Popular Applied Mathematics News and Current Events

Popular Applied Mathematics News and Current Events, Applied Mathematics News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Measuring AI's ability to learn is difficult
Organizations looking to benefit from the artificial intelligence (AI) revolution should be cautious about putting all their eggs in one basket, a study from the University of Waterloo has found. (2019-01-17)

Applied science may yield more translational research publications than basic science
While translational research can happen at any stage of the research process, a recent investigation of behavioral and social science research awards granted by the NIH between 2008 and 2014 revealed that applied science yielded a higher volume of translational research publications than basic science, according to a study published May 9, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Xueying Han from the Science and Technology Policy Institute, USA, and colleagues. (2018-05-09)

Breakthrough in circuit design makes electronics more resistant to damage and defects
A paper in today's Nature Electronics details an innovation from researchers at the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York that provides robust protection against circuitry damage that affects signal transmission. (2018-03-09)

Blue Brain team discovers a multi-dimensional universe in brain networks
Using a sophisticated type of mathematics in a way that it has never been used before in neuroscience, a team from the Blue Brain Project has uncovered a universe of multi-dimensional geometrical structures and spaces within the networks of the brain. This research, published in Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience, has significant implications for our understanding of the brain. (2017-06-12)

Scientist emphasizes importance of multi-level thinking
An unusual paper by Prof. Michael E. McIntyre from University of Cambridge touches on a range of deep questions, including insights into the nature of science itself, and of scientific understanding -- what it means to understand a scientific problem in depth -- and into the communication skills necessary to convey that understanding and to mediate collaboration across specialist disciplines. (2017-08-17)

Influence of technology acquisition on organizational performance studied in Iran
80 international companies from Iran were selected, and 320 respondents in key managerial positions were questioned. As the researchers found out, acquisition and use of technological innovations is a positive influence on organizational efficiency. (2018-05-08)

Diagonal methods for expensive global optimization developed by Russian scientists
Russian scientists from Lobachevsky State University of Nizhni Novgorod have improved the method of global optimization by offering the so-called 'diagonal approach.' The goal of global optimization is essentially to search for optimal solutions in various areas of human activity. The principal advantage of the diagonal approach compared to other methods is its speed. (2017-11-10)

Women are naturally more fit than men
Women can process oxygen more quickly than men when they start to exercise, according to a new study from the University of Waterloo. (2017-12-04)

Balancing time & space in the brain: New model holds promise for predicting brain dynamics
A team of scientists has extended the balanced network model to provide deep and testable predictions linking brain circuits to brain activity. (2016-10-31)

The 3-D selfie has arrived
Computer scientists at the University of Nottingham and Kingston University have solved a complex problem that has, until now, defeated experts in vision and graphics research. They have developed technology capable of producing 3-D facial reconstruction from a single 2-D image -- the 3-D selfie. People are queuing up to try it and so far, more than 400,000 users have had a go. (2017-09-26)

Mathematics pushes innovation in 4-D printing
New mathematical results will provide a potential breakthrough in the design and the fabrication of the next generation of morphable materials. (2018-02-07)

Designing a new material for improved ultrasound
Development of a theoretical basis for ultrahigh piezoelectricity in ferroelectric materials led to a new material with twice the piezo response of any existing commercial ferroelectric ceramics, according to an international team of researchers from Penn State, China and Australia. (2018-03-22)

US educators awarded for exemplary teaching in mathematics
Janet Heine Barnett, Caren Diefenderfer, and Tevian Dray were named the 2017 Deborah and Franklin Tepper Haimo Award winners by the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) for their teaching effectiveness and influence beyond their institutions. The three math professors were honored for their contributions to mathematics education on Jan. 5 in Atlanta at the Joint Mathematics Meetings, the world's largest gathering of mathematicians. (2017-01-05)

Novel method for investigating pore geometry in rocks
In a fusion of mathematics and earth science, researchers in Japan proposed a novel method for characterizing pore geometry in rock, based on persistence diagram analysis and a newly proposed parameter, the distance parameter H. The method represents heterogeneity and differences in rock type more effectively than the conventional method based on velocity distribution, without requiring costly numerical flow simulations, and the results are relatively stable with small changes in pore space. (2018-06-15)

Authors of year's best books in mathematics honored
Prizes for the year's best books in mathematics were awarded to Ian Stewart and Tim Chartier by the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) on Jan. 5 in Atlanta at the Joint Mathematics Meetings, the world's largest gathering of mathematicians. (2017-01-05)

Researchers find new way of exploring the afterglow from the Big Bang
Researchers have developed a new way to improve our knowledge of the Big Bang by measuring radiation from its afterglow, called the cosmic microwave background radiation. The new results predict the maximum bandwidth of the universe, which is the maximum speed at which any change can occur in the universe. (2018-04-19)

140-year-old math problem solved by researcher
A problem which has defeated mathematicians for almost 140 years has been solved by a researcher at Imperial College London. Professor Darren Crowdy, Chair in Applied Mathematics, has made the breakthrough in an area of mathematics known as conformal mapping, a key theoretical tool used by mathematicians, engineers and scientists to translate information from a complicated shape to a simpler circular shape so that it is easier to analyze. (2008-03-03)

More democracy through mathematics
For democratic elections to be fair, voting districts must have similar sizes. When populations shift, districts need to be redistributed -- a complex and, in many countries, controversial task when political parties attempt to influence redistricting. Mathematicians at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now developed a method that allows the efficient calculation of optimally sized voting districts. (2017-06-23)

Variations in seafloor create freak ocean waves
Florida State University researchers have found that abrupt variations in the seafloor can cause dangerous ocean waves known as rogue or freak waves -- waves so catastrophic that they were once thought to be the figments of seafarers' imaginations. (2019-02-01)

Countries with greater gender equality have lower percentage of female STEM graduates
Although women currently are well represented in life sciences, they continue to be underrepresented in inorganic sciences, such as computer science and physics. Now, researchers from the University of Missouri and Leeds Beckett University in the United Kingdom have found that as societies become wealthier and more gender equal, women are less likely to obtain degrees in STEM. The researchers call this a 'gender-equality paradox.' Researchers also discovered a near-universal sex difference in academic strengths and weaknesses that contributes to the STEM gap. (2018-02-15)

UQ study shines a light to understand the body's balance system
Finding out what's happening in the brains of people with balance disorders, such as vertigo, might be one step closer following new research on the vestibular system, which controls balance and movement. An interdisciplinary University of Queensland team of optical physicists and biologists has found a novel way, using optical tweezers, or focused beams of light, to understand the vestibular system while animals are still, not moving. (2017-10-05)

Numerical infinities and infinitesimals open new horizons in computations and give unexpected answers to 2 Hilbert problems
In the last issue of the prestigious journal EMS Surveys in Mathematical Sciences published by the European Mathematical Society there appeared a 102 pages long paper entitled 'Numerical infinities and infinitesimals: Methodology, applications, and repercussions on two Hilbert problems' written by Yaroslav D. Sergeyev, Professor at Lobachevsky State University in Nizhni Novgorod, Russia and Distinguished Professor at the University of Calabria, Italy. (2017-11-22)

Changing students' attitudes to mathematics improves test scores
A new study finds a free 'massive, open, online course' (MOOC) led to students feeling more positive about math, more engaged during math class, and scoring significantly higher in mathematics assessments. This is the first of its kind to focus on changing students' mindsets and beliefs about their mathematics potential. (2018-05-10)

Lasers make magnets behave like fluids
Researchers have discovered how magnets recover after being blasted by a laser. It turns out, they act a bit like oil and water in a jar. (2019-04-18)

Amazon rainforest may be more resilient to deforestation than previously thought
Taking a fresh look at evidence from satellite data, and using the latest theories from complexity science, researchers at the University of Bristol have provided new evidence to show that the Amazon rainforest is not as fragile as previously thought. The research is published today in Nature Communications. (2017-05-30)

Massive astrophysical objects governed by subatomic equation
Surprisingly, a quintessential equation of quantum mechanics emerges while studying astronomical disks of orbiting material. (2018-03-05)

The secret behind a choice cuppa or a perfect pint -- a mathematician
Professor William Lee shows how the science of math can aid the profits of industry. (2018-04-13)

MIT solves 100-year-old engineering problem
As a car accelerates down a hill then slows to follow a hairpin turn, the airflow around it cannot keep up and detaches from the vehicle. This aerodynamic separation creates drag that slows the car. The same phenomenon affects airplanes, boats, and submarines. Now, in work that could lead to controlling the effect with potential impacts on fuel efficiency and more, MIT scientists report new work for predicting where that aerodynamic separation will occur. (2008-09-25)

Math can predict how cancer cells evolve
Applied mathematics can be a powerful tool in helping predict the genesis and evolution of different types of cancers, a study from the University of Waterloo has found. (2018-01-16)

Math shows how human behavior spreads infectious diseases
Mathematics can help public health workers better understand and influence human behaviors that lead to the spread of infectious disease, according to a study from the University of Waterloo. (2018-08-16)

Scientists join international research team in discovery that could improve HD TV
Scientists at Queen's University Belfast have been working as part of an international team to develop a new process, which could lead to a new generation of high-definition (HD), paving the way for brighter, lighter and more energy efficient TVs and smart devices. (2018-01-31)

A model for autoignition in turbulent jets
Jets are rapid streams of liquids or gases that forcefully shoot into a surrounding medium. When ignitable substances are involved, combustion--rapid chemical reactions that result in heat and light--can occur. Autoignition ensues when this spontaneous combustion results in a visible flame. In a newly-published paper, authors provide a mathematical model for autoignition in free round turbulent jets. (2018-03-09)

People can see beauty in complex mathematics, study shows
Ordinary people see beauty in complex mathematical arguments in the same way they can appreciate a beautiful landscape painting or a piano sonata. (2019-09-05)

Lobachevsky University scientists in search of fast algorithms for discrete optimization
Lobachevsky University scientists are implementing a research project (2017-12-01)

Enrichment program boosts STEM for black students but leaves Latinos behind
In a new study that capitalizes on data from the National Center for Educational Statistics and methods that address causality, Cornell sociologists looked at an earlier portion of the pipeline -- in high school, when students' commitment to STEM fields tends to solidify. (2018-03-02)

'Mirror game' test could secure early detection of schizophrenia, study shows
A pioneering new study, led by experts from the University of Exeter in collaboration with partners from the Alterego FP7 EU project, has developed a new, 'mirror game' test using computer avatars to accurately detect specific variations in how patients move and interact socially -- well-documented characteristics of the mental disorder. (2017-02-01)

Massage could be used to aid recovery of damaged limbs
Massage could increase the regrowth of muscle after muscle loss, according to new research published in The Journal of Physiology. The researchers showed that muscle grew faster after a massage because protein manufacture in cells was improved, and that when one leg was massaged, the other non-massaged leg also grew faster. (2017-10-31)

Standards for Engineering Education in K-12, new report
Science, technology, engineering and mathematics instruction is collectively referred to as (2010-09-29)

Educational psychology: Finding the fun in maths
New work by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers on students' emotional attitudes to mathematics confirms that positive emotions and success at learning in math mutually reinforce each other. (2017-02-08)

1 in 5 children live in poverty -- A new report examines effect of poverty on children
While most children are looking forward to getting gifts during the upcoming holiday season, it is worth noting that one in five children live in poverty. Poverty is a major risk factor for children's development and deep poverty is linked to a range of problems. A new Social Policy Report from SRCD on Children, Families and Poverty provides an overview of the research evidence on the development of children who live in poverty. (2012-12-04)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.