Popular Bacterium News and Current Events

Popular Bacterium News and Current Events, Bacterium News Articles.
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Stress may protect -- at least in bacteria
Antibiotics harm bacteria and stress them. Trimethoprim, an antibiotic, inhibits the growth of the bacterium Escherichia coli and induces a stress response. This response also protects the bacterium from subsequent deadly damage from acid. Antibiotics can therefore increase the survival chances of bacteria under certain conditions. This is shown in a study by researchers at IST Austria (Karin Mitosch, Georg Rieckh and Tobias Bollenbach), which was published in the journal Cell Systems. (2017-03-23)

Healthy fat hidden in dirt may fend off anxiety disorders
Thirty years after scientists first suggested that increased exposure to microorganisms could benefit health, CU Boulder researchers have identified an anti-inflammatory fat in a soil-dwelling bacterium that may be partly responsible. Someday, they hope to use it to develop an immunization against stress-related disorders. (2019-05-29)

TB tricks the body's immune system to allow it to spread
Tuberculosis tricks the immune system into attacking the body's lung tissue so the bacteria are allowed to spread to other people, new research from the University of Southampton suggests. (2016-10-20)

New drug lead identified in fight against TB
Antibacterial compounds found in soil could spell the beginnings of a new, much-needed treatment for tuberculosis, new research led by the University of Sydney has found. tuberculosis (TB) causes more deaths than any other infectious disease including HIV/AIDs. In 2015 there were an estimated 10.4 million new cases of TB and 1.4 million deaths from the disease. (2017-03-01)

Microcensus in bacteria
Bacillus subtilis can determine proportions of different groups within a mixed population. (2020-03-05)

An oil-eating bacterium that can help clean up pollution and spills
Oil spills occur on a regular basis, leading to messy decontamination challenges. But however widespread and serious the damage may be, the solution could be microscopic -- Alcanivorax borkumensis -- a bacterium that feeds on hydrocarbons. A research team at INRS show the effectiveness of enzymes produced by the bacterium in degrading petroleum products in soil and water. Their results offer hope for a simple, effective, and eco-friendly method of decontaminating water and soil at oil sites. (2018-04-09)

Microbial fuel cell converts methane to electricity
Transporting methane from gas wellheads to market provides multiple opportunities for this greenhouse gas to leak into the atmosphere. Now, an international team of researchers has taken the first step in converting methane directly to electricity using bacteria, in a way that could be done near the drilling sites. (2017-05-17)

How our immune system targets TB
Researchers have seen, for the very first time, how the human immune system recognizes tuberculosis (TB). These findings are the crucial step in developing better diagnostics and perhaps even vaccines for this deadly infection. (2016-12-06)

Biophysics: Bacterial adhesion in vitro and in silico
Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich researchers have characterized the physical mechanism that enables a widespread bacterial pathogen to adhere to the tissues of its human host. (2018-03-29)

New 'movie' technique reveals bacterial signalling in sharper resolution
John Innes Centre researchers used a study of the plant-growth promoting bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens to develop an advanced analysis method which, they hope, will increase our capacity to understand plant and human diseases. (2017-10-05)

WSU researchers discover unique microbial photosynthesis
Researchers at Washington State University have discovered a new type of cooperative photosynthesis that could be used in engineering microbial communities for waste treatment and bioenergy production. (2017-01-09)

Monash University study finds way to disarm dangerous bacteria
Researchers from the Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute (BDI) have discovered an antibiotic that could prevent the life-threatening diarrhoea caused by Clostridioides difficile -- a serious bacterial infection often acquired in hospital. The treatment strategy could also potentially counter diseases caused by other similar spore-producing bacteria, including the lethal anthrax, a key bioterrorism tool. (2019-08-12)

Scientists unearth secrets of Sir Alexander Fleming's medical breakthroughs
A century after Sir Alexander Fleming made two of the most important medical breakthroughs, scientists have unlocked the secret of how his discoveries may contribute to recurrent patient infections. (2018-02-15)

Salmonella: Trickier than we imagined
Salmonella is serving up a surprise not only for tomato lovers around the country but also for scientists who study the rod-shaped bacterium that causes misery for millions of people. Researchers have identified a molecular trick that may explain part of the bacteria's fierceness: A protein allows the bacteria to maintain a low profile in the body, giving Salmonella crucial time to gain a foothold before the immune system is roused to fight the invader. (2008-06-13)

Bacterial and host cell proteins interact to regulate Chlamydia's 'exit strategy'
Interactions between Chlamydia trachomatis proteins and host cell proteins help determine whether the bacterium leaves an infected cell via breakdown of the cellular membrane (lysis) or in a membrane-bound package, according to new research published in PLOS Pathogens by Phu Hai Nguyen of the National Institutes of Health, US, and colleagues. (2018-03-15)

Modified mushrooms may yield human drugs
Mushrooms might serve as biofactories for the production of various beneficial human drugs, according to plant pathologists who have inserted new genes into mushrooms. (2007-06-22)

Buffalo fly faces Dengue nemesis
Australian beef cattle researchers trial the use of insect-infecting bacterium Wolbachia to tackle buffalo fly, a major blood-sucking pest that costs the industry $100 million a year in treatments and lost production. (2020-11-03)

Rare proteins collapse earlier
Some organisms are able to survive in hot springs, while others can only live at mild temperatures because their proteins aren't able to withstand such extreme heat. ETH researchers investigated these differences and showed that often only a few key proteins determine the life and heat-induced death of a cell. (2017-02-28)

Scientists find potential weapons for the battle against antibiotic resistance
UNC School of Medicine scientists found that the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa can produce specific molecular factors that dramatically increase or decrease an antibiotic's ability to kill Staphylococcus aureus, another bacterium that often co-infects with P. aeruginosa. The findings, published in PLoS Biology, point to the possibility of new antibiotics employing these factors to enhance antibiotic susceptibility. (2017-12-05)

Variation between strains may account for differences in vulnerability to infection
New research shows that subtle differences between bacterial strains may cause dramatic differences in outcome between people infected with the same microbe. (2018-01-11)

Vitamin B12: Power broker to the microbes
In the microbial world, vitamin B12 is a hot commodity. It turns out that vitamin B12, a substance produced by only a few organisms but needed by nearly all of them, wields great power in microbial communities -- ubiquitous structures that affect energy and food production, the environment, and human health. (2017-01-30)

UM researchers: Bacterial diversity's shelf life longer than previously expected
University of Montana scientists have published a study showing that bacterial diversity may stick around millions of years longer than previously thought. (2018-01-30)

Team IDs weakness in anthrax bacteria
MIT and New York University researchers have identified a weakness in the defenses of the anthrax bacterium that could be exploited to produce new antibiotics. (2008-01-24)

Time to put TB on a diet!
The tuberculosis bacillus is growing resistant to antibiotics. For this reason, biochemists at UNIGE are attempting to identify the mechanisms that enable the bacterium to reproduce, spread and survive in latent form in our macrophages. The scientists have discovered that the bacterium has the ability to 'reprogram' the cell it infects so that it can feed on its lipids. This results will pave the way for treatment opportunities based on starving and weakening the bacterium. (2017-01-19)

Inflammation awakens sleepers
The inflammatory response that is supposed to ward off pathogens that cause intestinal disease makes this even worse. This is because special viruses integrate their genome into Salmonella, which further strengthens the pathogen. (2017-03-29)

These bacteria produce gold by digesting toxic metals
High concentrations of heavy metals, like copper and gold, are toxic for most living creatures. This is not the case for the bacterium C. metallidurans, which has found a way to extract valuable trace elements from a compound of heavy metals without poisoning itself. One interesting side-effect: the formation of tiny gold nuggets. A team of researchers led by Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) has discovered the molecular processes that take place inside the bacteria. (2018-01-31)

How tuberculosis hides in the body
The tuberculosis vaccine only works for children. BCG (bacille Calmette-Guerin) doesn't protect you as an adult. Now we know more about how the bacterium avoids being detected, which is an important step towards better treatment. (2017-09-28)

Cortexyme announces publication of foundational data for groundbreaking approach to treating Alzheimer's disease in Science Advances
An international team of researchers led by Cortexyme co-founders Stephen Dominy, M.D. and Casey Lynch detail the role of a common bacterium, Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), in driving Alzheimer's disease pathology and demonstrate the potential for small molecule inhibitors to block the pathogen. (2019-01-23)

An unusual form of antibiotic resistance in pandemic cholera
Researchers at the University of Georgia have now shown that the enzyme that makes the El Tor family of V. cholerae resistant to those antibiotics has a different mechanism of action from any comparable proteins observed in bacteria so far. Understanding that mechanism better equips researchers to overcome the challenge it presents in a world with increasing antibiotic resistance. The results of this research are published in the Dec. 22 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry. (2018-01-03)

Oregon researchers discover novel anti-inflammatory bacterial protein
Researchers at the University of Oregon have identified a novel protein secreted by a common gut bacterium in zebrafish that reduces inflammation in the gut and delays death by septic shock. (2018-11-06)

The world's most spoken language is...'Terpene'
If you're small, smells are a good way to stand out. A team of researchers led by the Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW) has demonstrated for the first time that two different types of micro-organisms -- bacteria and fungi -- use fragrances, known as terpenes, to hold conversations. And that's not all. 'We actually believe that terpenes are the most popular chemical medium on our planet to communicate through.' (2017-04-13)

A bacterium that attacks burn victims will soon be unarmed
The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is amongst the main causes of infections and sepsis in people suffering from severe burns. Researchers at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, have succeeded in revealing the dynamics of the pathogen's physiology and metabolism during its growth in exudates, the biological fluids that seep out of burn wounds. This study allows to follow the strategies developed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa to proliferate and, thus, to guide the development of innovative treatments. (2018-02-27)

Oldest bubonic plague genome decoded
An international team of researchers led by the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History has analyzed two 3,800-year-old Y. pestis genomes that suggest a Bronze Age origin for bubonic plague. The study, published in the journal Nature Communications, shows that this strain is the oldest sequenced to date that contains the virulence factors considered characteristic of the bubonic plague and is ancestral to the strain that caused the Black Death. (2018-06-08)

How the immune system identifies invading bacteria
Never-before-seen images of mouse immune system proteins and bacterial bits reveal an inspection strategy that identifies pathogens. (2017-11-16)

A biological solution to carbon capture and recycling?
Scientists at the University of Dundee have discovered that E. coli bacteria could hold the key to an efficient method of capturing and storing or recycling carbon dioxide. Professor Frank Sargent and colleagues at the University of Dundee's School of Life Sciences, working with local industry partners Sasol UK and Ingenza Ltd, have developed a process that enables the E. coli bacterium to act as a very efficient carbon capture device. (2018-01-08)

Fighting rice fungus
Plant scientists are uncovering more clues critical to disarming a fungus that leads to rice blast disease and devastating crop losses. (2015-12-22)

Calcium induces chronic lung infections
The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a life-threatening pathogen in hospitals. About ten percent of all nosocomial infections, in particular pneumonia, are caused by this pathogen. Researchers from the University of Basel's Biozentrum, have now discovered that calcium induces the switch from acute to chronic infection. In Nature Microbiology the researchers have also reported why antibiotics are less effective in fighting the pathogen in its chronic state. (2016-10-24)

Swamp microbe has pollution-munching power
Sewage treatment may be an unglamorous job, but bacteria are happy to do it. Sewage plants rely on bacteria to remove environmental toxins from waste so that the processed water can be safely discharged into oceans and rivers. Now, a bacterium discovered by Princeton researchers in a New Jersey swamp may offer a more efficient method for treating toxins found in sewage, fertilizer runoff and other forms of water pollution. (2018-04-11)

Complex bacterium writes new evolutionary story
A University of Queensland-led international study has discovered a new type of bacterial structure which has previously only been seen in more complex cells. Research team leader UQ School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences microbiologist Emeritus Professor John Fuerst said the study had found pore-like structures in a bacterium called Gemmata obscuriglobus. (2017-02-01)

A European origin for leprosy?
New research by an international team has revealed that there was much more diversity in the leprosy strains circulating in Medieval Europe than previously thought. This finding, based on the sequencing of 10 new ancient genomes from the leprosy-causing bacterium Mycobacterium leprae, complicates prior assumptions about the origin and spread of the disease, and also includes the oldest M. leprae genome sequenced to date, from about 400 AD in the United Kingdom. (2018-05-10)

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