Popular Applications News and Current Events

Popular Applications News and Current Events, Applications News Articles.
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Spray coated tactile sensor on a 3D surface for robotic skin
A KAIST research team has reported a stretchable pressure insensitive strain sensor by using an all solution-based process. The solution-based process is easily scalable to accommodate for large areas and can be coated as a thin-film on 3-dimensional irregularly shaped objects via spray coating. (2018-09-20)

Faster genome evolution methods to transform yeast for industrial biotechnology
A research team led by Prof. DAI Junbiao at the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, in collaboration with Prof. Patrick Cai from the Manchester Institute of Biotechnology, developed a 'rapid, efficient and universal' way of transforming yeast at the molecular level using a method called SCRaMbLE (Synthetic Chromosome Rearrangement and Modification by LoxP-mediated Evolution). (2018-05-25)

VCU physicists discover a tri-anion particle with colossal stability
A team in the lab of Puru Jena, Ph.D., a distinguished professor in the Department of Physics in the College of Humanities and Sciences at Virginia Commonwealth University, has created the most stable tri-anion particle currently known to science. A tri-anion particle is a combination of atoms that contains three more electrons than protons. This discovery is novel because previously known tri-anion particles were unstable due to their numerical imbalance. (2017-09-18)

Climate game changer
New research from University of Alberta and University of Vienna microbiologists provides unparalleled insight into the Earth's nitrogen cycle, identifying and characterizing the ammonia-oxidizing microbe, Nitrospira inopinata. (2017-08-23)

Conservation endocrinology in a changing world
The BioScience Talks podcast (http://bioscience.libsyn.com) features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences. (2017-05-10)

3-D nanoscale imaging made possible
In a research article '3D Nano-scale Imaging by Plasmonic Brownian Microscopy' published today in Nanophotonics, the team around Prof. Xiang Zhang from the University of California in Berkeley demonstrate a method for meeting this challenge with stunning properties. (2017-12-15)

The dawn of gallium oxide microelectronics
Pushing semiconductor technology to its full potential requires smaller designs at higher energy density, and transparent conductive oxides are a key emerging material, offering the unlikely combination of conductivity and transparency over the visual spectrum. One conductive oxide has unique properties that allow it to function well in power switching: gallium oxide, a material with an incredibly large bandgap. In this week's Applied Physics Letters, researchers outline a case for producing microelectronics using gallium oxide. (2018-02-06)

Gold standards for nanoparticles
KAUST researchers reveal how small organic 'citrate' ions can stabilize gold nanoparticles, assisting research on the structures' potential. (2017-03-28)

Ancient paper art, kirigami, poised to improve smart clothing
In a study published April 2 in the journal Advanced Materials, a University at Buffalo-led research team describes how kirigami has inspired its efforts to build malleable electronic circuits. Their innovation -- creating tiny sheets of strong yet bendable electronic materials made of select polymers and nanowires -- could lead to improvements in smart clothing, electronic skin and other applications that require pliable circuitry. (2018-04-03)

Reviewing advanced applications in drug delivery and medicine
This review seeks to analyze current advances of potential applications of graphene and its family of nano-materials for drug delivery and other major biomedical purposes. (2019-01-11)

The heat is on: Asylum-seeking into the EU will increase with climate change
Weather shocks in countries around the world have increased applications by asylum seekers hoping to enter the European Union -- a trend that could dramatically increase in the future because of climate change, a new study suggests. (2017-12-21)

Electronic skin stretched to new limits
A metal carbide within a hydrogel composite senses, stretches and heals like human skin for use in medicine and robotics. (2018-06-15)

A simple additive to improve film quality
Simple chemicals called glycol ethers help make better perovskite thin films for solar cells. (2017-09-18)

Biorenewable, biodegradable plastic alternative synthesized by CSU chemists
Colorado State University polymer chemists have taken another step toward a future of high-performance, biorenewable, biodegradable plastics. Publishing in Nature Communications, the team led by Professor of Chemistry Eugene Chen describes chemical synthesis of a polymer called bacterial poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) ­- or P3HB. The compound shows early promise as a substitute for petroleum plastics in major industrial uses. (2018-06-22)

Having the right name helps one to find housing
Discrimination against ethnic minorities on the housing market is declining -- in Germany and other Western European countries and in the USA. But a new meta-study shows that applicants' surnames still influence the selection of new tenants. (2018-07-19)

New battery is activated by your spit
Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have developed the next step in microbial fuel cells (MFCs): a battery activated by spit that can be used in extreme conditions where normal batteries don't function. (2017-08-08)

Electronics of the future: A new energy-efficient mechanism using the Rashba effect
Scientists at Tokyo Tech proposed new quasi-1D materials for potential spintronic applications, an upcoming technology that exploits the spin of electrons. They performed simulations to demonstrate the spin properties of these materials and explained the mechanisms behind their behavior. (2018-12-27)

Carbon nanotubes made into conductive, flexible 'stained glass'
Carbon nanotubes are promising materials for many high-technology applications due to their exceptional mechanical, thermal, chemical, optical and electrical properties. Now researchers at Northwestern University have used metallic nanotubes to make thin films that are semitransparent, highly conductive, flexible and come in a variety of colors, with an appearance similar to stained glass. These results could lead to improved high-tech products such as flat-panel displays and solar cells. (2008-04-08)

Scientists develop a new material for manipulating molecules
A scientist at the University of Córdoba, working with an international research team, has created a new porous single-crystal material which could have numerous applications in nanotechnology and catalysis. (2018-01-17)

Ultra ultrasound to transform new tech
A new, more sensitive method to measure ultrasound may revolutionize everything from medical devices to unmanned vehicles. Researchers at The University of Queensland have combined modern nanofabrication and nanophotonics techniques to build the ultra precise ultrasound sensors on a silicon chip. (2019-01-15)

Finnish drivers use WhatsApp, PokémonGo and Tinder while driving
Researchers at the University of Jyväskylä tracked how Finnish drivers use their smartphones while driving. Drivers seem to use the same applications in traffic as elsewhere, without much moderation. Unexpectedly, heavy smartphone users even increased their phone use in dense traffic. It seems that some of the heavy users accept the risks resulting from the high levels of visual-manual distraction. The greatest smartphone-based risks in traffic seem to be caused by messaging applications. (2018-03-26)

An artificial skin that can help rehabilitation and enhance virtual reality
EPFL scientists have developed a soft artificial skin that provides haptic feedback and -- thanks to a sophisticated self-sensing mechanism -- has the potential to instantaneously adapt to a wearer's movements. Applications for the new technology range from medical rehabilitation to virtual reality. (2019-09-27)

Hiring antibodies as nanotechnology builders
Researchers at the University of Rome Tor Vergata recruit antibodies as molecular builders to assemble nanoscale structures made of synthetic DNA. (2019-12-03)

Novel capping strategy improves stability of perovskite nanocrystals
Perovskite materials have shown great promise for use in next-generation solar cells and LEDs, but their instability remains a critical limitation. Atoms on the surface are vulnerable to reactions that can degrade the material, so molecules that bind to the surface (capping ligands) are used both to stabilize perovskite nanocrystals and to control their properties. Researchers have used unique branched ligands to synthesize perovskite nanocrystals with greatly improved stability and uniform particle size. (2016-06-13)

Method stabilizes, enhances phosphorene
A Northwestern University research team used organic chemistry to covalently react a single-molecule-thick layer onto phosphorene to stabilize its reactivity to open air. (2016-05-02)

Potential gender bias against female researchers in peer review of research grants
Is peer review biased? Female health researchers who applied for grants from Canada's major health research funder were funded less often than male counterparts because of potential bias, and characteristics of peer reviewers can also affect the result, found a study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2018-04-23)

Safe potassium-ion batteries
Australian scientists have developed a nonflammable electrolyte for potassium and potassium-ion batteries, for applications in next-generation energy-storage systems beyond lithium technology. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists write that the novel electrolyte based on an organic phosphate makes the batteries safer and also allows for operation at reduced concentrations, which is a necessary condition for large-scale applications. (2020-01-31)

Password managers vulnerable to insider hacking
A new study shows that communication channels between different parts and pieces of computer software are prone to security breaches. Anyone with access to a shared computer -- co-workers, family members, or guests -- can attack or involuntarily subject it to security breaches. (2018-08-15)

New polymers for applications in nanopatterning and nanolithography
The Cidetec Technological Centre continues to invest in nanotechnology development with its participation in the European NAPA (Emerging Nanopatterning Methods) project. The research institution is directing a working subgroup to develop new thermoplastic polymers for applications in nanopatterning and nanolithography. (2005-04-19)

Researchers find simpler way to deposit magnetic iron oxide onto gold nanorods
Researchers have found a simpler way to deposit magnetic iron oxide (magnetite) nanoparticles onto silica-coated gold nanorods, creating multifunctional nanoparticles with useful magnetic and optical properties. (2017-12-11)

Determining the shapes of atomic clusters
In a new study published in EPJ B, researchers propose a new method of identifying the morphologies of atomic clusters. They have confirmed that the distinctive geometric shapes of some clusters, as well as the irregularity of amorphous structures, can be fully identified mathematically. (2019-10-25)

SUTD developed highly stretchable hydrogels for high resolution multimaterial 3D printing
Researchers from SUTD and HUJI have developed the most stretchable 3D printed hydrogel in the world -- it can be stretched up to 1300 percent. The hydrogel is also suitable for UV curing based 3D printing techniques, enabling it to be used for high resolution complex geometric printing. (2018-05-31)

Industrial biotechnology and bioprocessing meeting set for April 21-23
The first world congress on biotechnology and bioprocessing will be held April 21-23 in Orlando, Fla. Organized by the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society, the Biotechnology Industry Organization and the National Agriculture Biotechnology Council, the meeting will examine the connection between biotechnology, chemistry and agriculture. It also will focus on novel applications of industrial biotechnology. (2004-04-15)

One-dimensional crystals for low-temperature thermoelectric cooling
Nagoya University researchers studied the thermal and electrical properties of one-dimensional crystals composed of tantalum, silicon and tellurium for thermoelectric cooling at temperatures below 250 K (-23°C). The thermoelectric characteristics of these crystals were varied at temperatures ranging from the cryogenic level of 50 K up to room temperature by doping with molybdenum and antimony. The crystals' thermoelectric power factors greatly exceeded those of conventional materials around room temperature, indicating their suitability for low-temperature applications. (2017-05-24)

Junior investigators successfully compete for extra NIH grants
More than half of early-career scientists who received their first research project (R01) grants from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) are successful in obtaining subsequent funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), according to a study published September 12 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Patricia Haggerty and Matthew Fenton of NIAID, an NIH institute. (2018-09-13)

New complex carbohydrate discovered in barley
University of Adelaide researchers have discovered a new complex carbohydrate in barley. The first of its kind to be discovered in over 30 years, the cereal polysaccharide has potential applications in food, medicine and cosmetics. (2019-01-07)

UIC chemical engineers first to functionalize boron nitride with other nanosystems
Scientists report that treatment with a superacid causes boron nitride layers to separate into atomically thick sheets, while creating binding sites on the surface of these sheets that provide opportunities to interface with nanoparticles, molecules and other 2D nanomaterials, like graphene. (2018-09-25)

New research unveils graphene 'moth eyes' to power future smart technologies
New research published today in Science Advances has shown how graphene can be manipulated to create the most light-absorbent material for its weight, to date. (2016-02-26)

Delivering the Internet of the future -- at the speed of light and open sourced
New research has found, for the first time, a scientific solution that enables future Internet infrastructure to become completely open and programmable while carrying Internet traffic at the speed of light. (2016-01-26)

Multimodality imaging training for general and advanced cardiology fellowships
In the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications volume 4, issue 1, pp. 9-12(4) ; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.0010, Chittur A. Sivaram, MD, FACP, FASE, FACC from the Department of Medicine, University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, OK, USA considers multimodality imaging training for general and advanced cardiology fellowships. (2019-05-08)

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