Popular Atomic Clocks News and Current Events

Popular Atomic Clocks News and Current Events, Atomic Clocks News Articles.
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Rust never sleeps
PNNL researchers have been able to observe in unprecedented detail how rust happens. (2019-02-04)

Drip by drip
How do crystals grow? The answer given in current textbooks is: Layer by layer atoms or molecules settle on an existing crystal surface. The research team Physical Chemistry at the University of Konstanz has now observed a preliminary stage of this crystal growth in glutamic acid that contradicts this classical principal of growth. Not individual atoms settle on an existing crystal surface, but nano-drips that already contain building blocks for growth. (2017-06-21)

X-ray imaging with a significantly enhanced resolution
Physicists from Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) and Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY, Hamburg) have come up with a method that could significantly improve the quality of X-ray images in comparison to conventional methods. Incoherent diffractive imaging (IDI) could help to image individual atoms in nanocrystals or molecules faster and with a much higher resolution. (2017-08-14)

A new way to display the 3-D structure of molecules
Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley Researchers have developed nanoscale display cases that enables new atomic-scale views of hard-to-study chemical and biological samples. (2016-08-18)

WVU astronomers help detect the most massive neutron star ever measured
West Virginia University researchers have helped discover the most massive neutron star to date, a breakthrough uncovered through the Green Bank Telescope. The neutron star, called J0740+6620, is a rapidly spinning pulsar that packs 2.17 times the mass of the sun (which is 333,000 times the mass of the Earth) into a sphere only 20-30 kilometers, or about 15 miles, across. (2019-09-16)

Army project brings quantum internet closer to reality
A US Army research result brings the quantum internet a step closer. Such an internet could offer the military security, sensing and timekeeping capabilities not possible with traditional networking approaches. (2019-09-26)

2D topological physics from shaking a 1D wire
Published in Physical Review X, this new study propose a realistic scheme to observe a 'cold-atomic quantum Hall effect.' (2019-10-03)

Hydrogen bonds directly detected for the first time
For the first time, scientists have succeeded in studying the strength of hydrogen bonds in a single molecule using an atomic force microscope. Researchers from the University of Basel's Swiss Nanoscience Institute network have reported the results in the journal Science Advances. (2017-05-12)

Writing the future of rewritable memory
Scientists at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada have created the most dense, solid-state memory in history that could soon exceed the capabilities of current hard drives by 1,000 times. New technique leads to the densest solid-state memory ever created. (2018-07-23)

First use of graphene to detect cancer cells
By interfacing brain cells onto graphene, researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have shown they can differentiate a single hyperactive cancerous cell from a normal cell, pointing the way to developing a simple, noninvasive tool for early cancer diagnosis. (2016-12-19)

First observation of the hyperfine splitting in antihydrogen
Swansea University scientists are one step closer to answering the question of why matter exists and illuminating the mysteries of the Big Bang and the birth of the universe. (2017-08-03)

Scientists discover new 'architecture' in corn
New research on the US's most economically important agricultural plant -- corn -- has revealed a different internal structure of the plant than previously thought, which can help optimize how corn is converted into ethanol. (2019-01-21)

The atomic dynamics of rare everlasting electric fields
Researchers have discovered the atomic mechanisms that give the unusual material yttrium manganite its rare magnetic and electric properties. All it took was ricocheting neutrons off the atoms of a sample of the material heated to 3,000 degrees Fahrenheit. (2018-01-10)

Exotic state of matter: An atom full of atoms
If the electron orbits the nucleus at a great distance, there is plenty of space in between for other atoms. A 'giant atom' can be created, filled with ordinary atoms. All these atoms form a weak bond, creating a new, exotic state of matter at cold temperatures, referred to as 'Rydberg polarons'. (2018-02-26)

Optical Atomic Clock: A long look at the captured atoms
In the case of one of the candidates for an optical clock which is developed at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, an optical grating clock with strontium atoms, the loading of cold atoms into an optical grating has been optimized to such an extent that approx. 106 strontium atoms are loaded into the grating within 150 milliseconds at a temperature of a few microkelvin. There, the atoms remain stored for over one second and are available for a precision measurement of the optical frequency. (2008-02-05)

Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms
The precise control of electron transport in microelectronics makes complex logic circuits possible that are in daily use in smartphones and laptops. (2017-02-17)

A 3D imaging technique unlocks properties of perovskite crystals
A team of materials scientists from Penn State, Cornell and Argonne National Laboratory have, for the first time, visualized the 3D atomic and electron density structure of the most complex perovskite crystal structure system decoded to date. (2018-12-06)

Scientists discover path to improving game-changing battery electrode
Researchers from Stanford University, two Department of Energy national labs and the battery manufacturer Samsung created a comprehensive picture of how the same chemical processes that give cathodes their high capacity are also linked to changes in atomic structure that sap performance. (2017-12-12)

Diamonds coupled using quantum physics
Researchers at TU Wien have succeeded in coupling the specific defects in two such diamonds with one another. This is an important prerequisite for the development of new applications, such as highly sensitive sensors and switches for quantum computers. (2017-04-10)

The ultimate green technology
Imagine patterning and visualizing silicon at the atomic level, something which, if done successfully, will revolutionize the quantum and classical computing industry. A team of scientists in Edmonton, Canada has done just that, led by a world-renowned physicist and his up-and-coming protégé. (2017-02-13)

Metallic hydrogen, once theory, becomes reality
Nearly a century after it was theorized, Harvard scientists have succeeded in creating metallic hydrogen. In addition to helping scientists answer fundamental questions about the nature of matter, the material is theorized to have a wide range of applications, including as a room-temperature superconductor. (2017-01-26)

From theory to reality: The creation of metallic hydrogen
For more than 80 years, it has been predicted that hydrogen will adopt metallic properties under certain conditions, and now researchers have successfully demonstrated this phenomenon. (2017-01-26)

Alignment of mother and offspring body clock could prevent diseases such as heart disease and obesity
The care provided by a mother can impact the body clock and health of offspring after birth, according to new research published in The Journal of Physiology. By reducing abnormalities in the body clock of offspring, it may be possible to develop therapies for serious lifestyle-related diseases, such as heart disease and obesity. (2018-05-11)

Physics: Toward a practical nuclear pendulum
Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) Munich have, for the first time, measured the lifetime of an excited state in the nucleus of an unstable element. This is a major step toward a nuclear clock that could keep even better time than today's best atomic timekeepers. (2017-01-27)

A new study shows what makes humans look older or younger using artificial intelligence
There are many factors that influence the aging process. Unlocking these factors can lead to valuable insights into what impacts the condition and health of the human body and reveal how to minimize these impacts. Researchers from Haut.AI and Insilico Medicine have developed a simple and accurate predictor of chronological age called the PhotoAgeClock. The new research shows that the corners of the eye are the most important area for age prediction. (2018-11-26)

Nanowires as sensors in new type of atomic force microscope
A new type of atomic force microscope (AFM) uses nanowires as tiny sensors. Unlike standard AFM, the device with a nanowire sensor enables measurements of both the size and direction of forces. Physicists at the University of Basel and at the EPF Lausanne have described these results in the recent issue of Nature Nanotechnology. (2016-10-17)

Scientists win a gold metal for liquid behavior
Researchers at University of Tokyo's Institute of Industrial Science report the first direct observation of atoms moving in liquid by collaborating with National Institute of Materials Science. Using scanning transmission electron microscopy, they find that gold ions diffuse through ionic liquid by a phenomenon they describe as a 'cage-jump.' Image analysis determined the diffusion coefficient and activation energy of the diffusion. Quantification of liquid at the atomic level is expected to contribute to the design of energy efficient devices. (2017-12-15)

More people miss NHS appointments when the clocks go forward
The number of missed hospital outpatient appointments increases following the clock change on March 25 2018. Patients are 5% more likely to miss an appointment in the week after the clocks go forward compared with the previous week. NHS figures show that there were 8 million missed appointments in 2016/17. Each hospital outpatient appointment costs £120 so missed appointments represent a significant financial issue for the NHS and have a negative impact on patient care. (2018-03-23)

Researchers bring high res magnetic resonance imaging to nanometer scale
A new technique that brings magnetic resonance imaging to the nanometer scale with unprecedented resolution will open the door for major advances in understanding new materials, virus particles and proteins that cause diseases like Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. (2018-02-21)

New model considers an extra factor to improve our prediction of nuclear fission
A research group based in a number of countries (Japan, Malaysia, Ukraine, and Germany), led by Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech), have proposed an improved model for predicting the generation of thermal energy from nuclear fission processes, by focusing on Uranium-236. This model can help improve efficiency in nuclear power generation. (2017-12-27)

Microscopy: A space-time sensor for light-matter interactions
Physicists from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have developed an attosecond electron microscope that allows them to visualize the dispersion of light in time and space, and observe the motions of electrons in atoms. (2017-11-30)

Reconsidering damage production and radiation mixing in materials
An international team of researchers present new mathematical equations that with minimal increase in computational complexity allow for accurate and experimentally testable predictions. (2018-03-15)

Researchers quantify factors for reducing power semiconductor resistance by two-thirds
Researchers in Japan announced that they have quantified for the first time the impacts of three electron-scattering mechanisms for determining the resistance of silicon carbide (SiC) power semiconductor devices in power semiconductor modules. They found that resistance under the SiC interface can be reduced by two-thirds by suppressing electron scattering by the charges, a discovery that is expected to help reduce energy consumption in electric power equipment by lowering the resistance of SiC power semiconductors. (2017-12-04)

Spotlight on quantum computing at SXSW 2018
South by Southwest 2018 hosts a panel on March 10th called Quantum Computing: Science Fiction to Science Fact. Experts on quantum computing make up the panel, including Antia Lamas-Linares of the Texas Advanced Computing Center at UT Austin. Lamas-Linares co-authored a study in the Proceedings of the SPIE (February, 2018). The study, 'Secure Quantum Clock Synchronization,' proposed a protocol to verify and secure time synchronization of distant atomic clocks, such as those used for GPS signals in cell phone towers. (2018-03-09)

Nuclear physics' interdisciplinary progress
The theoretical view of the structure of the atom nucleus is not carved in stone. Particularly, nuclear physics research could benefit from approaches found in other fields of physics. Reflections on these aspects were just released in a new type of rapid publications in the new Letters section of EPJ A, which provides a forum for the concise expression of more personal opinions on important scientific matters in the field. (2016-05-10)

First malaria-human contact mapped with Nobel Prize-winning technology
Melbourne scientists have taken a significant step toward developing a new vaccine for malaria, revealing for the first time an 'atomic-scale' blueprint of how the parasite invades human cells. Using the Nobel Prize-winning technology cryo-EM (cryo-electron microscopy), the researchers mapped the previously hidden first contact between Plasmodium vivax malaria parasites and young red blood cells they invade to begin the parasites' spread throughout the body. The discovery was published today in Nature. (2018-06-27)

Researchers at University of Pennsylvania develop method for mass production of nanogap electrodes
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have developed a reliable, reproducible method for parallel fabrication of multiple nanogap electrodes, a development crucial to the creation of mass-produced nanoscale electronics. (2007-08-16)

New research shows how nanowires can be formed
In an article published in Nature today, researchers at Lund University in Sweden show how different arrangements of atoms can be combined into nanowires as they grow. Researchers learning to control the properties of materials this way can lead the way to more efficient electronic devices. (2016-03-17)

Deep Aging Clocks: The emergence of AI-based biomarkers of aging and longevity
The advent of deep biomarkers of aging, longevity and mortality presents a range of non-obvious applications. (2019-07-03)

The sharpest laser in the world
With a linewidth of only 10 mHz, the laser that the researchers from the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) have now developed together with US researchers from JILA, a joint institute of the National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Colorado Boulder, has established a new world record. The results have been published in the current issue of Physical Review Letters. (2017-06-29)

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