Popular Asteroids News and Current Events

Popular Asteroids News and Current Events, Asteroids News Articles.
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University of Hawaii team records self-destructing asteroid
University of Hawaii at Manoa Institute for Astronomy researchers discovered that asteroid Gault has begun to slowly disintegrate. The crumbling was first detected earlier this year. (2019-03-28)

APL astronomer spies conditions 'just right' for building an Earth
An Earth-like planet is likely forming 424 light-years away in a star system called HD 113766, say astronomers using NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. (2007-10-03)

Why are there different 'flavors' of iron around the Solar System?
New work from Carnegie's Stephen Elardo and Anat Shahar shows that interactions between iron and nickel under the extreme pressures and temperatures similar to a planetary interior can help scientists understand the period in our Solar System's youth when planets were forming and their cores were created. (2017-02-20)

Zwicky Transient Facility spots a bumper crop of supernovae, black holes and more
The Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF), an automated sky survey project based at Caltech's Palomar Observatory near San Diego, California, has produced its first bounty of new results. Since officially beginning operations in March 2018, the new instrument has discovered 50 small near-Earth asteroids and more than 1,100 supernovae, while observing more than 1 billion stars in the Milky Way galaxy. (2019-02-08)

New study shows what interstellar visitor 'Oumuamua can teach us
The first interstellar object ever seen in our solar system, named 'Oumuamua, is giving scientists a fresh perspective on how planets, asteroids and comets form. (2018-03-27)

Discovery of the first body in the Solar System with an extrasolar origin
Asteroid 2015 BZ509 is the very first object in the Solar System shown to have an extrasolar origin. This remarkable discovery was made by CNRS researcher Fathi Namouni and her Brazilian colleague Helena Morais, and is published on May 21, 2018 in MNRAS. (2018-05-22)

Russian physicists make toy asteroids and blast them with a laser
Researchers created small copies of asteroids in the laboratory, and then destroyed them with lasers. The nanosecond laser pulse served as an experimental substitute for a nuclear explosion. The experiments showed high efficiency of nuclear anti-asteroid defense. The study suggests the most effective asteroid destruction criteria, such as the explosion energy needed to eliminate a dangerous object on a collision course with Earth. (2018-03-13)

Small collisions make big impact on Mercury's thin atmosphere
Mercury, our smallest planetary neighbor, has very little to call an atmosphere, but it does have a strange weather pattern: morning micro-meteor showers. (2017-09-29)

Exiled asteroid discovered in outer reaches of solar system
An international team of astronomers has used ESO telescopes to investigate a relic of the primordial solar system. The team found that the unusual Kuiper Belt Object 2004 EW95 is a carbon-rich asteroid, the first of its kind to be confirmed in the cold outer reaches of the Solar System. This curious object likely formed in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter and has been flung billions of kilometers from its origin to its current home in the Kuiper Belt. (2018-05-09)

Earth and moon pummeled by more asteroids since the age of dinosaurs, say scientists
The number of asteroids colliding with the Earth and moon has increased by up to three times over the past 290 million years, according to a major new study involving the University of Southampton. These findings, published in Science challenge our previous understanding of Earth's history. (2019-01-17)

Astronomers find potential solution into how planets form
The quest to discover how planets found in the far reaches of the universe are born has taken a new, crucial twist. (2017-10-13)

What scientists found after sifting through dust in the solar system
Two recent studies report discoveries of dust rings in the inner solar system: a dust ring at Mercury's orbit, and a group of never-before-detected asteroids co-orbiting with Venus, supplying the dust in Venus' orbit. (2019-03-12)

Giant planets around young star raise questions about how planets form
Researchers have identified a young star with four Jupiter and Saturn-sized planets in orbit around it, the first time that so many massive planets have been detected in such a young system. The system has also set a new record for the most extreme range of orbits yet observed: the outermost planet is more than a thousand times further from the star than the innermost one, which raises interesting questions about how such a system might have formed. (2018-10-15)

SwRI's Martian moons model indicates formation following large impact
Southwest Research Institute scientists posit a violent birth of the tiny Martian moons Phobos and Deimos, but on a much smaller scale than the giant impact thought to have resulted in the Earth-moon system. Their work shows that an impact between proto-Mars and a dwarf-planet-sized object likely produced the two moons, as detailed in a paper published today in Science Advances. (2018-04-18)

UA-led OSIRIS-REx discovers water on asteroid, confirms Bennu as excellent mission target
Spectral observations made by the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft identified hydrated minerals across the asteroid, confirming that Bennu, a remnant from early in the formation of the solar system, is an excellent specimen for the OSIRIS-REx mission to study the composition of primitive volatiles and organics. (2018-12-10)

First interstellar immigrant discovered in the solar system
A new study has discovered the first known permanent immigrant to our solar system. The asteroid, currently nestling in Jupiter's orbit, is the first known asteroid to have been captured from another star system. The work is published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: Letters. (2018-05-21)

Comet Wild 2: A window into the birth of the solar system?
A team of scientists from University of Hawai'i and University of California investigated the oxygen isotope and mineral composition of the comet dust returned from Wild 2. In a study published recently, the team discovered an unexpected combination of material that has deepened the mystery of Wild 2's past. (2015-05-13)

Remote sensing for cosmic dust and other celestial bodies
In a paper recently published in EPJ Plus, Stefano Bagnulo from Armagh Observatory and Planetarium, UK, and colleagues review the state-of-the-art in polarimetry studies of the small bodies in our solar system. Combined with different observational techniques, polarimetry may be used as a remote sensing technique to measure asteroids' size, to reveal the composition and size variation of dust in comets or of aerosols in planetary atmospheres, or even to detect extra-terrestrial biomarkers. (2017-10-11)

Queen's University scientist warns of asteroid danger
A leading astrophysicist from Queen's University Belfast has warned that an asteroid strike is just a matter of time. (2017-06-20)

Rice lab mimics Jupiter's Trojan asteroids inside a single atom
Rice University physicists have built an accurate model of part of the solar system inside a single atom. In a new paper in Physical Review Letters, Rice's team and collaborators from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Vienna University of Technology showed they could make an electron orbit the atomic nucleus in the same way that Jupiter's Trojan asteroids orbit the sun. The findings uphold a 1920 prediction by physicist Niels Bohr. (2012-01-24)

Sky survey lowers estimate of asteroid impact risk
The odds of earth suffering a catastrophic collision with an asteroid over the next century are about one in 5,000, which is less likely than previously believed, according to research published this month. Astronomers using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey found that the solar system contains about 700,000 asteroids big enough to destroy civilization. That figure is about one-third the size of earlier estimates. (2001-11-07)

New laser technique may help detect chemical warfare in atmosphere
The Department of Homeland Security could benefit from a reliable, real-time instrument that could scan the atmosphere for toxic agents in order to alert communities to a biological or chemical attack. UCF optics and photonics Professor Konstantin Vodopyanov is developing just such a technology to accomplish that. (2018-03-26)

How to destroy an asteroid
Tel Aviv University studies the makeup of asteroids to save earth from sci-fi disaster. (2008-12-03)

3-D mini brains accelerate research for repairing brain function
Houston Methodist is making mini brains from human stem cells, putting researchers on a fast track to repair the nervous system after injury or disease of the brain and spinal cord. Researchers have developed a new system to reduce the time it takes to grow these brain models, which will give them the ability to screen drugs and study what's behind disease-causing mutations more quickly. The findings appear Dec. 12 in Stem Cell Reports. (2017-12-06)

AGU Fall Meeting: New simulations suggest meteors explode from the inside
Researchers have identified an explosive new mechanism that breaks down meteors as they hurtle toward Earth. New simulations of falling meteors suggest air particles penetrate the space rocks' porous interiors as they careen through the atmosphere. These air particles create pockets of high pressure that ultimately lead the rock to explode from the inside, tens of kilometers above the Earth. (2017-12-11)

Studying the solar system with NASA's Webb Telescope
NASA's James Webb Space Telescope will look across vast distances to find the earliest stars and galaxies and study the atmospheres of mysterious worlds orbiting other stars. But the observatory also will investigate objects in Earth's own neighborhood -- planets, moons, comets and asteroids in our solar system. (2016-02-08)

Geophysicist studies life in the early solar system
Between the cataclysmic impact that created the Moon around 4.5 billion years ago and the first evidence of life 3.8 billion years ago, there may have been long periods during which life repeatedly spread across the globe, only to be nearly annihilated by the impact of large asteroids. The early Earth, in other words, may have been an interrupted Eden. (2001-12-14)

Scientists theorize new origin story for Earth's water
Earth's water may have originated from both asteroidal material and gas left over from the formation of the Sun, according to new research. The new finding could give scientists important insights about the development of other planets and their potential to support life. (2018-11-07)

NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission explains Bennu's mysterious particle events
Shortly after NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft arrived at asteroid Bennu, an unexpected discovery by the mission's science team revealed that the asteroid could be active, or consistently discharging particles into space. (2019-12-05)

Asteroid 'time capsules' may help explain how life started on Earth
In popular culture, asteroids play the role of apocalyptic threat, get blamed for wiping out the dinosaurs -- and offer an extraterrestrial source for mineral mining. But for Georgia Tech researcher Nicholas Hud, asteroids play an entirely different role: that of time capsules showing what molecules originally existed in our solar system. Having that information gives scientists the starting point they need to reconstruct the complex pathway that got life started on Earth. (2018-02-17)

ASU geoscientists discover an overlooked source for Earth's water
When planet Earth formed, it grabbed a lot of hydrogen, a precursor to water, from the gas surrounding the newborn Sun. This source has long been neglected for geochemical reasons now shown to be incorrect. (2018-11-07)

Time between world-changing volcanic super-eruptions less than previously thought
After analyzing a database of geological records dated within the last 100,000 years, a team of scientists from the University of Bristol has discovered the average time between so-called volcanic super-eruptions is actually much less than previously thought. (2017-11-29)

A new approach for detecting planets in the Alpha Centauri system
Yale astronomers have taken a fresh look at the nearby Alpha Centauri star system and found new ways to narrow the search for habitable planets there. According to a study led by Professor Debra Fischer and graduate student Lily Zhao, there may be small, Earth-like planets in Alpha Centauri that have been overlooked. Meanwhile, the study ruled out the existence of a number of larger planets in the system. (2017-12-18)

When not seeing is believing
A year ago, astronomers identified the first interstellar visitor to our solar system. 'Oumuamua was studied by nearly every telescope available, including the ultra-sensitive Spitzer infrared space telescope. Despite a whopping 33 hours of observation time, 'Oumuamua proved too faint for Spitzer to see. Nevertheless, this allowed the observation team to draw significant conclusions. Their analysis of the visitor was published online on 14 November by The Astronomical Journal. (2018-11-16)

Iron volcanoes may have erupted on metal asteroids
Metallic asteroids are thought to have started out as blobs of molten iron floating in space. As if that's not strange enough, scientists now think that as the metal cooled and solidified, volcanoes spewing liquid iron could have erupted through a solid iron crust onto the surface of the asteroid. (2019-04-08)

SwRI to lead NASA's Lucy mission to Jupiter's Trojans
NASA has selected Southwest Research Institute to lead Lucy, a landmark Discovery mission to perform the first reconnaissance of the Trojans, a population of primitive asteroids orbiting in tandem with Jupiter. (2017-01-04)

'Oumuamua likely came from a binary star system
New research finds that 'Oumuamua, the rocky object identified as the first confirmed interstellar asteroid, very likely came from a binary star system. (2018-03-19)

Organic makeup of ancient meteorites sheds light on early Solar System
The origin of organic matter found in meteorites that formed during the birth of the Solar System 4.5 billion years ago may provide key clues to understanding the birth of life here on Earth. It could also help astronomers investigate the potential habitability of other solar systems. That's according to a new study led by The University of Manchester. (2018-08-06)

Particles collected by Hayabusa give absolute age of asteroid Itokawa
Japanese scientists, including those from Osaka University, closely examined particles collected from the asteroid Itokawa by the spacecraft Hayabusa, finding that the parent body of Itokawa was formed about 4.6 billion years ago when the solar system was born and that it was destroyed by a collision with another asteroid about 1.5 billion years ago. (2018-08-27)

ESO contributes to protecting Earth from dangerous asteroids
The unique capabilities of the SPHERE instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope have enabled it to obtain the sharpest images of a double asteroid as it flew by Earth on May 25. While this double asteroid was not itself a threatening object, scientists used the opportunity to rehearse the response to a hazardous Near-Earth Object (NEO), proving that ESO's front-line technology could be critical in planetary defense. (2019-06-03)

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