Popular Artificial Skin News and Current Events

Popular Artificial Skin News and Current Events, Artificial Skin News Articles.
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Artificial intelligence advances threaten privacy of health data
Advances in artificial intelligence, including activity trackers, smartphones and smartwatches, threaten the privacy of people's health data, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley. (2019-01-03)

A new generation of artificial retinas based on 2D materials
Scientists report they have successfully developed and tested the world's first ultrathin artificial retina that could vastly improve on existing implantable visualization technology for the blind. The flexible 2-D material-based device could someday restore sight to the millions of people with retinal diseases. The researchers will present their results today at the 256th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. (2018-08-20)

Artificial intelligence can dramatically cut time needed to process abnormal chest X-rays
New research has found that a novel Artificial Intelligence (AI) system can dramatically reduce the time needed to ensure that abnormal chest X-rays with critical findings will receive an expert radiologist opinion sooner, cutting the average delay from 11 days to less than three days. Chest X-rays are routinely performed to diagnose and monitor a wide range of conditions affecting the lungs, heart, bones, and soft tissues. (2019-01-22)

Major NIH grant will support early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease via skin testing
An expert team from Case Western Reserve University has received a five-year, $3.6 million grant from the National Institutes of Health for diagnosing Parkinson's disease (PD) via an innovative skin testing approach. (2019-10-04)

Better, cheaper bio-ink may be used to create artificial organs
A new bio-ink that may support a more efficient and inexpensive fabrication of human tissues and organs has been created by researchers at UBC's Okanagan campus. The UBC team analyzed the physical and biological properties of three different GelMA hydrogels -- porcine skin, cold-water fish skin and cold-soluble gelatin. (2017-09-13)

Spray coated tactile sensor on a 3D surface for robotic skin
A KAIST research team has reported a stretchable pressure insensitive strain sensor by using an all solution-based process. The solution-based process is easily scalable to accommodate for large areas and can be coated as a thin-film on 3-dimensional irregularly shaped objects via spray coating. (2018-09-20)

3D bioprinting technique could create artificial blood vessels, organ tissue
University of Colorado Boulder engineers have developed a 3D printing technique that allows for localized control of an object's firmness, opening up new biomedical avenues that could one day include artificial arteries and organ tissue. (2018-10-22)

US Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement on behavioral counseling to prevent skin cancer
The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends behavioral counseling to help reduce the risk of skin cancer from ultraviolet (UV) radiation in persons ages 6 months to 24 years with fair skin types. (2018-03-20)

Why people experience seasonal skin changes
A new British Journal of Dermatology study provides information that may help explain why many people experience eczema and dry skin in the winter. (2018-03-07)

New conductive coating may unlock biometric and wearable technology of the future
A team of researchers from the College of Engineering at Texas A&M University have developed a mechanically robust conductive coating that can maintain performance under heavy stretching and bending. (2018-03-09)

Neurons can learn temporal patterns
Individual neurons can learn not only single responses to a particular signal, but also a series of reactions at precisely timed intervals. This is what emerges from a study at Lund University in Sweden. (2017-05-29)

Nature-based solutions can prevent $50 billion in Gulf Coast flood damages
While coastal development and climate change are increasing the risk of flooding for communities along the US Gulf Coast, restoration of marshes and oyster reefs are among the most cost-effective solutions for reducing those risks, according to a new study. (2018-04-11)

AI helps to fight against lung cancer
Lung cancer has been the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in 2015 in United States. Early detection of lung nodules will undoubtedly increase the five-year survival rate for lung cancer according to prior studies. In a paper published in SCIENCE CHINA Information Sciences, researchers propose a novel rating method based on geometrical and statistical features to extract initial nodule candidates and an artificial neural network approach to the detection of lung nodules. (2017-06-29)

NIH scientists find microbes on the skin of mice promote tissue healing, immunity
Beneficial bacteria on the skin of lab mice work with the animals' immune systems to defend against disease-causing microbes and accelerate wound healing, according to new research from scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health. Researchers say untangling similar mechanisms in humans may improve approaches to managing skin wounds and treating other damaged tissues. The study was published online today in Cell. (2018-01-18)

Recreating the chameleon: material mimics color changes of living organisms
Researchers at Nagoya University created a material containing photochromic dyes, crystals providing structural coloration, and a colored background that mimics the color changes that animals such as frogs, chameleons, and octopuses can display. This material could display different patterns and images depending on whether it was exposed to visible or ultraviolet light, or had a white or black background, which suggests its potential application in a range of next-generation display technologies. (2018-06-27)

Training artificial intelligence with artificial X-rays
AI holds real potential for improving both the speed and accuracy of medical diagnostics -- but before clinicians can harness the power of AI to identify conditions in images such as X-rays, they have to 'teach' the algorithms what to look for. Now, U of T Engineering have designed a new approach: using machine learning to create computer generated X-rays to augment AI training sets. (2018-07-06)

Software lets designers exploit the extremely high resolution of 3-D printers
Software lets designers exploit the extremely high resolution of 3-D printers. (2017-08-04)

How wasp and bee stinger designs help deliver the pain
Next time you're stung by a wasp or a honeybee, consider the elegantly designed stinger that caused you so much pain. In a new study, researchers found that the stingers of the two species are about five times softer at the tip than at the base to make it easier to pierce skin. The stingers are harder closer to the insect's body so they don't bend too much, or break, as you yelp in agony. (2018-10-08)

Tracking wastewater's path to wells, groundwater
We often 'flush it and forget it' when it comes to waste from toilets and sinks. However, it's important to be able to track this wastewater to ensure it doesn't end up in unwanted places. Tracing where this water ends up is hard to measure: What's something found in all wastewater that will allow us to account for all of it? The answer, of all things, is artificial sweeteners. (2018-01-24)

Smart technology to help diagnose sepsis in children in Canada
Smart technology and artificial intelligence could be used to improve detection of sepsis in children in Canada, write authors of a commentary in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2018-09-10)

A simple method developed for 3-D bio-fabrication based on bacterial cellulose
Bacterial cellulose can be used in food, cosmetics and biomedical applications, such as implants and artificial organs. (2018-03-26)

Learning makes animals intelligent
The fact that animals can use tools, have self-control and certain expectations of life can be explained with the help of a new learning model for animal behavior. Researchers at Stockholm University and Brooklyn College have combined knowledge from the fields of artificial intelligence, ethology and the psychology of learning to solve several problems concerning the behavior and intelligence of animals. (2016-11-29)

Skin-ditching gecko inexplicably leaves body armor behind when threatened
When trouble looms, the fish-scale geckos of Madagascar resort to what might seem like an extreme form of self-defense -- tearing out of their own skin. Now, new research shows the geckos' skin contains a hidden strength: bony deposits known as osteoderms, the same material that makes up the tough scales and plates of crocodilians and armadillos. But the presence of osteoderms in fish-scale geckos raises a herpetological mystery: If they have armor, why do they discard it? (2017-08-03)

Experimental drug reverses hair loss and skin damage linked to fatty diet, shows new study in mice
In a series of experiments with mice, Johns Hopkins investigators have used an experimental compound to successfully reverse hair loss, hair whitening and skin inflammation linked by previous studies to human diets heavy in fat and cholesterol. (2018-07-30)

Skin game
Medical University of Vienna professor Leopold Eckhart and colleagues have performed one of the largest comparative genomic studies to help determine the key molecular and evolutionary origins of mammalian adaptations seen in skin proteins. ''The results of the present study provide important new data on the evolution of keratins that control the mechanical stability of the epidermis, the outermost layer of the skin,'' said Eckhart. (2018-12-13)

New blood test for the detection of bovine TB
A new blood test to detect Mycobacteria in blood has been developed by a team at The University of Nottingham. The researchers have used this new method to show that cattle diagnosed with bovine tuberculosis (bTB) have detectable levels of the bacterium Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) in their blood which causes this disease. The research paper is available on request. (2016-05-31)

NUS researchers unravel new insights into how brain beats distractions to retain memories
Researchers from the National University of Singapore have recently discovered a mechanism that could explain how the brain retains working memory when faced with distractions. These findings could endow cognitive flexibility to neural networks used for artificial intelligence. (2017-10-31)

Molting bowhead whales likely rub on rocks to facilitate sloughing off skin
Bowhead whales molt and rub on large rocks -- likely facilitating exfoliation -- in coastal waters in the eastern Canadian Arctic during late summer, according to a study published Nov. 22, 2017, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Sarah Fortune from University of British Columbia, Canada, and colleagues. (2017-11-22)

Researchers develop a new method for turning skin cells into pluripotent stem cells
Researchers at the University of Helsinki, Finland, and Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, have for the first time succeeded in converting human skin cells into pluripotent stem cells by activating the cell's own genes. (2018-07-06)

A chameleon-inspired material that stiffens and changes color
Researchers have developed a new material that mimics the dynamic properties of skin as it tenses -- and that changes colors in the process. (2018-03-29)

Artificial fingertip that 'feels' wins international robotics competition
An open-source 3-D-printed fingertip that can 'feel' in a similar way to the human sense of touch has won an international Soft Robotics competition for its contribution to soft robotics research. (2017-01-18)

Designing DNA from scratch: Engineering the functions of micrometer-sized DNA droplets
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have constructed ''DNA droplets'' comprising designed DNA nanostructures. The droplets exhibit dynamic functions such as fusion, fission, Janus-shape formation, and protein capture. Their technique is expected to be applicable to a wide variety of biomaterials, opening doors to many promising applications in materials design, drug delivery, and even artificial cell-like molecular systems. (2020-07-15)

New statistics reveal the shape of plastic surgery
The American Society of Plastic Surgeons released new data which shows continued growth in cosmetic procedures over the last year. (2018-03-01)

Novel film that that evaporates sweat six times faster and holds 15 times more moisture
Researchers from NUS Faculty of Engineering created a novel film that is very effective in evaporating sweat from our skin. Promising applications include shoe insoles and linings, as well as underarm pads for sweat absorption. (2021-01-04)

Muscle vibrations improve control over prosthetic hands
An automated brain-computer interface that vibrates the muscles used for control of prosthetic hands helped three amputees gain better movement control over the prosthetic, according to a new study by Paul Marasco and colleagues. (2018-03-14)

Artificial leaf goes more efficient for hydrogen generation
A new study, affiliated with Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology has introduced a new artificial leaf that generates hydrogen, using the power of the Sun to mimic underwater photosynthesis. (2017-01-04)

Study finds that people are attracted to outward signs of health, not actual health
Findings published in the journal Behavioral Ecology reveal that skin with yellow and red pigments is perceived as more attractive in Caucasian males, but this skin coloring does not necessarily signal actual good health. (2017-02-13)

Skin cancers linked with reduced risk of Alzheimer's disease
Previous studies have demonstrated a decreased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in individuals with various cancers, including non-melanoma skin cancers (including squamous cell cancers and basal cell cancers). (2018-04-19)

Popular blood pressure medicine linked with increased risk of skin cancer
Recently published research from the University of Southern Denmark and the Danish Cancer Society shows a connection between one of the most common medications for hypertension and skin cancer. (2017-12-04)

How to color a lizard: From biology to mathematics
Skin color patterns in animals arise from microscopic interactions among colored cells that obey equations discovered by Alan Turing. Researchers at UNIGE and SIB report that a lizard acquires its adult skin color by changing the color of individual skin scales using an esoteric computational system invented by John von Neumann. The researchers shows that the 3-D geometry of the lizard's skin scales causes the Turing mechanism to transform into the von Neumann computing system. (2017-04-12)

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