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Popular Archaeologists News and Current Events, Archaeologists News Articles.
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Excavation in Northern Iraq: Sasanian loom discovered
A team of Frankfurt-based archaeologists has returned from the Iraqi-Kurdish province of Sulaymaniyah with new findings. (2017-11-06)
UTMN scientists confirm the high speed of Siberia development
Following the trail of Siberian pioneers, archaeologists from the University of Tyumen have investigated the camp on Karachinsky Island, the Lower Tobol River, where, according to chronicles, Yermak and his Cossacks spent a winter. (2018-06-27)
New research shows how Indo-European languages spread across Asia
A new study has discovered that horses were first domesticated by descendants of hunter-gatherer groups in Kazakhstan who left little direct trace in the ancestry of modern populations. (2018-05-09)
Radiocarbon dating reveals mass grave did date to the Viking age
A team of archaeologists, led by Cat Jarman from the University of Bristol's Department of Anthropology and Archaeology, has discovered that a mass grave uncovered in the 1980s dates to the Viking Age and may have been a burial site of the Viking Great Army war dead. (2018-02-02)
Indonesian island found to be unusually rich in cave paintings
A tiny Indonesian island, previously unexplored by archaeologists, has been found to be unusually rich in ancient cave paintings following a study by researchers from The Australian National University (ANU). (2017-12-15)
Ancient lake reveals a colorful past
Archaeologists say they may have discovered one of the earliest examples of a 'crayon' -- possibly used by our ancestors 10,000 years ago for applying color to their animal skins or for artwork. (2018-01-26)
URI, IAA archaeologists discover shipwrecks, ancient harbor on coast of Israel
A team of archaeologists have discovered the remains of a fleet of early-19th century ships and ancient harbor structures from the Hellenistic period at the city of Akko, one of the major ancient ports of the eastern Mediterranean. (2012-11-28)
Did ancient irrigation technology travel Silk Road?
Using satellite imaging and drone reconnaissance, archaeologists from Washington University in St. (2018-01-04)
The Lancet Infectious Diseases: Oldest ever schistosomiasis egg found may be first proof of early human technology exacerbating disease burden
The discovery of a schistosomiasis parasite egg in a 6200-year-old grave at a prehistoric town by the Euphrates river in Syria may be the first evidence that agricultural irrigation systems in the Middle East contributed to disease burden, according to new Correspondence published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases. (2014-06-19)
Ancient human population histories revealed in Central and South America
The first high quality ancient DNA data from Central and South America -- 49 individuals some as old as 11,000 years -- has revealed a major and previously unknown exchanges between populations. (2018-11-09)
Archaeologists uncover 13,000-year-old bones of ancient, extinct species of bison
In what is considered one of the oldest and most important archaeological digs in North America, scientists have uncovered what they believe are the bones of a 13,000- to 14,000-year-old ancient, extinct species of bison. (2016-05-11)
Archaeology: Pots, people and knowledge transfer
In the Late Neolithic, a new style of pottery appears among the grave goods buried with the dead in many parts of Europe. (2018-02-22)
How aerial thermal imagery is revolutionizing archaeology
A Dartmouth-led study has demonstrated how the latest aerial thermal imagery is transforming archaeology due to advancements in technology. (2017-09-24)
Archaeologists trace early irrigation farming in ancient Yemen
In Yemen, new evidence of ancient transitions from hunting and herding to irrigation agriculture have been found. (2008-07-16)
Agriculture initiated by indigenous peoples, not Fertile Crescent migration
Small scale agricultural farming was first initiated by indigenous communities living on Turkey's Anatolian plateau, and not introduced by migrant farmers as previously thought, according to new research by the University of Liverpool. (2018-03-19)
The Caucasus: Complex interplay of genes and cultures
In the Bronze Age, the Caucasus Mountains region was a cultural and genetic contact zone. (2019-02-04)
The secret to a stable society? A steady supply of beer doesn't hurt
Scientists analyzed bits of beer vessels from an ancient Peruvian brewery to learn what the beer was made of and where the materials to make the vessels came from. (2019-04-18)
Amazon farmers discovered the secret of domesticating wild rice 4,000 years ago
Amazonian farmers discovered how to manipulate wild rice so the plants could provide more food 4,000 years ago, long before Europeans colonized America, archaeologists have discovered. (2017-10-09)
Laser technology takes Maya archeologists where they've never gone before
With the help of airborne laser mapping technology, a team of archeologists, led by UA professor Takeshi Inomata, is exploring on a larger scale than ever before the history and spread of settlement at the ancient Maya site of Ceibal in Guatemala. (2018-02-21)
Cheops' pyramid: Is there an iron throne in the newly discovered chamber?
A recent exploration has shown the presence of a significant void in the pyramid of Khufu at Giza. (2018-01-11)
Beyond Mesopotamia: A radical new view of human civilization reported in Science
A radically expanded view of the origin of civilization, extending far beyond Mesopotamia, is reported by journalist Andrew Lawler in the Aug. (2007-08-02)
Parts of the Amazon thought uninhabited were actually home to up to a million people
Parts of the Amazon previously thought to have been almost uninhabited were really home to thriving populations of up to a million people, new research shows. (2018-03-27)
Skilled female potters travelled around the Baltic nearly 5000 years ago
During the Corded Ware Culture period, Finland, Estonia and Sweden received skilful female artisans, who had learned to create fashionable and innovative pottery in the eastern region of the Gulf of Finland. (2018-03-22)
Morbidity and mortality of leprosy in the Middle Ages
In the Middle Ages, did contracting leprosy necessarily increase a person's chances of dying? (2017-10-03)
Compassion helped Neanderthals to survive, new study reveals
They have an unwarranted image as brutish and uncaring, but new research has revealed just how knowledgeable and effective Neanderthal healthcare was. (2018-03-13)
Copper Age Iberians 'exported' their culture -- but not their genes -- all over Europe
Prehistoric Iberians 'exported' their culture throughout Europe, reaching Great Britain, Sicily, Poland and all over central Europe in general. (2018-02-21)
Discovery of ancient tools in China suggests humans left Africa earlier than previously thought
Ancient tools and bones discovered in China by archaeologists suggest early humans left Africa and arrived in Asia earlier than previously thought. (2018-07-11)
Earliest evidence for a native African cultigen discovered in Eastern Sudan
Archaeologists examining plant impressions within broken pottery have discovered the earliest evidence for domesticated sorghum in Africa. (2017-09-27)
Scandinavians shaped by several waves of immigration
So you think people in present-day Sweden and Norway are different from each other? (2018-02-01)
Historians to climate researchers: Let's talk
Ours is not the first society to be confronted by massive environmental change. (2018-03-19)
How fruit flies ended up in our fruit bowls
Fruit flies can be a scourge in our homes, but to date no-one has known how they became our uninvited lodgers. (2018-12-07)
Research sheds new light on early turquoise mining in Southwest
Researchers are blending archaeology and geochemistry to get a more complete picture of turquoise's mining and distribution in the pre-Hispanic Southwest. (2017-10-18)
Ancient rice may hold key to solving the puzzle of the settlement of Madagascar
Archaeologists studying the distribution of ancient rice believe they may be close to solving one of the enduring mysteries of the ancient world -- how people of South East Asian origin ended up living on the African island of Madagascar, 6,000 km away. (2016-06-01)
Ancient fortress reveals how prehistoric civilizations of Central Asia lived
Scientists from Russia and Uzbekistan found a unified fortification system that on the northern border of ancient Bactria. (2019-02-01)
Sensational grave find in Cypriote Bronze Age city
An archaeological expedition from the University of Gothenburg has discovered one of the richest graves from the Late Bronze Age ever found on the island of Cyprus. (2016-08-10)
Remains of Anglo-Saxon cemetery discovered
Archaeologists from the University of Sheffield have uncovered a previously unknown Anglo-Saxon cemetery. (2018-11-27)
Micro to macro mapping -- Observing past landscapes via remote-sensing
New multi-scale relief modelling algorithm helps archaeologists rediscover topographical features of the past. (2018-02-08)
Swedish and Greek archaeologists discover unknown city in Greece
An international research team at the Department of Historical Studies, University of Gothenburg, is exploring the remains of an ancient city in central Greece. (2016-12-13)
Swedes have been brewing beer since the Iron Age, new evidence confirms
Archaeologists at Lund University in Sweden have found carbonised germinated grains showing that malt was produced for beer brewing as early as the Iron Age in the Nordic region. (2018-06-20)
First intensive investigation of early agriculture in Liangchengzhen suggests rice was prevalent
Archaeologists from the University of Toronto, the Field Museum, and Shandong University announce the results of the first intensive investigation of early agriculture in Liangchengzhen, Shandong in Northern China. (2005-04-06)
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