Popular Ants News and Current Events

Popular Ants News and Current Events, Ants News Articles.
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Insect food webs
Biological diversity stabilizes species interactions. (2019-03-06)

The way a fish swims reveals a lot about its personality, say scientists
Personality has been described in all sorts of animal species, from ants to apes. Some individuals are shy and sedentary, while others are bold and active. Now a new study published in Ecology and Evolution has revealed that the way a fish swims tells us a lot about its personality. (2021-02-23)

Fussy eating prevents mongoose family feuds
Mongooses living in large groups develop 'specialist' diets so they don't have to fight over food, new research shows. (2018-03-14)

Expanding tropical forest spells disaster for conservation
A North Carolina State University study shows that fire suppression efforts in Brazilian savannas turn many of those areas into forest lands, with negative consequences for the plants and animals that live there. (2017-08-30)

Why bees soared and slime flopped as inspirations for systems engineering
Honeybees gathering nectar inspired an algorithm that eased the burden of host servers handling unpredictable traffic by about 25 percent. Nature can inspire some great engineering, but it can also lead to some flops. Take slime mold: Standard algorithms beat it hands down to model connectivity. AAAS annual meeting presentation by systems researcher Craig Tovey. (2018-02-18)

Crunch time for food security
Insects have been a valuable source of nutritional protein for centuries, as both food and feed. The challenge now is to broaden their appeal, safely and sustainably (2017-11-10)

Unravelling the costs of rubber agriculture on biodiversity
A striking decline in ant biodiversity found on land converted to a rubber plantation in China. (2016-05-16)

The social evolution of termites
Similar genes involved in the evolution of insect societies as in bees and ants. (2018-02-07)

Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History reveals ants as fungus farmers
It turns out ants, like humans, are true farmers. The difference is that ants are farming fungus. Entomologists Ted Schultz and Seán Brady at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History have published a paper in the March 24 issue of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, providing new insight into the agricultural abilities of ants and how these abilities have evolved throughout time. (2008-03-24)

New 'big-armed fly' species named after former California governor Arnold Schwarzenegger
A new fly species with bulging forelegs is named after former California governor and famous bodybuilder and actor Arnold Schwarzenegger. Measuring 0.395 mm in body length, it is also now the smallest known fly. Entomologist Brian Brown explains he named it for Schwarzenegger, apart from its 'bulging legs,' in tribute to the inspirational role the celebrity had in the scientist's teenage years. His research article is published in the open access Biodiversity Data Journal. (2018-01-24)

Controlling fire ants with natural compounds
New research published in eNeuro has identified natural, plant-derived that repel fire ants. These compounds, including one found in cinnamon, work by activating a type of ion channel highly expressed in the antennae and leg of one of the world's most invasive insect species. (2018-02-05)

Temperature drives biodiversity
Why is the diversity of animals and plants so unevenly distributed on our planet? An international research team headed by the University of Würzburg has provided new data on this core issue of ecology. They found biodiversity to be driven by temperature. (2016-12-22)

Multiple ant-like transport of neuronal cargo by motor proteins
Microtubules (roads made of proteins) extend throughout a cell for motor proteins (carriers) to deliver neuronal cargo packed with many kinds of materials required for life activity. (2018-02-02)

Are red imported fire ants all bad?
Red imported fire ants have earned a justifiably bad rap across the south and most Texans would be hard put to name a single redeeming quality the ants have. (2016-10-04)

For global invasion, Argentine ants use chemical weapons
In a paper published today in Scientific Reports, researchers at the University of California, Riverside show how Argentine ants use chemical secretions as weapons in their interactions with harvester ants, which are native to California. The findings could help in the development of new pest control strategies. (2018-01-24)

Fire ants are emerging nuisance for Virginians
Red imported fire ants, which have caused trouble in Florida and Texas for decades, are advancing in Virginia. Virginia Tech scientists are trying to learn more about the increasing number of fire ant infestations. (2007-05-24)

Stuck in a Polish nuclear weapon bunker cannibal wood ants found the way home
Coming back to their 2016 study of a wood ant colony of workers trapped in a post-Soviet nuclear weapon bunker in Poland, a research team, led by Prof. Wojciech Czechowski from the Museum and Institute of Zoology, Polish Academy of Sciences, sought to determine how exactly the unexpected colony managed to survive for so long. As a result, their new paper, also published in the open-access Journal of Hymenoptera Research, reports cannibalism within the colony. (2019-11-04)

Ants find their way even while traveling backward
Some of us struggle to find our way back home while walking from an unfamiliar location in the usual, forward direction. Now imagine if you had to stay on the right path while walking backward or even spinning around and around. Now researchers reporting in Current Biology on Jan. 19 have found that ants can do exactly that. They also have new insight into the mental gymnastics required. (2017-01-19)

Using seaweed to kill invasive ants
Scientists at the University of California, Riverside have developed an inexpensive, biodegradable, seaweed-based ant bait that can help homeowners and farmers control invasive Argentine ant populations. (2017-05-18)

New ant species from Borneo explodes to defend its colony
When their colony is threatened by an intruder, workers of a newly discovered species of ant can actually tear their own body apart, in order to release toxins and either kill or hold off the enemy. Discovered by an interdisciplinary team of researchers from Austria, Thailand and Brunei, the new species is the first of the so-called 'exploding ants' to be described since 1935. The study is published in the open-access journal ZooKeys. (2018-04-19)

Critical gaps in our knowledge of where infectious diseases occur
Today Scientists have called for action. The scientific journal Nature Ecology & Evolution have published a joint statement from scientists at Center for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate, University of Copenhagen and North Carolina State University. The scientists call attention to a serious lack of data on the worldwide distribution of disease-causing organisms. Without this knowledge, predicting where and when the next disease outbreak will emerge is hardly possible. Macroecologists hold the expertise to create the needed data network and close the knowledge gaps. (2017-06-22)

For ants, unity is strength -- and health
When a pathogen enters their colony, ants change their behavior to avoid the outbreak of disease. In this way, they protect the queen, brood and young workers from becoming ill. These results, from a study carried out in collaboration between the groups of Sylvia Cremer at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) and of Laurent Keller at the University of Lausanne, are published today in the journal Science. (2018-11-22)

Food-carrying ants use collective problem solving to get through or around obstacles
Ants working together to carry a large piece of food get around obstacles by switching between two types of motion: one that favors squeezing the morsel through a hole and another to seek a path around the barrier. Jonathan Ron of the Weizmann Institute, Israel, and colleagues present these findings in PLOS Computational Biology. (2018-05-10)

First mutant ants shed light on evolution of social behavior
Scientists disrupted a gene essential for sensing pheromones, resulting in severe deficiencies in the ants' social behaviors and their ability to survive within a colony. (2017-08-10)

Desert ants cannot be fooled
Cataglyphis fortis desert ants can learn visual or olfactory cues to pinpoint their nest, but only if these cues are unique to specify the nest entrance. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, discovered that the insects ignore visual landmarks or odors as nest-defining cues, if these occur not only near the nest but also along the route. Hence, ants are able to evaluate the informative value of such cues. (2017-11-22)

Lazy ants make themselves useful in unexpected ways
Sizable populations of inactive workers in ant colonies have puzzled scientists for a long time. However, new research by UA biologists shows that these ants are far from useless. (2017-09-08)

Ants and epiphytes: A longstanding relationship
The first farmers on the Fijian archipelago were ants: For millions of years, an ant species on the islands has nurtured epiphytes, which provide them with nesting sites. Moreover, the interaction is vital for the survival of both partners. (2016-11-21)

Parasitic plants rely on unusual method to spread their seeds
Three species of non-photosynthetic plants rely mainly on camel crickets to disperse their seeds, according to new research from Project Associate Professor Suetsugu Kenji (Kobe University Graduate School of Science). These findings were published on Nov. 9 in the online edition of New Phytologist. (2017-11-14)

Urban biodiversity: Remarkable diversity of small animals in Basel gardens
Gardens in urban areas can harbor a remarkable diversity of species. This has been found by researchers from the University of Basel in a field study carried out with the support of private garden owners from the Basel region. Furthermore, the research team shows that nature-friendly garden management and design can largely compensate for the negative effects of urbanization on biodiversity. The study will be presented at the public conference 'Nature conservation in and around Basel' on Feb. 1, 2019. (2019-01-30)

Study of fungi-insect relationships may lead to new evolutionary discoveries
Zombie ants are only one of the fungi-insect relationships studied by a team of Penn State biologists in a newly compiled database of insect fungi interactions. (2016-05-24)

How invasive species threaten bats
A new review is the first to describe the scope of threats to bats by invasive species. (2017-08-30)

Camponotini ant species have their own distinct microbiomes
Camponotini ant species have their own distinct microbiomes and the bacteria may also vary by developmental stage, according to a study published Nov. 22, 2017, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Manuela Oliveira Ramalho from the Universidade Estadual Paulista 'Júlio de Mesquita Filho,' Brazil, and colleagues. (2017-11-22)

Even small changes within an ecosystem can have detrimental effects
A mutualistic relationship between species in an ecosystem allows for the ecosystem to thrive, but the lack of this relationship could lead to the collapse of the entire system. New research from Binghamton University, State University of New York reveals that interactions between relatively small organisms are crucial to mutualistic relationships in an ecosystem dominated by much larger organisms, including trees and elephants. (2018-02-01)

Without 46 million year-old bacteria, turtle ants would need more bite and less armor
Socially transmitted, nitrogen-providing microbes have opened a new ecological frontier for herbivorous turtle ants. (2018-03-06)

Climate change forced zombie ant fungi to adapt
Zombie ants clamp on to aerial vegetation and hang for months spewing the spores of their parasitic fungi, but researchers noticed that they do not always clamp on to the same part of the plant. Now the researchers know that the choice of leaves or twigs is related to climate and that climate change forced the fungi to adapt to local conditions. (2018-05-29)

Ants fight plant diseases
New research from Aarhus University shows that ants inhibit at least 14 different plant diseases. The small insects secrete antibiotics from glands in the body. On their legs and body, they also host colonies of bacteria that secrete antibiotics. It is probably these substances that inhibit a number of different diseases and researchers now hope to find biological pesticides that may conquer resistant plant diseases. (2019-10-17)

Birds eat 400 to 500 million tonnes of insects annually
Birds around the world eat 400 to 500 million metric tonnes of beetles, flies, ants, moths, aphids, grasshoppers, crickets and other anthropods per year. These numbers have been calculated in a study led by Martin Nyffeler of the University of Basel in Switzerland. The research, published in Springer's journal The Science of Nature, highlights the important role birds play in keeping plant-eating insect populations under control. (2018-07-09)

Biological clock found in fungal parasite sheds more light on 'zombie ants' phenomenon
A working biological clock has been found in a fungal parasite that infects ants to control their behavior and lead them away from their nests in an effort to spread their fungal spores more effectively. (2017-11-06)

Ants provide clues to why biodiversity is higher in the tropics
New global data of invertebrate distributions suggests time holds key to species diversity. (2018-05-30)

Diet or regular? Decoding behavioral variation in ant clones
Clonal ants appear to be diverse in responding to sweetened water, suggesting epigenetic regulation in behavioral variation and colony survival. (2018-02-13)

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