Popular Antidepressants News and Current Events

Popular Antidepressants News and Current Events, Antidepressants News Articles.
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Russian chemists developed a way to synthesize drugs from renewable precursors
The scientists of RUDN University together with their Russian colleagues have developed a new approach to the synthesis of benzofurans from cheap raw materials. Original furans can be produced from wastes of agriculture and wooworking industry, such as sawdust, cobs and other by-products of crop production. The results of the work were described in the article published in Tetrahedron. (2017-11-14)

New study on the placebo effect and antidepressants in children and adolescents
Although the clinical efficacy of antidepressants in children and adolescents is proven, it is frequently accompanied by side effects. In addition, the influence of the placebo effect on the efficacy of antidepressants is unclear. A meta-analysis of data from over 6,500 patients has now shown that, although antidepressants are more effective than placebos, the difference is minor and varies according to the type of mental disorder. (2017-09-15)

Studies suggest inflammatory cytokines are associated with depression and psychosis, and that anti-cytokine treatment can reduce depression symptoms
Studies presented at this year's International Early Psychosis Association meeting in Milan, Italy, (Oct. 20-22) suggest that increased levels of inflammatory cytokines are associated with increased rates of depression and psychosis, and that treatment to reduce cytokine levels can reduce symptoms of depression. (2016-10-20)

New drug shows potential as a different kind of antidepressant in mouse trials
A potential new antidepressant and antianxiety treatment with a unique mechanism of action has been developed by scientists at the University of Bath. (2017-11-06)

Cocktail tests on toxic waste called for
Surprisingly low concentrations of toxic chemicals -- from fungicides to antidepressants -- can change the way some aquatic creatures swim and feed, according to new research. In addition, depending on the cocktail of toxins they can produce unexpected results. (2017-10-16)

Some patients stop needing antidepressant medication after having plastic surgery
It has been proven that plastic surgery can improve self-esteem, but can it also act as a natural mood enhancer? A significant number of patients stopped taking antidepressant medication after undergoing plastic surgery, according to a study presented today at the American Society of Plastic Surgeons Plastic Surgery 2006 conference in San Francisco. (2006-10-08)

Treating SSRI-resistant depression
When your antidepressant medication does not work, should you switch to a different medication from the same class or should you try an antidepressant medication that has a different mechanism of action? This is the question asked by researchers in a new report scheduled for publication in Biological Psychiatry on April 1. (2008-03-25)

CCNY study explores a novel candidate for antidepressant treatment
A recent paper published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry explores how a protein named CK2 could play a key role in the formulation of new antidepressants that work more efficiently and faster for more people. (2018-01-17)

Correlation of stroke and dementia with death: A study from the Swedish dementia registry
Patients who died of IS the most common type of dementia was vascular dementia while those died from other causes were most often diagnosed with Alzheimer's dementia (AD). Patients who died from IS and were registered in Riksstroke had higher MMSE score compared to other groups. Patients who died from IS took more cardiovascular medications. There were no differences in the use of antipsychotics, antidepressants, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, memantine, anxiolytics, or hypnotics between the groups. (2018-12-14)

New UC study may help guide treatment of pediatric anxiety
Researchers from the University of Cincinnati looked at common medications prescribed for children and adolescents with anxiety disorders, to determine the most effective and best-tolerated. This study revealed that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) performed best overall. The results, available online in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, include the largest amount of data to date for analyses of pediatric anxiety disorder treatments. (2019-02-01)

Ketamine acts fast to treat depression and its effects last -- but how?
Researchers led by Mark Rasenick in the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine, describe the molecular mechanisms behind ketamine's ability to squash depression and keep it at bay. They report their findings in the journal Molecular Psychiatry. (2018-06-21)

Antidepressant use increases hip fracture risk among elderly
Antidepressant use nearly doubles the risk of hip fracture among community-dwelling persons with Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. The increased risk was highest at the beginning of antidepressant use and remained elevated even four years later. The findings were published in the International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. (2017-01-11)

Kicking, yelling during sleep? Study finds risk factors for violent sleep disorder
Taking antidepressants for depression, having post-traumatic stress disorder or anxiety diagnosed by a doctor are risk factors for a disruptive and sometimes violent sleep disorder called rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder, according to a study published in the Dec. 26, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also found men are more likely to have the disorder. (2018-12-26)

Symptoms of depression before undergoing heart procedure and outcomes
Symptoms of depression were common among older adults undergoing a procedure to replace a damaged aortic valve of the heart, and having those symptoms was associated with a higher rate of death up to one year later. (2018-01-17)

Researchers discover a critical receptor involved in response to antidepressants like ketamine
Effective treatment of clinical depression remains a major mental health issue, with roughly 30 percent of patients who do not respond to any of the available treatments. Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have discovered a crucial receptor called mGlu2 that is critical to the mechanism of fast-acting antidepressants such as ketamine when used to treat depression. (2019-03-28)

Kaiser Permanente study finds cognitive behavioral therapy is cost-effective
Cognitive behavioral therapy (or CBT) delivered in a primary care setting is a cost-effective way to treat adolescents with depression who decline or quickly stop using antidepressants, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published today in the journal Pediatrics. (2018-01-19)

Depressed people have an increased risk of atrial fibrillation
Depressed people have an increased risk of atrial fibrillation, according to a study published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a European Society of Cardiology (ESC) journal.1 Medication was not responsible for the high frequency of atrial fibrillation in depressed people. The findings are reported during Global AF Aware Week. (2018-11-20)

Depression during pregnancy can double risk of preterm delivery
Depressed pregnant women have twice the risk of preterm delivery than pregnant women with no symptoms of depression, finds a Kaiser Permanente study in Oxford University Press's journal Human Reproduction. The study, which is among the first to examine depression and pre-term delivery in a diverse population, provides a clear look at the link between depression and preterm delivery because the majority of the women in the study did not use anti-depressants. (2008-10-23)

Study examines risk, risk factors for depression after stroke
During the first three months after stroke, the risk for depression was eight times higher than in a reference population of people without stroke, according to an article published online by JAMA Psychiatry. (2016-09-07)

Pilot study shows that neurofeedback may help treatment-resistant depression
A small pilot study has indicated that neurofeedback -- where patients concentrate on modifying their own brainwave patterns -- has potential to treat many of the 100 million people worldwide who suffer from treatment-resistant depression (TRD). This is the first time that neurofeedback has been shown to improve both individual symptoms and overall recovery in TRD. (2017-09-02)

After hip-replacement surgery, medication use decreases
A new study in the journal PAIN® provides information on the trajectories of prescription drug use before and after hip-replacement surgery -- total hip arthroplasty (THA), one of the most common types of joint replacement surgery. Hip-replacement surgery is commonly followed by long-term reductions in the use of prescription drugs for pain and insomnia. But use of these medications increases during the year before hip replacement -- and jumps even higher in the period immediately after surgery. (2015-12-01)

Prenatal exposures to medication affecting brain neurotransmitter systems and risk of ASD
An exploratory study that examined autism spectrum disorder (ASD) risk and prenatal exposure to medications that affect neurotransmitters, including the typical targets of antidepressants and antipsychotics, suggests that most medications weren't associated with higher estimates of ASD risk. The study used data from a large health maintenance organization in Israel for an analytic sample that included 34 groups of medications and 96,249 children, including 1,405 with ASD. (2018-10-31)

Getting help for depression and anxiety has significant long-term benefits
University of Alberta researcher Ian Colman and his team performed a study to see the long term effects of taking antidepressants or anti-anxiety medications. They found people who were not using antidepressants or anti-anxiety medications were three times more likely to be suffering from depression or anxiety 10 years later. (2008-10-01)

Depressed with a chronic disease? Consider alternative therapies
Scientists are finding more evidence that commonly prescribed antidepressants aren't effective in people battling both depression and a chronic medical disease, raising a critical question of whether doctors should enact widespread changes in how they treat millions of depressed Americans. (2017-11-06)

Drug combination for treatment resistant depression no more effective than single
A large clinical trial published in the British Medical Journal today, looked at the effectiveness of adding mirtazapine to an SSRI or SNRI in patients who remain depressed after at least six weeks of conventional (SSRI or SNRI) antidepressant treatment. They found that this combination was no more effective in improving depression than placebo and call on doctors to rethink its use. (2018-11-01)

Study shows contrasting long-term cognitive effects of psychiatric drugs in schizophrenia
A long-term study has found that low cumulative exposure to benzodiazepine and antidepressant medications does not seem to affect cognition in schizophrenia. However, long-term high-dose use of antipsychotic drugs seemed to be associated with poorer cognition, whereas a relatively long break in antipsychotic use was associated with better cognitive functioning. (2017-09-05)

Long-term effects of pre-birth exposure to anti-depressants 12 years later
This study investigates the complex relationships between pre-birth exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants, and thinking and attention skills in 12-year-olds. (2018-05-05)

Heart attack patients more depressed but get less antidepressants
Heart attack patients are more depressed but are less often prescribed antidepressants than people who have not had a heart attack, according to research presented today at EuroHeartCare 2016 by Dr. Barbro Kjellström, a researcher at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden. (2016-04-16)

New study rebuts the claim that antidepressants do not work
A theory that has gained considerable attention in international media, including Newsweek and the CBS broadcast 60 minutes, suggest that antidepressant drugs, such as the SSRIs, do not exert any actual antidepressant effect. A research group at the Sahlgrenska Academy has now analyzed data from clinical trials and can rebut this theory. (2017-08-18)

Study challenges previous findings that antidepressants affect breastfeeding
New research does not support the previously observed negative impacts of antidepressant use on breastfeeding. (2018-03-26)

A tool based on the use ofcarbon nanoparticles enables detection of antidepressants in urine samples
The test can be used to monitor therapeutic dosages, for cases of intoxication due to overdose or at a forensic level. (2018-04-10)

Mild cognitive impairment patients take about 3 medications for concomittant diseases
Dr. Vasileios Papaliagkas, the corresponding author of the paper, pointed that the vast majority of MCI patients were taking at least one medication, whereas slightly less than half of the patients (40 percent) took at least four medications. The types of medications that were most often taken for concomitant diseases were cardiovascular drugs, antidepressants, sedatives, thyroid drugs and anti-diabetic drugs. (2016-11-14)

Antidepressants and bladder medicines linked to dementia in landmark study
Long-term use of some anticholinergic medications are associated with an increased risk of dementia -- according to a new study led by the University of East Anglia (UK). (2018-04-25)

Certain drugs for muscle conditions may be linked to increased risk of dementia
Use of certain anticholinergic drugs -- that help to control involuntary muscle movements for conditions such as Parkinson's disease -- is associated with an increased risk of dementia, finds a UK study published by The BMJ today. (2018-04-25)

Research Brief: Older adults often prescribed meds linked to higher side effect risks
Drugs with high-risk anticholinergic properties can lead to risks of developing serious adverse events, such as cognitive impairment, falls, dementia, and even mortality in older adults. Yet, relatively little is known about prescribing trends of high-risk anticholinergic medications in the United States of America. Researchers in the University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy conducted a repeated cross-sectional analysis of the 2006-2015 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey to understand more. (2018-03-27)

Using antidepressants during pregnancy may affect your child's mental health
A study from Aarhus BSS of almost one million Danish children shows that the use of antidepressants during pregnancy increases the risk of your child being diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder later in life. However, heritability also plays a part, according to the researchers. (2017-09-07)

Certain antidepressants linked to heightened risk of mania and bipolar disorder
Taking certain antidepressants for depression is linked to a heightened risk of subsequent mania and bipolar disorder, reveals research published in the online journal BMJ Open. (2015-12-15)

Postpartum depression risk, duration and recurrence
Postpartum affective disorder (AD), including postpartum depression (PPD), affects more than one in two hundred women with no history of prior psychiatric episodes, and raises the risk of later affective disorder for those women, according to a new study published in PLOS Medicine by Marie-Louise Rasmussen from Statens Serum Institut, Denmark, and colleagues. (2017-09-26)

Study suggests new treatment approach needed for management of depression with bipolar disorder
In a study published in The American Journal of Psychiatry, a team of researchers led by Mayo Clinic psychiatrist Mark Frye, M.D., attempted to identify what factors make some people with bipolar depression more likely to experience treatment-emergent mania. (2009-02-11)

Why do antidepressants take so long to work?
An episode of major depression can be crippling, impairing the ability to sleep, work, or eat. But the drugs available to treat depression can take weeks or even months to start working. Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have discovered one reason the drugs take so long to work, and their finding could help scientists develop faster-acting drugs in the future. The research was published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry. (2016-07-28)

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