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Popular Athletes News and Current Events, Athletes News Articles.
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Creating 3D printed 'motion sculptures' from 2D videos
The new system uses an algorithm that can take D videos and turn them into 3D printed 'motion sculptures' that show how a human body moves through space. (2018-09-19)
Study uncovers key to preventing back pain in runners
Low back pain is a common complaint among both elite and recreational runners, but the true cause of it remains a mystery. (2018-01-03)
Food for thought: Ketogenic diets reduce athletes' anaerobic performance
The Saint Louis University research team found that after following a ketogenic diet, study participants did not perform as well at anaerobic exercise tasks. (2018-05-01)
Carbs during workouts help immune system recovery
Eating carbohydrates during intense exercise helps to minimise exercise-induced immune disturbances and can aid the body's recovery, QUT research has found. (2017-02-15)
Ditch plan to disregard all athletic world records before 2005, urge experts
The proposal by the European Athletics Council to disregard all athletic world records set before 2005 should be abandoned, insist experts in an editorial published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. (2017-12-07)
Is endurance training bad for you?
In 2012, Belgium scientists published a study that concluded that repeated bouts of intensive endurance exercise at the elite level may result in the pathological enlargement of the right ventricle, which, according to the article, is associated with potential health hazards including sudden cardiac death. (2016-05-31)
Estrogen may reduce disordered eating in female athletes with irregular periods
Giving one year of estrogen replacement to female athletes with exercise-induced menstrual irregularities improves drive for thinness, body dissatisfaction and uncontrolled eating, a new study finds. (2018-03-17)
Study looks at the prevalence, challenges of athletes with ADHD
It's estimated there are more than six million children in the United States with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). (2017-05-11)
Could Hollywood technology help your health?
The same technology used by the entertainment industry to animate characters such as Gollum in 'The Lord of The Rings' films, will be used to help train elite athletes, for medical diagnosis and even to help improve prosthetic limb development, in a new research center at the University of Bath launched today. (2016-05-20)
When treating athletes for heat stroke, 'cool first, transport second'
Athletes who suffer life-threatening heat stroke should be cooled on site before they are taken to the hospital, according to an expert panel's report published in the journal Prehospital Emergency Care. (2018-02-27)
Characteristic pattern of protein deposits in brains of retired NFL players who suffered concussions
A new UCLA study takes another step toward the early understanding of a degenerative brain condition called chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, which affects athletes in contact sports who are exposed to repetitive brain injuries. (2015-04-06)
Test used to diagnose asthma may not be accurate
A new study urges caution in the use of the mannitol challenge test for asthma in non-clinical settings. (2016-12-05)
No guts no glory: Harvesting the microbiome of athletes
Scientists have tapped into the microbiome of elite runners and rowers, and have identified particular bacteria that may aid athletic performance. (2017-08-20)
Middle-aged couch potatoes may reverse heart effects of a sedentary life with exercise training
Two years of exercise training during middle age may reduce or reverse the cardiac consequences of a sedentary lifestyle. (2018-01-08)
For high school baseball pitchers, extra throws on game day add up but go uncounted
For high school baseball pitchers, limiting throws during a game helps to prevent fatigue and injuries. (2018-05-01)
Study with female rugby players shows a regular season of play results in changes in the brain
Researchers at Western University have shown that a regular season of play can cause changes in the brain that are similar to changes caused by concussion, though less severe. (2018-01-17)
Imaging plays key role in evaluating injuries at Olympics
The Olympic Games give elite athletes a chance at athletic triumph, but also carry a risk of injury. (2018-02-26)
Screening programs unlikely to prevent sudden cardiac arrest in competitive athletes
Screening programs for cardiac conditions are not an effective way to prevent sudden cardiac arrest in competitive sport, and may prevent healthy athletes from participating, a new study suggests. (2017-11-15)
Women may be at higher risk for sports-related concussion than men
Women athletes are 50 percent more likely than male athletes to have a sports-related concussion, according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 69th Annual Meeting in Boston, April 22 to 28, 2017. (2017-02-28)
Clemson researcher to present at Connecticut's youth concussion conference
Clemson University researcher Jimmy Sanderson was invited to present at a special session entitled (2014-01-29)
Study: Girl soccer players who give up other sports may feel more stressed, less rested
An abstract of new research being presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics 2017 National Conference & Exhibition found sport specialization was associated with significantly worse mood, stress, fatigue, soreness, and sleep quality among female youth soccer players, even after controlling for factors such as age and hours spent training. (2017-09-15)
Kids born later in the year can still excel in sport
A child's birth month shouldn't affect their long-term prospects in high-level sport and those who hold off on specialising until later years may be the most successful, according to new research from the University of Sydney. (2018-01-31)
New research on the muscles of elite athletes: When quality is better than quantity
A Danish-Swedish research team working on a project led by University of Southern Denmark has discovered that muscle endurance is not only determined by the number of mitochondria, but also their structure. (2016-11-02)
Brain protein predicts recovery time following concussion
Elevated levels of the brain protein tau following concussion are associated with a longer recovery period and may serve as a marker to help physicians determine an athlete's readiness to return to play. (2017-01-06)
How to train like the world's most successful female cross-country skier
If you want to be as fast or as strong as the world's most decorated female winter Olympian ever, you'll have to train a lot -- more than 900 hours a year. (2018-02-16)
Don't let skiing and snowboarding injuries take you downhill
Skiing and snowboarding are fun winter sports. As the popularity of these winter sports continue to rise, according to a review article published in the Jan. (2018-01-12)
More efficient method devised to drug test athletes
It will now be easier, faster and cheaper to catch athletes who take performance-enhancing drugs. (2018-02-08)
Racial stereotypes influence perception of NFL quarterbacks
Racial stereotypes affect the public's perception of NFL quarterbacks and may, in some cases, become a self-fulfilling prophecy for black athletes, new University of Colorado Boulder research shows. (2017-08-21)
Concussion may bring greater risks for athletes with ADHD
Athletes who have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be at greater risk for experiencing persistent anxiety and depression after a concussion than people who do not have ADHD, according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's Sports Concussion Conference in Indianapolis, July 20-22, 2018. (2018-07-12)
Heads up tackling program decreases concussion rates, say researchers
Consistently using a tackling education program appears to help lessen youth football concussion severity and occurrence, say researchers presenting their work today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's Specialty Day in San Diego, Calif. (2017-03-18)
Study shows race, not experience, impacts hiring in sports world
If you want to get your foot in the door of the sports industry, your race may mean more than your experience. (2010-07-07)
Bones show prehistoric women's intensive manual labor during advent of agriculture
Comparisons of bone strength between prehistoric women and living female athletes demonstrate that prehistoric women performed rigorous manual labor for thousands of years in central Europe at levels exceeding those of modern women. (2017-11-29)
Study finds girl soccer players 5 times more likely than boys to return to play same day
A new study found girls were significantly more likely than boys to return to play the same day following a soccer-related concussion, placing them at risk for more significant injury. (2017-09-15)
Severely obese people can reduce risk of atrial fibrillation with exercise
New research suggests that exercise can have a moderating effect on the risk of developing atrial fibrillation. (2018-08-07)
High school athletes with shoulder instability benefit from nonoperative treatment
Nonoperative treatment of high school athletes with shoulder instability is an effective approach, according to research presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's Specialty Day in New Orleans. (2018-03-10)
Open-ended laboratory tests for cyclists could help athletes train better
Scientists at the University of Kent's School of Sport and Exercise Sciences have discovered that cyclists can perform better when they do not have to pace their efforts. (2017-09-25)
Why are women more prone to knee injuries than men?
Researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have found that women who take the birth control pill, which lessen and stabilize estrogen levels, were less likely to suffer serious knee injuries. (2016-03-18)
Previous cortisone injections may increase risk of future rotator cuff repair
Cortisone injections are a common nonsurgical approach to treating rotator cuff injuries. (2018-03-10)
Sports psychologists suffer fear and uncertainty working with elite footballers
Sports psychologists have to cope with 'fear and uncertainty', job insecurity and long working hours when working with elite footballers, research shows. (2017-11-08)
Football players' concussions linked to dyslexia gene
A gene associated with dyslexia, a learning disorder, may make some athletes less susceptible to concussions, reports a new study. (2018-10-23)
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