Popular Avian Influenza News and Current Events

Popular Avian Influenza News and Current Events, Avian Influenza News Articles.
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Special UV light safely kills airborne flu virus, finds study
Overhead far-UVC light, a type of ultraviolet light that is harmless to humans, effectively killed airborne flu virus, found researchers at Columbia University. The lighting may offer a new weapon against the spread of flu virus in public spaces. (2018-02-09)

Eating the flu
Given the importance and wide distribution of Influenza A viruses, it is surprising how little is known about infections of wild mammals. A new study led by Alex D. Greenwood and Gábor Á. Czirják of the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) in Berlin sheds light on which species are commonly infected and why. (2019-03-06)

CDDEP report highlights tremendous burden from infectious diseases in SEAR countries
Washington, DC / New Delhi, India - Researchers at CDDEP, in collaboration with leading experts in the field, have produced the ''Infectious Diseases in the South-East Asia Region'' report, which examines cross-boundary challenges in communicable disease control in countries in the South-and South-East Asia region. The report emphasizes infectious diseases related to other sources of disease burden in the region and communicates overall trends in the health and economic burden they impose. (2021-02-23)

Houston Methodist launches real-time flu tracker website
Pathologists at Houston Methodist developed a real-time website to track flu cases, just in time to assist physicians, the CDC and patients for the fall 2018 flu season. (2018-12-06)

How well will the flu vaccine work this winter?
Scientists from UTMB and Biomed Protection predicted which H3N2 variants would become 'vaccine resistant', and this prediction has been confirmed during the 2017 Australian flu season. The results published suggest that the current flu vaccine will work better during the 2018 US flu season than the 2017 Australian flu season. (2017-12-13)

Drug safety for penguins
Researchers from the University of Liverpool have determined the most effective drug dose to help penguins in managed care fight off disease. (2017-08-04)

Chick embryos provide valuable genetic data for understanding human development
An international collaboration of researchers from Japan, Russia, Spain, and Australia has created the first genome-wide set of avian transcription start sites. Their data have been made available through the web-based, open-access, interactive DNA visualization system, ZENBU. ('Zenbu' means 'all' in Japanese.) The database and their CAGE-based TSS mapping method are expected to greatly facilitate research on the early development of amniotes, a group of vertebrate animals including the mammals, birds and reptiles. (2017-12-01)

Maternal vaccination again influenza associated with protection for infants
How long does the protection from a mother's immunization against influenza during pregnancy last for infants after they are born? (2016-07-05)

Bacterial fibers critical to human and avian infection
Researchers at the Biodesign Institute targeted a specific group of threadlike fibers known as E. coli common pilus, which adorn bacterial cell surfaces. In the first study of its kind, they analyzed the way these structures contribute to avian pathogenic E. coli's ability to cause infection and form dense cell aggregates known as biofilms. (2014-02-05)

Birds become immune to influenza
An influenza infection in birds gives a good protection against other subtypes of the virus, like a natural vaccination, according to a new study. (2017-06-30)

Advanced genetic screening method may speed vaccine development
Vaccines remain the best line of defense against deadly pathogens and now Kathryn Sykes and Stephen Johnston, researchers at Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute, along with co-author Michael McGuire from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center are using clever functional screening methods to attempt to speed new vaccines into production that are both safer and more potent. (2012-05-09)

ID'ing features of flu virus genome may help target surveillance for pandemic flu
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified features of the influenza virus genome that affect how well the virus multiplies. These features are similar but not identical across viral strains. It's possible that the extent of similarity between strains influences whether two flu viruses can mix their genetic material to make a hybrid virus with the potential to explode into pandemic flu. (2018-01-31)

Annual influenza vaccination does not prevent natural immunity
Earlier studies have suggested that having repeated annual influenza vaccination can prevent natural immunity to the virus, and potentially increase the susceptibility to influenza illness in the event of a pandemic, or when the vaccine does not 'match' the virus circulating in the community. But now, researchers at the Influenza Center in Bergen have published a study, which concludes that annual influenza vaccination does not increase susceptibility to influenza infection in years of vaccine mismatch. (2017-11-13)

Massive data analysis shows what drives the spread of flu in the US
Using several large datasets describing health care visits, geographic movements and demographics of more than 150 million people over nine years, researchers at the University of Chicago have created models that predict the spread of influenza throughout the United States each year. (2018-02-27)

Influenza in the tropics shows variable seasonality
Whilst countries in the tropics and subtropics exhibit diverse patterns of seasonal flu activity, they can be grouped into eight geographical zones to optimise vaccine formulation and delivery timing, according to a study published April 27, 2016 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE. (2016-04-27)

New book examines ecology of threatened prairie-chickens
A new volume in the Cooper Ornithological Society's Studies in Avian Biology series highlights the ecology of lesser prairie-chickens. (2016-03-11)

Could gulls' wings inspire smarter airplane design?
Flexing a single elbow joint enables gulls to adapt their wing shape to gusty conditions, according to new University of British Columbia (UBC) research--a relatively simple mechanism that could inspire improved aircraft design. (2019-01-03)

Horses get the flu, too
Flu vaccines for horses haven't been updated in more than 25 years, but researchers have developed a new live equine influenza vaccine that's safe and more protective than existing vaccines. Proactively preventing the spread of flu in animals is important, as animals are the most likely source of future human pandemics. Animals can be infected with multiple influenza viruses and have the potential to act as 'mixing vessels,' generating new strains that could infect people. (2018-04-30)

The early bird got to fly: Archaeopteryx was an active flyer
The question of whether the Late Jurassic dino-bird Archaeopteryx was an elaborately feathered ground dweller, a glider, or an active flyer has fascinated palaeontologists for decades. Valuable new information obtained with state-of-the-art synchrotron microtomography at the ESRF, the European Synchrotron (Grenoble, France), allowed an international team of scientists to answer this question in Nature Communications. The wing bones of Archaeopteryx were shaped for incidental active flight, but not for the advanced style of flying mastered by today's birds. (2018-03-13)

Scientists to build the avian tree of life
With the support of the National Science Foundation, scientists have embarked on a large-scale project to build the evolutionary tree of all bird species using cutting-edge technologies to collect DNA from across the genome. This project, called OpenWings, will produce the most complete evolutionary tree of any vertebrate group to-date. (2018-04-11)

Flu vaccine prevents hospitalization in children
Children vaccinated against influenza are significantly less likely to experience serious complications from the virus that could land them in hospital, new research from Public Health Ontario (PHO) and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) has found. (2017-11-17)

Early detection of highly pathogenic influenza viruses
Lack of appropriate drugs and vaccines during the influenza A virus pandemic in 2009, the recent Ebola epidemic in West Africa, as well as the ongoing Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome-Coronavirus outbreak demonstrates that the world is only insufficiently prepared for global attacks of emerging infectious diseases and that the handling of such threats remains a great challenge. (2015-06-23)

Antibiotics legitimately available in over-counter throat medications could contribute to increased antibiotic resistance
New research presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16) shows that the inappropriate of use of antibiotics legitimately available in over-the-counter (OTC) throat medications could be contributing to antibiotic resistance, thereby going against World Health Organization (WHO) goals. (2019-04-11)

Influenza vaccine delays are a problem for pediatricians
Uptake of influenza vaccine among children is low compared to other childhood vaccines, and missed opportunities for vaccination play an important role in this low uptake. Problems with receiving influenza vaccine in a timely manner within pediatric practices are an important cause of missed opportunities, but little is known about pediatricians' experiences and practices related to influenza vaccine delivery delays. (2018-05-05)

Nanoparticle vaccine offers universal protection against influenza a viruses, study finds
Researchers have developed a universal vaccine to combat influenza A viruses that produces long-lasting immunity in mice and protects them against the limitations of seasonal flu vaccines, according to a study led by Georgia State University. (2018-01-24)

Expert panel reviews neuraminidase inhibitors for the prevention and treatment of influenza
An ECDC expert opinion concludes that there is clear evidence supporting the use of neuraminidase inhibitors in the treatment and prevention of influenza. Moreover, the current recommendations in European countries on the use of the neuraminidase inhibitors oseltamivir and zanamivir are appropriate and should be applied by prescribing physicians. (2017-08-16)

An itch you can't scratch: Researchers find 'itch receptors' in the throats of mice
Working with mice, Johns Hopkins researchers report they have found previously known skin itch receptors in the airways that appear to contribute to bronchoconstriction and airway hypersensitivity, hallmarks of asthma and other respiratory disorders. The investigators' experiments in mice suggest that the receptors' activation directly aggravates airway constriction and--if the same process is active in people--may be a promising new target for the development of drug therapies. (2018-03-09)

Researchers shed new light on influenza detection
Notre Dame Researchers have discovered a way to make influenza visible to the naked eye, by engineering dye molecules to target a specific enzyme of the virus. (2017-05-05)

How proteins help influenza A bind and slice its way to cells
Researchers have provided new insight on how two proteins help influenza A virus particles fight their way to human cells. (2019-05-14)

Access to asthma meds, plus flu vaccines, keep kids with asthma healthy
Kids need flu shots to prevent asthma flares, and medications available in school to keep 86 percent in class, according to two studies being presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Annual Scientific Meeting. (2016-11-11)

LSTM and Imperial College Researchers design new anti-influenza drugs
Researchers at LSTM and Imperial College London have designed drugs which could help combat any potential new flu pandemic, by targeting the receptors of the cells by which the virus gains entry to the human body. (2019-01-25)

Influenza viruses can hide from the immune system
Influenza is able to mask itself, so that the virus is not initially detected by our immune system. This is the result of new research from Aarhus University. The researchers behind the study hope that the discovery can be used to develop better treatment against influenza and chronic inflammation conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. (2016-02-23)

Certain flu virus mutations may compensate for fitness costs of other mutations
Seasonal flu viruses continually undergo mutations that help them evade the human immune system, but some of these mutations can reduce a virus's potency. According to new research published in PLOS Pathogens, certain mutations in the genome of influenza A may help counteract the weakening effects of other mutations. (2018-01-18)

Mobilizing white blood cells to the lung: New discovery could lead to an improved influenza vaccine
Findings just published in the scientific journal Immunity by researchers at the Trudeau Institute shed new light on how a previously-unknown messaging mechanism within the human immune system prompts specific influenza-fighting cells to the lung airways during an infection. (2008-07-10)

Health chiefs failing to investigate rising deaths in England and Wales, argue experts
Health chiefs are failing to investigate a clear pattern of rising death rates and worsening health outcomes in England and Wales, argue experts in The BMJ today. (2018-03-14)

UC Davis researchers find quiet viruses alter body's response to vaccines, pathogens
UC Davis researchers have shown that low levels of cytomegalovirus (CMV) have a significant impact on microbe and immune cell populations and how the immune system responds to the influenza vaccine. The study was published in the Journal of Virology. (2018-08-03)

Swine flu monitoring needed for farm workers, study says
A University of Alberta study recommends that workers on pig farms be monitored as part of influenza pandemic preparedness. (2008-02-11)

Wrens' calls reveal subtle differences between subspecies
Birds' songs and the ways they vary between places have been well studied--but what can the simpler vocalizations known as calls tell us about bird biology? A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances provides the first detailed description of how Marsh Wren calls vary across eastern North America and hints at the evolutionary processes playing out between wren subspecies. (2017-12-27)

Mutation explains why some people are more vulnerable to viral brain infection
Scientists identified mutations in a single gene that impair immunity to viruses in a region of the brain called the brain stem. (2018-02-22)

Scientists analyze dispersal of parasites by birds in the Americas
An international study investigates transmission of microorganisms that cause malaria and other diseases from migratory to resident avian species. The pioneering study was based on an analysis of malaria parasites in blood samples taken from more than 24,000 migratory and resident birds in 23 countries throughout the Americas. (2017-03-15)

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