Popular Archaeology News and Current Events

Popular Archaeology News and Current Events, Archaeology News Articles.
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Excavation in Northern Iraq: Sasanian loom discovered
A team of Frankfurt-based archaeologists has returned from the Iraqi-Kurdish province of Sulaymaniyah with new findings. The discovery of a loom from the 5th to 6th century AD in particular caused a stir. (2017-11-06)

Old Maori village discovered by Otago archaeologists
A group of University of Otago archaeologists have uncovered the peripheries of a 14th century Maori village in Gisborne, New Zealand. (2018-05-30)

UCF researchers develop first sypersymmetric laser array
A team of University of Central Florida researchers has overcome a long-standing problem in laser science, and the findings could have applications in surgery, drilling and 3D laser mapping. (2019-02-28)

Interdisciplinary approach yields new insights into human evolution
The evolution of human biology should be considered part and parcel with the evolution of humanity itself, proposes Nicole Creanza, assistant professor of biological sciences. She is the guest editor of a new themed issue of the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B that takes an interdisciplinary approach to human evolution. (2018-02-13)

Archaeologists discover bread that predates agriculture by 4,000 years
At an archaeological site in northeastern Jordan, researchers have discovered the charred remains of a flatbread baked by hunter-gatherers 14,400 years ago. It is the oldest direct evidence of bread found to date, predating the advent of agriculture by at least 4,000 years. The findings suggest that bread production based on wild cereals may have encouraged hunter-gatherers to cultivate cereals, and thus contributed to the agricultural revolution in the Neolithic period. (2018-07-16)

Ancient lake reveals a colorful past
Archaeologists say they may have discovered one of the earliest examples of a 'crayon' -- possibly used by our ancestors 10,000 years ago for applying color to their animal skins or for artwork. (2018-01-26)

Radiocarbon dating reveals mass grave did date to the Viking age
A team of archaeologists, led by Cat Jarman from the University of Bristol's Department of Anthropology and Archaeology, has discovered that a mass grave uncovered in the 1980s dates to the Viking Age and may have been a burial site of the Viking Great Army war dead. (2018-02-02)

Scientists analyze first ancient human DNA from Southeast Asia
Harvard Medical School researchers lead the first whole-genome analysis of ancient human DNA from Southeast Asia Study identifies at least three major waves of human migration into the region over the last 50,000 years, each shaping the genetics of Southeast Asia (2018-05-17)

ANU study casts new light on fishing throughout history
A new study from The Australian National University (ANU) has revealed new insights into ancient fishing throughout history, including what type of fish people were regularly eating as part of their diet. (2018-11-11)

Prehistoric bling? Aesthetics crucial factor in development of earliest copper alloys
New study suggests golden hue crucial to development of world's earliest tin bronze artefacts. Using experimentally made copper alloys and colorimetric analyses, original colour of artefacts c. 6,500 years old can now be seen. (2017-12-21)

Britain's last Neanderthals were more sophisticated than we thought
An archaeological excavation at a site near Pulborough, West Sussex, has thrown remarkable new light on the life of northern Europe's last Neanderthals. It provides a snapshot of a thriving, developing population -- rather than communities on the verge of extinction. (2008-06-23)

Uncovering a 5000-year-old family tragedy
An international team, lead by researchers from the universities of Copenhagen and Aarhus, has shed light on a mysterious 5000-year-old mass grave in Poland. Despite being killed brutally, the victims were buried carefully. Ancient DNA has revealed the mass murder to be that of a large family. The new research results shed light on a particularly violent era in European prehistory of which little is known. The study has just been published in the American journal PNAS. (2019-05-10)

Domestic goat dating back to the Neolithic Corded Ware period identified in Finland
Goat hairs have been found in a grave structure that was discovered in the 1930s in Kauhava, western Finland. These are the oldest animal hairs found in Finland. From the perspective of Finnish prehistory, the finding supports the evidence of animal husbandry practised during the Corded Ware period, while also revealing details of burial rituals. (2018-02-23)

Stanford University study: 12 Tel Aviv University researchers among top 50 in the world
A new study from Stanford University identified 12 Tel Aviv University (TAU) researchers among the world's top 50 researchers in their fields. 333 TAU faculty members were also ranked among the top 2% of researchers in their respective disciplines based on publications, citations, and impact. 155 of them are included in the top 1%, and 74 in the top 0.5%. (2020-12-21)

Compared to nomadic communities, Silk Road cities were urban food deserts
Like passionate foodies who know the best places to eat in every town, Silk Road nomads may have been the gastronomic elites of the Medieval Ages, enjoying diets much more diverse than their sedentary urban counterparts, suggests a new study in the Nature journal Scientific Reports. (2018-03-27)

Sea-level rise predicted to threaten >13,000 archaeological sites in southeastern US
Sea-level rise may impact vast numbers of archaeological and historic sites, cemeteries, and landscapes on the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the southeastern United States, according to a study published Nov. 29, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by David Anderson from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, USA, and colleagues. (2017-11-29)

Researchers find first evidence of sub-Saharan Africa glassmaking
Scholars from Rice University, University College London and the Field Museum have found the first direct evidence that glass was produced in sub-Saharan Africa centuries before the arrival of Europeans, a finding that the researchers said represents a 'new chapter in the history of glass technology.' (2018-01-18)

ANU research reveals genetic timeline of early Pacific settlers
Researchers from The Australian National University have helped put together the most comprehensive study ever conducted into the origins of people in Vanuatu -- regarded as a geographic gateway from Asia to the Remote Pacific. (2018-03-09)

Compassion helped Neanderthals to survive, new study reveals
They have an unwarranted image as brutish and uncaring, but new research has revealed just how knowledgeable and effective Neanderthal healthcare was. (2018-03-13)

Hebrew U. archaeological excavations uncover Roman temple in Zippori (Sepphoris)
Ruins of a Roman temple from the second century CE have recently been unearthed in the Zippori National Park in Israel. Above the temple are foundations of a church from the Byzantine period. The excavations, which were undertaken by the Noam Shudofsky Zippori Expedition led by of Prof. Zeev Weiss of the Institute of Archaeology at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, shed light on the multicultural society of ancient Zippori. (2008-08-11)

An officer and a gentlewoman from the Viking army in Birka
War was not an activity exclusive to males in the Viking world. A new study conducted by researchers at Stockholm and Uppsala universities shows that women could be found in the higher ranks at the battlefield. (2017-09-08)

Research reveals connections between social science and high fashion
The presentation will be featured this month at the world's largest gathering of anthropologists. (2015-11-17)

Remains of ancient synagogue with unique mosaic floor found in Galilee
Remains of an ancient synagogue from the Roman-Byzantine era have been revealed in excavations carried out in the Arbel National Park in the Galilee under the auspices of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. A unique feature of the synagogue is the design of its mosaic floor. (2007-11-21)

ANU archaeologist discovers Cornish barrow site
Untouched Bronze-Age burial mound discovered by chance by ANU Archaeologist, Dr. Catherine Frieman. She will begin a 14-day archaeological dig on Easter Saturday to examine the site. (2018-03-28)

Remains of Anglo-Saxon cemetery discovered
Archaeologists from the University of Sheffield have uncovered a previously unknown Anglo-Saxon cemetery. (2018-11-27)

Research reveals 1 of the earliest farming sites in Europe
University of Cincinnati research is revealing early farming in a former wetlands region that was largely cut off from Western researchers until recently. The NSF-funded research will be presented at the Society for American Archaeology annual meeting in Memphis, Tenn. (2012-04-16)

Ancient Irish musical history found in modern India
An archaeologist studying musical horns from iron-age Ireland has found musical traditions, thought to be long dead, are alive and well in south India. The realization that modern Indian horns are almost identical to many iron-age European artifacts reveals a rich cultural link between the two regions 2,000 years ago. (2016-05-13)

Ancient rice may hold key to solving the puzzle of the settlement of Madagascar
Archaeologists studying the distribution of ancient rice believe they may be close to solving one of the enduring mysteries of the ancient world -- how people of South East Asian origin ended up living on the African island of Madagascar, 6,000 km away. (2016-06-01)

Ancient genomes reveal that the English are one-third Anglo-Saxon
For the first time, researchers at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute have been able to directly estimate the Anglo-Saxon ancestry of the British population, using ancient skeletons. Human remains excavated from burial sites near Cambridge provided the material for the first whole-genome sequences of ancient British DNA. The study estimated that approximately a third of British ancestors were Anglo-Saxon immigrants, showing how Anglo-Saxon immigrants mixed with the native population. (2016-01-19)

Cornell research illuminates inaccuracies in radiocarbon dating
Radiocarbon dating is a key tool archaeologists use to determine the age of plants and objects made with organic material. But new research shows that commonly accepted radiocarbon dating standards can miss the mark -- calling into question historical timelines. (2018-06-05)

Research on the meaning of ancient geometric earthworks in southwestern Amazonia
Researchers examine pre-colonial geometric earthworks in the southwestern Amazonia from the point of view of indigenous peoples and archaeology. The study shows that the earthworks were once important ritual communication spaces. (2017-08-30)

Scandinavia's earliest farmers exchanged terminology with Indo-Europeans
5,000 years ago, the Yamnaya culture migrated into Europe from the Caspian steppe. In addition to innovations such as the wagon and dairy production, they brought a new language -- Indo-European -- that replaced most local languages the following millennia. But local cultures also influenced the new language, particularly in southern Scandinavia, where Neolithic farmers made lasting contributions to Indo-European vocabulary before their own language went extinct, new research shows. (2017-09-29)

Identifying the use of tinder fungi among neolithic communities at la Draga
Inhabitants of the Neolithic community at la Draga already used fungi to light or transport fires 7,300 years ago. The discovery represents one of the oldest examples of technological use of fungi documented until now and is the result of several archaeological interventions at the site, which have also yielded an exceptional collection of these organisms, unique in all of prehistoric Europe. (2018-04-26)

Humans were changing the planet earlier than we knew
Humans had caused significant landcover change on Earth up to 4000 years earlier than previously thought, University of Queensland researchers have found. The School of Social Sciences' Dr Andrea Kay said some scientists defined the Anthropocene as starting in the 20th century, but the new research showed human-induced landcover change was globally extensive by 2000BC. (2019-08-30)

Study upends timeline for Iroquoian history
New research from Cornell University raises questions about the timing and nature of early interactions between indigenous people and Europeans in North America. (2018-12-07)

Not just for Christmas: Study sheds new light on ancient human-turkey relationship
For the first time, research has uncovered the origins of the earliest domestic turkeys in ancient Mexico. The study also suggests turkeys weren't only prized for their meat -- with demand for the birds soaring with the Mayans and Aztecs because of their cultural significance in rituals and sacrifices. (2018-01-17)

Study suggests environmental factors had a role in the evolution of human tolerance
Environmental pressures may have led humans to become more tolerant and friendly towards each other as the need to share food and raw materials became mutually beneficial, a new study suggests. (2021-02-03)

Research sheds new light on early turquoise mining in Southwest
Researchers are blending archaeology and geochemistry to get a more complete picture of turquoise's mining and distribution in the pre-Hispanic Southwest. (2017-10-18)

New study questions when the brown bear became extinct in Britain
New research provides insights into the extinction of Britain's largest native carnivore. The study -- 'The Presence of the brown bear in Holocene Britain: a review of the evidence' published in Mammal Review -- is the first of its kind to collate and evaluate the evidence for the brown bear in post-Ice Age Britain. (2018-07-04)

Stone Age child reveals that modern humans emerged more than 300,000 years ago
How old is our species? The complete genomes of three Stone Age individuals from the KwaZulu-Natal coast, helped to shed light on the age of our species. Their DNA shows that genetically modern humans emerged much earlier than previously thought, and probably in more than one African region. (2017-09-28)

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