Popular Archaeologist News and Current Events

Popular Archaeologist News and Current Events, Archaeologist News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 6 | 220 Results
Rock art: Life-sized sculptures of dromedaries found in Saudi Arabia
At a remarkable site in northwest Saudi Arabia, a CNRS archaeologist and colleagues from the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage have discovered camelid sculptures unlike any others in the region. They are thought to date back to the first centuries BC or AD. The find sheds new light on the evolution of rock art in the Arabian Peninsula. (2018-02-13)

ANU study casts new light on fishing throughout history
A new study from The Australian National University (ANU) has revealed new insights into ancient fishing throughout history, including what type of fish people were regularly eating as part of their diet. (2018-11-11)

Indonesian island found to be unusually rich in cave paintings
A tiny Indonesian island, previously unexplored by archaeologists, has been found to be unusually rich in ancient cave paintings following a study by researchers from The Australian National University (ANU). (2017-12-15)

Uncovering a 5000-year-old family tragedy
An international team, lead by researchers from the universities of Copenhagen and Aarhus, has shed light on a mysterious 5000-year-old mass grave in Poland. Despite being killed brutally, the victims were buried carefully. Ancient DNA has revealed the mass murder to be that of a large family. The new research results shed light on a particularly violent era in European prehistory of which little is known. The study has just been published in the American journal PNAS. (2019-05-10)

ANU archaeologist discovers Cornish barrow site
Untouched Bronze-Age burial mound discovered by chance by ANU Archaeologist, Dr. Catherine Frieman. She will begin a 14-day archaeological dig on Easter Saturday to examine the site. (2018-03-28)

Ancient Irish musical history found in modern India
An archaeologist studying musical horns from iron-age Ireland has found musical traditions, thought to be long dead, are alive and well in south India. The realization that modern Indian horns are almost identical to many iron-age European artifacts reveals a rich cultural link between the two regions 2,000 years ago. (2016-05-13)

Cornell research illuminates inaccuracies in radiocarbon dating
Radiocarbon dating is a key tool archaeologists use to determine the age of plants and objects made with organic material. But new research shows that commonly accepted radiocarbon dating standards can miss the mark -- calling into question historical timelines. (2018-06-05)

Scandinavia's earliest farmers exchanged terminology with Indo-Europeans
5,000 years ago, the Yamnaya culture migrated into Europe from the Caspian steppe. In addition to innovations such as the wagon and dairy production, they brought a new language -- Indo-European -- that replaced most local languages the following millennia. But local cultures also influenced the new language, particularly in southern Scandinavia, where Neolithic farmers made lasting contributions to Indo-European vocabulary before their own language went extinct, new research shows. (2017-09-29)

ANU archaeologist finds world's oldest funereal fish hooks
An archaeologist from The Australian National University has uncovered the world's oldest known fish-hooks placed in a burial ritual, found on Indonesia's Alor Island, northwest of East Timor. (2017-12-14)

Huge ancient language dictionary finished after 90 years
An ambitious project to identify, explain and provide citations for the words written in cuneiform on clay tablets and carved in stone by Babylonians, Assyrians and others in Mesopotamia between 2500 B.C. and A.D. 100 has been completed after 90 years of labor, the University of Chicago announced June 5. (2011-06-05)

Livestock bones help date the earliest spread of millet grains outside China
New research from Washington University in St. Louis and Kiel University in Germany uses DNA from the skeletal remains of sheep and goats to show that animals first domesticated in the Near East had reached eastern Kazakhstan by 2700 BC, and that these animals were fed millet grain first domesticated in China to help them survive harsh winters. (2019-09-04)

Archaeologists to establish true value of Roman silver coins
An archaeologist at the University of Liverpool is examining more than 1,000 Roman silver coins from museums around the world in order to establish their true economic value. (2006-03-03)

Cretan tomb's location may have strengthened territorial claim
Examining the position occupied by tombs in their landscape in Prepalatial Crete gives us new insights into the role played by burial sites, mortuary practices and the deceased in the living society. (2019-10-09)

Better labor practices could improve archaeological output
In a new paper, 'Essential Excavation Experts: Alienation and Agency in the History of Archaeological Labor,' published in Archaeologies: Journal of the World Archaeological Congress, archaeologist AllisonMickel illuminates the ways that nineteenth century archaeologists working in the Middle East managed local labor in ways that reflected capitalist labor management models. Her analysis also reveals how much archaeological knowledge production has fundamentally relied upon site workers' active choices in responding to labor conditions. (2019-04-22)

There's a place for us: New research reveals humanity's roles in ecosystems
In two back-to-back symposia at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Washington, D.C., on Sunday, Feb. 17 at 1:30 and 3:30 PM respectively, a cross-disciplinary cohort of scientists will present the first comprehensive investigations of how humans interacted with plant and animal species in different cultures worldwide through time. (2019-02-17)

Picasso's plans to build the world's tallest concrete sculpture uncovered in Florida
Pablo Picasso's plans to build a 100-foot sculpture for the University of South Florida in Tampa are uncovered along with a recorded interview with famed collaborator Carl Nesjar and architectural drawings by world famous architect Paul Rudolph. (2018-02-28)

Research reveals water management and climate change in ancient Maya city
The findings inside a cave and a key cultural and religious center for the ancient Maya will be presented at the annual meeting of the Association of American Geographers in New York. (2012-02-21)

Archaeological discovery upends a piece of Barbados history
Which came first, the pigs or the pioneers? In Barbados, that has been a historical mystery ever since the first English colonists arrived in 1627 to encounter what they thought was a herd of wild European pigs. A Simon Fraser University researcher is shedding new light on the mystery and the altering of New World environments. (2019-05-16)

Ancient human remains and a mystery unearthed by ANU archaeologist
ANU Archaeologist Dr Catherine Frieman unearths and intact 4,000 year old human cremation in clay pottery urn on Cornish site she discovered by accident. (2018-05-17)

Redefining knowledge of elderly people throughout history
An archaeologist from The Australian National University is set to redefine what we know about elderly people in cultures throughout history, and dispel the myth that most people didn't live much past 40 prior to modern medicine. (2018-01-03)

A shipwreck and an 800-year-old 'made in China' label reveal lost history
Nearly a thousand years ago, a ship sank in the Java Sea near Indonesia. Cargo recovered from the ocean floor -- including the equivalent to a 'Made in China' label on a piece of pottery -- is helping archaeologists reevaluate when the ship went down and how it fits in with China's history. (2018-05-16)

How modern were European Neanderthals?
Neandertals were much more like modern humans than had been previously thought, according to a re-examination of finds from one of the most famous palaeolithic sites in Europe by Bristol University archaeologist, Professor Joao Zilhao, and his French colleagues. (2006-08-24)

Wildlife Crime Symposium
Rutgers School of Criminal Justice will sponsor the Wildlife Crime Symposium, May 14, to mark the inauguration of its Center for Conservation Criminology. The symposium will focus on issues concerning poaching of elephants, parrots and leopards, illegal commercial fishing, and law enforcement. Dr. Richard Leakey, conservationist, paleontologist, archaeologist, and professor of anthropology at Stony Brook University, will deliver the keynote address in which he will share his research on wildlife crime and its global impact. (2013-05-09)

What happened in the past when the climate changed?
New research shows for the first time how the changing climate in Asia, from 5,000 to 1,000 years ago, transformed people's ability to produce food in particular places. The model enables the co-authors to get at the causes of some dramatic historic and cultural changes. (2018-10-31)

Archaeologists uncover new clues to Maya collapse
Using the largest set of radiocarbon dates ever obtained from a single Maya site, a team of archaeologists, led by the University of Arizona, developed a high-precision chronology that sheds new light on patterns leading up to the two major collapses of the Maya civilization. (2017-01-23)

Professor Rina Talgam awarded the polonsky prize for her comprehensive examination of a millennium of mosaics
Prof. Rina Talgam, the Alice and Edward J. Winant Family Professor of Art History, in the History of Art Department in the Hebrew University of Jerusalem's Faculty of Humanities, has been following the intricate visual dialogues among Paganism, Judaism, Samaritanism, Christianity and Islam in the Holy Land from before the Roman Empire to after the Muslim conquests. (2016-06-07)

Violence in pre-Columbian Panama exaggerated, new study shows
An oft-cited publication said a pre-Colombian archaeological site in Panama showed signs of extreme violence. A new review of the evidence strongly suggests that the interpretation was wrong. (2018-09-24)

400,000-year-old fossil human cranium is oldest ever found in Portugal
A large international research team, directed by the Portuguese archaeologist João Zilhão and including Binghamton University anthropologist Rolf Quam, has found the oldest fossil human cranium in Portugal, marking an important contribution to knowledge of human evolution during the middle Pleistocene in Europe and to the origin of the Neandertals. (2017-03-13)

Chemical analyses uncover secrets of an ancient amphora
A team of chemists from the University of Valencia has confirmed that the substance used to hermetically seal an amphora found among remains at Lixus, in Morocco, was pine resin. The scientists also studied the metallic fragments inside the 2,000-year-old vessel, which could be fragments of material used for iron-working. (2010-01-20)

Archaeologists find 12th Dead Sea Scrolls cave
Hebrew University archaeologists have found a cave that previously contained Dead Sea scrolls, which were looted in the middle of the 20th Century. Scholars suggest the cave should be numbered as Cave 12, along with the 11 caves previously known to have housed hidden Dead Sea scrolls. 'Finding this additional scroll cave means we can no longer be certain that the original locations assigned to the scrolls that reached the market via the Bedouins are accurate,' said Dr. Oren Gutfeld. (2017-02-08)

Research team quantifies blind spots on the protein maps
While researchers already know what the DNA-blueprints look like for most proteins, they do not know what many of these proteins actually do in the body. An interdisciplinary team composed of experimental and computational scientists from the University of Luxembourg has now systematically quantified and characterized the extent of this knowledge gap. An unprecedented effort has been directed towards predicting more specifically how many, among the proteins of unknown function, are enzymes. (2017-12-04)

U of T researchers shed light on ancient Assyrian tablets
A cache of cuneiform tablets unearthed by a team led by a University of Toronto archaeologist has been found to contain a largely intact Assyrian treaty from the early 7th century BCE. (2010-04-08)

Genetic marker tells squash domestication story
In the January 8 Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI), The Cucurbit Network and the University of Puerto Rico establish mitochondrial DNA analysis as a powerful tool for understanding relationships among flowering plants. A comparison of mtDNA from cultivated squash, pumpkins, gourds and their wild ancestors strongly supports hypotheses based on archeological and ethnobotanical evidence for six independent domestication events in the New World. (2002-01-07)

Unique sledge dogs helped the Inuit thrive in the North American Arctic
A unique group of dogs helped the Inuit conquer the tough terrain of the North American Arctic, major new analysis of the remains of hundreds of animals shows. (2019-11-26)

Texas A&M field school discoveries may rewrite history of early North American man
New discoveries in a valley on the eastern edge of the Texas Hill Country will prompt rewriting the history of early North American man, predict Texas A&M University archaeologists who are co-directing excavations at the artifact-rich site. (2001-01-30)

World's oldest axe fragment found in Australia
Australian archaeologists have discovered a piece of the world's oldest axe in the remote Kimberley region of Western Australia. (2016-05-10)

NC State takes lead in crime scene investigation training
North Carolina State University researchers are launching a new project that will standardize forensic crime scene investigation training throughout the state, decrease the cost of providing the training to law enforcement personnel and forensic scientists, and hopefully contribute to the establishment of nationwide standards for death investigations. (2008-10-09)

Rare find: human teeth used as jewellery in Turkey 8,500 years ago
At a prehistoric archaeological site in Turkey, researchers have discovered two 8,500-year-old human teeth, which had been used as pendants in a necklace or bracelet. Researchers have never documented this practice before in the prehistoric Near East, and the rarity of the find suggests that the human teeth were imbued with profound symbolic meaning for the people who wore them. (2019-12-13)

New discoveries point to 'cave of John the Baptist' as important site in the time of Isaiah
Recently completed excavations at Israel's Suba Cave, an archaeological site that is possibly connected with John the Baptist, has revealed new features that deepen the mystery of the site's ancient origins, and point to extensive use of the area's installations during the 7th Century BC - roughly the time of Isaiah. (2006-03-31)

Traditional fisherfolk help uncover ancient fish preservation methods
Archaeologists have little insight into the methods used for the long-term processing and preservation of fish in the past. A study of traditional fish preparation employed by fisherfolk in Panama and Egypt, revealed patterns of modifications to the fishes' skeletons which are comparable to those found among fish remains recovered in archaeological sites (2019-09-24)

Page 1 of 6 | 220 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.