Popular Architecture News and Current Events

Popular Architecture News and Current Events, Architecture News Articles.
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A memory without a brain
Having a memory of past events enables us to take smarter decisions about the future. Researchers at the Max-Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization (MPI-DS) and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now identified how the slime mold Physarum polycephalum saves memories - although it has no nervous system. (2021-02-23)

UChicago scientists craft world's tiniest interlinking chains
For decades, scientists have been trying to make a true molecular chain: a repeated set of tiny rings interlocked together. In a study in Science published online Nov. 30, University of Chicago researchers announced the first confirmed method to craft such a molecular chain. (2017-12-06)

Growing and moving
How interactions between neuronal migration and outgrowth shape network architecture. (2019-10-09)

Star architecture and its impact on the city
The Guggenheim Museum by star architect Frank Gehry led to an economic boom in the Spanish city of Bilbao. This 'Bilbao Effect' is appealing to many urban planners and politicians who look to better position their cities in economic and social terms by building exceptional architectural projects. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have studied three projects to investigate whether or not the desired effects materialize. (2018-02-12)

New 3D imaging and visualization technique provides detailed views of muscle architecture
In a new study, scientists in pathology and anatomical sciences in the University of Missouri's School of Medicine have revealed a three-dimensional view of the skeletal muscles responsible for flight in a European starling. The study will form the basis of future research on the bird's wishbone, which is supported by these particular muscles and is hypothesized to bend during flight. (2019-04-30)

Nanostructure boosts stability of organic thin-film transistors
A nanostructured gate dielectric may have addressed the most significant obstacle to expanding the use of organic semiconductors for thin-film transistors. The structure, composed of a fluoropolymer layer followed by a nanolaminate made from two metal oxide materials, serves as gate dielectric and protects the organic semiconductor - which had previously been vulnerable to damage from the ambient environment. (2018-01-12)

Genome: It's all about architecture
How do pathogens such as bacteria or parasites manage to hide from their host's immune system? Biochemist Nicolai Siegel is looking into this question within the scope of a new research project funded by the European Union with EUR 1.5 million. (2016-10-05)

Physics can predict wealth inequality
The 2016 election year highlighted the growing problem of wealth inequality and finding ways to help the people who are falling behind. This human urge of compassion isn't new, but the big question that remains to be addressed is why inequality is so difficult to erase. This inspired Adrian Bejan at Duke University, who in 1996 discovered the Constructal Law, to provide an answer. (2017-03-28)

Neuron and synapse-mimetic spintronics devices developed
A research group from Tohoku University has developed spintronics devices which are promising for future energy-efficient and adoptive computing systems, as they behave like neurons and synapses in the human brain. (2019-04-17)

Dew helps ground cloud computing
The most obvious disadvantage of putting your data in the cloud is losing access when you have no internet connection. According to research publishes in the International Journal of Cloud Computing, this is where 'dew' could help. (2015-09-15)

Blue lighting is scientifically proven to help us relax faster than white lighting after an argument
Researchers from the University of Granada say that blue light accelerates the relaxation process after acute psychosocial stress such as arguing with a friend or when someone pressures you to quickly finish some task. (2017-11-10)

NJIT professor's research suggests changes in underwater data communications
An NJIT professor, who has discovered new communication channels in underwater environments and invented a technique to communicate data through these channels, will be honored later this month by the New Jersey Inventors Hall of Fame. (2008-10-14)

Houseplants could one day monitor home health
In a perspective published in the July 20 issue of Science, a team of University of Tennessee faculty and a student from two unrelated disciplines -- plant sciences and architectural design -- explore the future of houseplants as aesthetically pleasing and functional sirens of home health. Their idea is to genetically engineer house plants to serve as subtle alarms that something is amiss in our home and office environments. (2018-07-20)

Quantum scientists demonstrate world-first 3D atomic-scale quantum chip architecture
UNSW scientists have shown that their pioneering single atom technology can be adapted to building 3D silicon quantum chips -- with precise interlayer alignment and highly accurate measurement of spin states. The 3D architecture is considered a major step in the development of a blueprint to build a large-scale quantum computer. (2019-01-07)

New method to map miniature brain circuits
In a feat of nanoengineering, scientists have developed a new technique to map electrical circuits in the brain far more comprehensively than ever before. Scientists worldwide could use the technique to uncover the architecture of different parts of the brain. (2018-01-12)

New tool increases adaptability, autonomy of 'Skyrim' nonplayer characters
Computer science researchers at North Carolina State University and Universidade de Lisboa have developed a tool for use with the game Skyrim that can be used to create nonplayer characters that allow for more variability and flexibility in game play. The tool, called CIF-CK, is an artificial intelligence architecture program that uses social behavior models to make individual NPCs more reactive and adaptable to player behavior. (2017-08-02)

Study reveals broad 'genetic architectures' of traits and diseases
Scientists at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have developed a powerful method for characterizing the broad patterns of genetic contributions to traits and diseases. (2018-08-13)

Making waves for ultrahigh definition displays
Wavy transistors that vertically gain width without increasing their on-chip footprint could drive future flexible displays. (2018-01-16)

USTC reports diamond ring architecture of a protein complex
Professor CAI Gang from USTC and Professor Jacques Côté's team reports the 4.7 Å structure of the yeast NuA4/TIP60 complex, which elucidates the detailed architecture and molecular interactions between NuA4 subunits. A related study is published online in Nature Communications on March 19. (2018-03-20)

Bio architecture lab technology converts seaweed to renewable fuels and chemicals
A team of scientists from Bio Architecture Lab, has developed breakthrough technology that expands the feedstocks for advanced biofuels and renewable chemicals production to include seaweed. The team engineered a microbe to extract the all the major sugars in seaweed and convert them into renewable fuels and chemicals, thus making seaweed a cost-effective, renewable source of biomass. BAL's scientific breakthrough is detailed in an article which appears on the cover of the Jan. 20 issue of Science magazine. (2012-01-19)

The complex journey of red bloods cells through microvascular networks
While the behavior of blood cells flowing within single, straight vessels is a well-known problem, less is known about the individual cellular-scale events giving rise to blood behavior in microvascular networks. To better understand this, researchers Peter Balogh and Prosenjit Bagchi published a recent study in the Biophysical Journal. (2018-03-15)

Microscope measures muscle weakness
Biotechnologists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have developed a system to accurately measure muscle weakness caused by structural changes in muscle tissue. The new method allows muscle function to be assessed using imaging without the need for sophisticated biomechanical recordings, and could in future even make taking tissue samples for diagnosing myopathy superfluous. The results have been published in the renowned journal Light: Science & Applications. (2018-11-28)

Researcher creates 3D printed multimaterial with programmed stiffness
The technology could be useful in various applications, including aircraft wing structures, protective coatings, energy absorption, actuation, flexible armor, artificial muscles, and microrobotics. (2018-06-08)

Illuminating the brain architecture of neuropsychiatric risk: The latest from PsychENCODE
Neuropsychiatric disorders have highly complex causes that involve hundreds of genes -- a feature that hindered development of related treatments. (2018-12-13)

Protein structure could unlock new treatments for cystic fibrosis
Biochemists at the University of Zurich have used cryo-electron microscopy to determine the detailed architecture of the chloride channel TMEM16A. This protein is a promising target for the development of effective drugs to treat cystic fibrosis. (2017-12-13)

Graphene can hear your brain whisper
A newly developed graphene-based implant can record electrical activity in the brain at extremely low frequencies and over large areas, unlocking the wealth of information found below 0.1 Hz. This technology, which will be showcased in the Graphene Pavilion at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona (25-28 February 2019) was developed by Graphene Flagship partners at the Barcelona Microelectronics Institute (IMB-CNM, CSIC), the Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (ICN2), and ICFO. (2019-01-24)

New computational tools to aid in protein research
Computer Science Professor Bruce Randall Donald and his students are working to ease this burden by developing techniques that simultaneously minimize the number of experiments and accelerate the NMR data analysis involved in determining the structure of proteins. (2004-06-23)

KAIST unveils the hidden control architecture of brain networks
A KAIST research team identified the intrinsic control architecture of brain networks. The control properties will contribute to providing a fundamental basis for the exogenous control of brain networks and, therefore, has broad implications in cognitive and clinical neuroscience. (2019-04-23)

New metal-semiconductor interface for brain-inspired computing
One of the big challenges in computer architecture is integrating storage, memory and processing in one unit. This would make computers faster and more energy efficient. University of Groningen physicists have taken a big step towards this goal by combining a niobium doped strontium titanate (SrTiO3) semiconductor with ferromagnetic cobalt. At the interface, this creates a spin-memristor with storage abilities, paving the way for neuromorphic computing architectures. The results were published in Scientific Reports. (2018-01-22)

Study demonstrates how Zika virus rewires and repurposes invaded cells
New research reveals a high-resolution view of the Zika viral life cycle within infected cells and shows dramatic changes in the cell's architecture throughout the infection process. This novel perspective may lead to the development of new vaccines and treatments. (2017-03-30)

Study highlights environmental cost of tearing down Vancouver's single-family homes
Rising property values in Vancouver have resulted in the demolition of an unprecedented number of single-family homes in recent years, many of which were replaced with the same type of structure. Despite the better energy performance of the new homes, this cycle is likely to increase overall greenhouse gas emissions, according to new analysis from researchers at the University of British Columbia and MountainMath Software. (2018-05-23)

Self-assembling 3D battery would charge in seconds
A cross-campus collaboration led by Ulrich Wiesner, professor of engineering in the at Cornell University, addresses this demand with a novel energy storage device architecture that has the potential for lightning-quick charges. The group's idea: Instead of having the batteries' anode and cathode on either side of a nonconducting separator, intertwine the components in a self-assembling, 3D gyroidal structure, with thousands of nanoscale pores filled with the elements necessary for energy storage and delivery. (2018-05-17)

New 3D-printed cement paste gets stronger when it cracks -- just like structures in nature
Purdue University researchers have 3D-printed cement paste, a key ingredient of the concrete and mortar used to build various elements of infrastructure, that gets tougher under pressure like the shells of arthropods such as lobsters and beetles. The technique could eventually contribute to more resilient structures during natural disasters. (2018-10-03)

A new brain-inspired architecture could improve how computers handle data and advance ai
IBM researchers are developing a new computer architecture, better equipped to handle increased data loads from artificial intelligence. Their designs draw on concepts from the human brain and significantly outperform conventional computers in comparative studies. They report on their recent findings in the Journal of Applied Physics. (2018-10-03)

Research reveals water management and climate change in ancient Maya city
The findings inside a cave and a key cultural and religious center for the ancient Maya will be presented at the annual meeting of the Association of American Geographers in New York. (2012-02-21)

Mystery of golden ratio explained
The golden ratio is a geometric proportion that has been theorized to be the most aesthetically pleasing to the eye and has been the root of countless mysteries over the centuries. Now, a Duke University engineer has found it to be a compelling springboard to unify vision, thought and movement under a single law of nature's design. (2009-12-21)

New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality
Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer. (2016-10-18)

Robot would assemble modular telescope -- in space
A new concept in space telescope design uses a modular structure and an assembly robot to build an extremely large telescope in space, performing tasks in which astronaut fatigue would be a problem. The design is detailed in a paper published this week by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics, in the Journal of Astronomical Telescopes, Instruments, and Systems by authors from Caltech and the Jet Propulsion Lab. (2016-07-12)

Criteria for the reduction of environmental impact applied in the Roman Theatre of Itálica
The authors of the study have developed tools that link Life-Cycle Analysis (LCA) and Building Information Modeling (BIM) software so that environmental-impact reduction criteria can be integrated into projects from the moment of their first design. (2019-03-11)

Leaves are nature's most sophisticated environment sensors
The experiment was spread over four continents, from the semiarid grasslands and savannas of Australia to lush pastures in Europe and prairies in America. (2019-02-05)

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