Popular Apple News and Current Events

Popular Apple News and Current Events, Apple News Articles.
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Parasitic plants conspire to keep hosts alive
The plant that encourages kissing at Christmas is in fact a parasite, and new research reveals mistletoe has an unusual feeding strategy. When two mistletoes invade the same tree, they increase photosynthesis to get the nutrients they need, essentially sharing the tree and causing it less harm. (2021-02-23)

Your smartphone now knows if you smoke and may help you quit
A study from Gero longevity company shows that smoking cessation leads to rejuvenation that can be monitored by a mobile phone app (2019-01-23)

How bees live with bacteria
More than 90 percent of all bee species are not organized in colonies, but fight their way through life alone. They are also threatened. Scientists from Würzburg demand more research on the ecology of these insects. (2019-08-27)

Diagonal methods for expensive global optimization developed by Russian scientists
Russian scientists from Lobachevsky State University of Nizhni Novgorod have improved the method of global optimization by offering the so-called 'diagonal approach.' The goal of global optimization is essentially to search for optimal solutions in various areas of human activity. The principal advantage of the diagonal approach compared to other methods is its speed. (2017-11-10)

Autism breakthrough
Using a visual test that is known to prompt different reactions in autistic and normal brains, Harvard researchers have shown that those differences were associated with a breakdown in the signaling pathway used by GABA, one of the brain's chief inhibitory neurotransmitters. (2015-12-17)

Fat distribution in women and men provides clues to heart attack risk
It's not the amount of fat in your body but where it's stored that may increase your risk for heart attack, stroke and diabetes, according to a new study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). The study looked at the differences in fat distribution patterns among overweight and obese men and women and their associated cardiometabolic risk. (2017-11-28)

Making snack food choices
People who are asked whether they would choose between a (2008-09-11)

Conserving historic apple trees
Many apple varieties common in the United States a century ago can no longer be found in today's orchards and nurseries. But some historic apple trees still survive in abandoned farmsteads and historic orchards throughout the US. Now, scientists interested in conserving these horticultural treasures have set out to identify and catalogue them, working to discover if the last remnants of historical trees may still be alive in American landscapes. (2009-11-04)

A genetic trigger adds branches to plants, could boost crop yields
When it comes to agriculture from branched plants, such as apple trees, the more branches that bear fruit, the better. But in the real world, there's a limit to the number of branches that plants make -- a gene tends to put the brakes on this splitting process called shoot branching. Today in ACS Central Science, researchers reveal a chemical that can reverse this limitation, possibly leading to improved crop production. (2018-02-07)

New research finds drinking 100% fruit juice does not affect blood sugar levels
New research demonstrates that 100% fruit juice has no impact on blood sugar levels. (2018-01-18)

Sound Off! The Navy, haring protection and mobile devices
The Office of Naval Research is sponsoring the development of a new app to help warfighters learn about hearing protection on their mobile Android devices -- and snap close-up selfies of themselves wearing earplugs to see if they're using them properly. (2017-01-31)

Foodborne pathogens hard to remove from produce, research is ongoing
Will you ever feel comfortable eating fresh spinach again? All raw agricultural products carry a minimal risk of contamination, said a University of Illinois scientist whose research focuses on keeping foodborne pathogens, including the strain of E. coli found recently on spinach, out of the food supply. (2006-10-02)

Mobile app for autism screening yields useful data
A Duke study of an iPhone app to screen young children for signs of autism has found the app easy to use, welcomed by caregivers and good at producing reliable scientific data. The app first administers caregiver consent forms and survey questions and then uses the phone's 'selfie' camera to collect videos of young children's reactions while they watch movies designed to elicit emotion and attention on the device's screen. (2018-06-01)

Damage encourages maple species to become female, Rutgers study finds
Jennifer Blake-Mahmud reports that striped maples not only change their sex periodically, but that they can wait until the last minute - three weeks before flowering - to do it. The switch appears to be triggered by physical damage, which can prompt a branch to flower female if it's cut off a male tree. (2018-02-22)

Apple pectin, apple juice extracts shown to have anticarcinogenic effects on colon
The apples and apple juice you consume may have positive effects in in the colon. New research has demonstrated that both apple pectin and polyphenol-rich apple juice components actually enhance biological mechanisms that produce anticarcinogenic compounds during the fermentation process. (2008-03-26)

Thinking outside the box: Adults with ADHD not constrained in creativity
People often believe those with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder face challenges that could hinder future employment, but a University of Michigan study found that adults with ADHD feel empowered doing creative tasks that could help them on the job. (2018-10-09)

Ants fight plant diseases
New research from Aarhus University shows that ants inhibit at least 14 different plant diseases. The small insects secrete antibiotics from glands in the body. On their legs and body, they also host colonies of bacteria that secrete antibiotics. It is probably these substances that inhibit a number of different diseases and researchers now hope to find biological pesticides that may conquer resistant plant diseases. (2019-10-17)

Our memory shifts into high gear when we think about raising our children, new study shows
Human memory has evolved so people better recall events encountered while they are thinking about raising their offspring, according to a new study conducted by researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2017-12-15)

What's the buzz on bee parasites?
Published today in the open-access journal GigaScience is an article that presents the genome sequence and analysis of the honey bee parasitic mite T. mercedesae. Bee colonies are facing wide-spread devastation across the entire world. The research revealed there were specific features in the mite genome that had been shaped by their interaction with honey bees and that special mechanisms to control these mites would be required. (2017-02-22)

Researchers use emojis to develop a modern face scale for product testing
A new study finds that emojis are a viable alternative to words when it comes to accurately measuring how kids feel about food, products and other experiences. With that discovery, researchers developed an emoji scale that may help companies better test products in non-Western cultures. (2018-05-08)

Disease-resistant apples perform better than old favorites
You may not find them in the produce aisle yet, but it's only a matter of time before new disease-resistant apple cultivars overtake favorites like Honeycrisp in popularity, according to a University of Illinois apple expert. (2017-11-14)

Smartphone 'scores' can help doctors track severity of Parkinson's disease symptoms
A new smartphone app allows Parkinson's disease patients and their doctors to better track the progression of symptoms, such as tremors and walking difficulties, that can vary dramatically over days, or even hours. (2018-04-06)

Blood vessels can make you fat, and yet fit
IBS scientists have reported Angiopoietin-2 (Angpt2) as a key driver that inhibits the accumulation of potbellies by enabling the proper transport of fatty acid into general circulation in blood vessels, thus preventing insulin resistance. Their findings have been published online in the journal Nature Communications (12 June 2020). (2020-06-24)

High patient satisfaction rates after 'Adam's apple' reduction surgery
Cosmetic surgery to reduce the masculine appearance of the 'Adam's apple' has a high patient satisfaction rate, according to a study in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery--Global Open®, the official open-access medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).  (2018-11-07)

VAT fat may cause pathogenic obesity
VAT, Visceral Adipose Tissue, a kind of fat that accumulates around the abdominal organs, has an important immune function. The body may choose to turn excess fat into FAT not SAT, subcutaneous fat when a fetus is not well nourished and is likely to face disease. (2019-01-11)

Trusting your instincts leads you to the right answer
A UCL (University College London) study has found that you are more likely to perform well if you do not think too hard and instead trust your instincts. The research, published online today in the journal Current Biology, shows that, in some cases, instinctive snap decisions are more reliable than decisions taken using higher-level cognitive processes. (2007-01-08)

Looking to choose a healthy post-workout snack? Decide early, study says
A post-exercise snack can threaten to undo the gains (or losses) of a workout. But the decision itself may depend on when you make it, according to a new study from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Participants asked to choose between an apple and brownie were about one-third more likely to favor the fruit when deciding before vs. after their workouts. (2019-01-31)

A simple measurement of abdominal obesity
In obesity research, the body mass index (BMI) has been traditionally used to determine if an individual is normal weight, underweight, overweight or obese. However, BMI does not differentiate between the types of the mass (fat or muscle) or body shapes. (2018-09-27)

Stanford, Apple describe heart study with over 400,000 participants
A clinical trial to determine whether a smartwatch app that analyzes pulse-rate data can screen for a heart-rhythm disorder has enrolled more than 400,000 participants. Researchers at Stanford Medicine, in collaboration with Apple, launched the Apple Heart Study last November to determine whether a mobile app that uses the optical sensor on the Apple Watch to analyze pulse rate data can identify atrial fibrillation. (2018-11-01)

Orchards in natural habitats draw bee diversity, improve apple production
Apple orchards surrounded by agricultural lands are visited by a less diverse collection of bee species than orchards surrounded by natural habitats, according to a new Cornell University-led study, published in the journal Science. (2019-01-17)

New study shows that infants have 'mind-reading' capability
One of the unique characteristics of humans that distinguish us from the animal kingdom is the ability to represent others' beliefs in our own minds. New research published in the July issue of Psychological Science suggests that this ability develops at very young age. (2007-08-03)

Physical activity data, emojis on Apple Watch correlated with patient-reported outcomes
Wearable activity monitors, such as the Apple Watch, provide objective, continuous activity data that correlate with established patient-reported outcomes for cancer patients, according to a poster presentation by Mayo Clinic researchers that was presented at the American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting in Atlanta. (2017-12-09)

Among body shapes, pears are healthier than apples
For women, fat usually accumulates around the hips, resulting in a pear-shaped look. In men, fat tends to build up around the abdomen, creating an apple shape. As it turns out, it's healthier to be a pear than an apple. A UC Riverside research team has found that only male mice experienced neuroinflammation after being fed a high-fat diet. While females were unaffected, males showed low testosterone and reduced sperm count, in addition to neuroinflammation. (2018-09-12)

Fish oil without the fishy smell or taste
A new study, co-led by University of Cincinnati researchers, describes the development of a refining process that scientists deem a superior method to help produce better dietary omega-3 health and dietary supplements containing fish oil. (2020-09-15)

Green meets nano
A doctoral student in materials science at Technische Universitat Darmstadt is making multifunctional nanotubes of gold -- with the help of vitamin C and other harmless substances. (2014-12-03)

Keep calm and don't carry on when parenting teens
In a new study, University of Rochester psychologists find that mothers and fathers who are less capable of dampening down their anger are more likely to resort to harsh discipline aimed at their teens, and that fathers in particular were not as good at considering alternative explanations for their teens' behavior. (2019-02-19)

Computer chip vulnerabilities discovered by WSU researchers
A Washington State University research team has uncovered significant and previously unknown vulnerabilities in high-performance computer chips that could lead to failures in modern electronics. (2018-12-13)

A nonet of new plant species from Africa emphasizes the importance of herbaria in botany
Some collected 40 years ago, some as far back as a 100, nine new plant species from the custard apple genus Monanthotaxis have been recently discovered on dusty shelves and described in PhytoKeys to showcase the importance of herbaria in botany. (2016-08-30)

Dark chocolate with olive oil associated with improved cardiovascular risk profile
Dark chocolate enriched with extra virgin olive oil is associated with an improved cardiovascular risk profile, according to research presented today at ESC Congress. (2017-08-29)

New data unearths pesticide peril in beehives
Honeybees -- employed to pollinate crops during the blooming season -- encounter danger due to lingering and wandering pesticides, according to a new Cornell University study that analyzed the bee's own food. (2017-04-20)

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