first high quality ancient DNA data from Central and South America -- 49 individuals some as old as 11,000 years -- has revealed a major and previously unknown exchanges between populations. For the first time, researchers have archaeological and genetic evidence linking some of the oldest humans in Central America to the earliest known populations to arrive in the New World. (2018-11-09)

Study explores safety of rear-facing car seats in rear impact car crashes
Experts know that rear-facing car seats protect infants and toddlers in front and side impact crashes, but they are rarely discussed when it comes to rear-impact collisions. Because rear-impact crashes account for more than 25 percent of all accidents, researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center conducted a new study to explore the effectiveness of rear-facing car seats in this scenario. (2018-04-03)

Preschool teachers ask children too many simple questions
When preschool teachers read books in their classrooms, the questions they ask play a key role in how much children learn, research has shown. But a new study that involved observing teachers during class story times found that they asked few questions -- and those that they did ask were usually too simple. (2019-07-25)

Ohio University study shows high number of concussion-related symptoms in performing arts
A recent study released by the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine shows a stunning number of participants not only experienced concussion-related symptoms and head impacts but also continued performing either without reporting the incident or without receiving the recommended care. These participants were not taking part in any sporting contest at the time, however. They are theater personnel. (2018-04-03)

Ink from ancient Egyptian papyri contains copper
Until recently, it was assumed that the ink used for writing was primarily carbon-based at least until the fourth and fifth centuries AD. But in a new University of Copenhagen study, analyses of 2,000-year-old papyri fragments with X-ray microscopy show that black ink used by Egyptian scribes also contained copper -- an element previously not identified in ancient ink. (2017-11-10)

Clean plates much more common when we eat at home
When people eat at home, there's typically not much left on their plates - and that means there's likely less going to landfills, according to new research from The Ohio State University. (2018-02-14)

Scientists analyze first ancient human DNA from Southeast Asia
Harvard Medical School researchers lead the first whole-genome analysis of ancient human DNA from Southeast Asia Study identifies at least three major waves of human migration into the region over the last 50,000 years, each shaping the genetics of Southeast Asia (2018-05-17)

Ancient Rome: a 12,000-year history of genetic flux, migrations and diversity
Scholars have been all over Rome for hundreds of years, but it still holds some secrets - for instance, relatively little is known about where the city's denizens actually came from. Now, an international team led by Researchers from the University of Vienna, Stanford University and Sapienza University of Rome, is filling in the gaps with a genetic history that shows just how much the Eternal City's populace mirrored its sometimes tumultuous history. (2019-11-08)

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