Popular Balance News and Current Events

Popular Balance News and Current Events, Balance News Articles.
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Storage wars
One answer to our greenhouse gas challenges may be right under our feet: Soil scientists Oliver Chadwick of UC Santa Barbara and Marc Kramer of Washington State University have found that minerals in soil can hold on to a significant amount of carbon pulled from the atmosphere. It's a mechanism that could potentially be exploited as the world tries to shift its carbon economy. (2019-01-02)

How physical activity and sedentary time affect adolescents' bones
A large prospective study in 309 adolescent boys and girls underscores the importance of physical activity for developing bone strength during growth. Adolescents who participated in moderate to intense physical activity during growth spurt years exhibited greater bone mass in areas that contribute to superior bone strength. The study also found mixed effects of sedentary time. (2017-03-22)

Virtual reality motion sickness may be predicted and counteracted
Researchers at the University of Waterloo have made progress towards predicting who is likely to feel sick from virtual reality technology. (2018-09-27)

Bacteria take a deadly risk to survive
Bacteria need mutations -- changes in their DNA code -- to survive under difficult circumstances. When necessary, they can even mutate at different speeds. This is shown in a recent study by the Centre of Microbial and Plant Genetics at KU Leuven (University of Leuven), Belgium. The findings open up various new avenues for research, ranging from more efficient biofuel production methods to a better treatment for bacterial infections and cancer. (2017-05-02)

Simple tests may predict older patients' risk of falling while hospitalized
Simple Tests May Predict Older Patients' Risk of Falling While Hospitalized A study of 807 older individuals admitted to hospital found that those who had poorer physical function at the time of admission were more likely to fall during their hospital stay; 329 falls occurred in 189 patients, including 161 injurious falls, of which 24 were serious. (2018-02-09)

Don't mix business with pleasure
In working life it's now almost expected that employees answer work-related emails after hours, or take their laptops with them on holiday. But the blurring of boundaries between work and personal life can affect people's sense of well-being and lead to exhaustion. This is according to Ariane Wepfer of the University of Zurich in Switzerland who, together with her colleagues, published a study in Springer's Journal of Business and Psychology. (2017-12-12)

New hope for treating heart failure
Heart failure patients who are getting by on existing drug therapies can look forward to a far more effective medicine in the next five years or so, thanks to University of Alberta researchers. (2017-03-07)

Ball games and circuit strength training boost bone health in schoolchildren
The type of exercise that children get in school does make a difference. This is shown by a major Danish study from researchers at the University of Southern Denmark and University of Copenhagen. Eight to ten-year-old schoolchildren develop stronger bones, increased muscular strength and improved balance when ball games or circuit training are on the timetable. (2018-02-08)

Trends in kids' fitness not as bad as assumed
A 10-year study of more than 5,000 young children shows that first graders around Baden-Baden, Germany, have remained reasonably fit over the last decade. While aerobic fitness declined in boys, speed and balance increased in both sexes. The researchers attribute the surprisingly positive results to increased participation in organized sports throughout Germany over the past several years. (2017-10-31)

UPV/EHU researchers account for the complex symptoms of Angelman syndrome
A research group at the Faculty of Science and Technology of the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country has managed to reliably identify the changes in the proteins altered by the UBE3A enzyme, responsible for Angelman syndrome. This disease causes problems in intellectual and motor development, epilepsy, difficulties in communication, and very few hours of sleep. Funding provided by the Angelman Syndrome Association has been a key factor in being able to complete the research. (2018-04-19)

Fixing the role of nitrogen in coral bleaching
A unique investigation highlights how excess nitrogen can trigger coral bleaching in the absence of heat stress. (2017-06-05)

Healthy weight gain in infants
With nearly 10 percent of infants considered 'high weight for length,' University of Delaware researcher Jillian Trabulsi wants to help babies achieve a healthy weight starting with their first months of life. At the fourth International Conference on Nutrition and Growth in Amsterdam, she and colleague Julie Mennella presented preliminary findings about babies on a cow's milk formula, who had accelerated weight gain, compared to babies fed a hydrolyzed protein formula, who had weight gain similar to breastfed infants. (2017-03-20)

How bacteria manipulate plants
Attack at the protein front: Xanthomonas bacteria cause diseases in tomato and pepper plants and inject harmful proteins into plant cells. Researchers from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), the University of Bonn, the University of Freiburg and the Leibniz Institute of Plant Biochemistry (IPB) in Halle have now discovered how one of these proteins manipulates the nutrient supply and hormonal balance of plants. Their study was recently published in the renowned journal (2018-02-21)

Antarctic ice loss
Professor Jonathan Bamber at the University of Bristol and colleagues estimated the flux of ice from the ice sheet into the ocean from satellite data that cover 85 percent of Antarctica's coastline. They arrived at a best estimate of a loss of 132 billion tons of ice in 2006 from West Antarctica -- up from about 83 billion tons in 1996 -- and a loss of about 60 billion tons in 2006 from the Antarctic Peninsula. (2008-01-13)

Greenhouse gas effect consistent over 420 million years
New calculations show that sensitivity of Earth's climate to changes in the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2) has been consistent for the last 420 million years, according to an article in Nature by geologists at Yale and Wesleyan Universities. The study confirms that in the Earth's past 420 million years, each doubling of atmospheric CO2 translates to an average global temperature increase of about 3° Celsius, or 5° Fahrenheit. (2007-03-28)

Organism responsible for paralytic shellfish poisoning may affect fisheries
New research by scientists at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology suggests that ingestion of toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense changes the energy balance and reproductive potential of Calanus finmarchicus in the North Atlantic, which is key food source for young fishes, including many commercially important species. (2016-05-27)

In test of wisdom, new research favors Yoda over Spock
A person's ability to reason wisely about a challenging situation may improve when they also experience diverse yet balanced emotions, say researchers from the University of Waterloo. (2019-01-28)

FASEB Journal: Caloric intake and muscle mass at high altitude
New research in The FASEB Journal explored why a group of young, healthy adults residing at high altitude lost muscle mass while severely underfed and consuming the same high-protein diet that preserved muscle during weight loss at sea level. (2018-06-07)

Usher syndrome: Gene therapy restores hearing and balance
Scientists from the Institut Pasteur, Inserm, the CNRS, Collège de France, University Pierre et Marie Curie, and University Clermont Auvergne, have recently restored hearing and balance in a mouse model of Usher syndrome type 1G characterized by profound congenital deafness and vestibular disorders caused by severe dysmorphogenesis of the mechanoelectrical transduction apparatus of the inner ear's sensory cells. These findings open up new possibilities for the development of gene therapy treatments for hereditary forms of deafness. (2017-09-22)

UQ study shines a light to understand the body's balance system
Finding out what's happening in the brains of people with balance disorders, such as vertigo, might be one step closer following new research on the vestibular system, which controls balance and movement. An interdisciplinary University of Queensland team of optical physicists and biologists has found a novel way, using optical tweezers, or focused beams of light, to understand the vestibular system while animals are still, not moving. (2017-10-05)

Dancing can reverse the signs of aging in the brain
Physical exercise has an anti-aging effect on the hippocampus region of the brain -- an area that controls memory, learning and balance. A new study, comparing different forms of exercise -- dancing and endurance training -- undertaken by elderly volunteers for eighteen months, shows that both can have an anti-aging effect on the brain, but only dancing corresponded to a noticeable difference in behavior. This difference is attributed to the extra challenge of learning dancing routines. (2017-08-25)

Hepatitis therapy: Kupffer cells adjust the balance between pathogen control and hepatocyte regenera
Scientists from TWINCORE have now published new insights on the processes involved in liver inflammation in the Journal of Hepatology: Type I interferons, on the one hand, limit viral replication and thereby help the immune cells to control the viral pathogen. On the other hand, type I interferons delay the regeneration of immune cells, which are important to adjust and maintain the immune balance within the liver during acute inflammation. (2018-01-17)

Researchers reveal new insights into how your brain keeps its balance
An interdisciplinary team of scientists from The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) and The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) discovered that two large protein kinases, ATM and ATR, cooperate to help establish the go/stop balance in human brains. (2018-01-22)

Do differences in anatomy matter for achieving orgasm?
A recent review of the medical literature reveals that differences in anatomy may help explain why some individuals experience orgasms more successfully than others. (2016-04-07)

Biofuels from algae: A budding technology yet to become viable
Despite high expectations and extensive research and investment in the last decade, technological options are still in developing stages and key resources for algal growth are still too onerous for economically viable production of algal biofuels, according to a JRC literature review. No large-scale, commercial algae-to-biofuels facilities have been implemented up until the end of 2015. (2016-02-29)

Immune deficiency and balance disorder result from single gene defect
A genetic defect that causes a severe immune deficiency in humans may also produce balance disorders, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Iowa, the Jackson Laboratory and East Carolina University. (2008-02-21)

Day and night temperature differences influence global patterns in leaf size
A comprehensive analysis of global patterns in leaf size offers an answer to one of the longest-standing questions in plant ecology -- why plant leaf size increases at lower latitudes -- scientists now report. (2017-08-31)

Study examines the impact of climate change on freshwater species
How might climate change affect the distribution of freshwater species living in rivers, ponds, and lakes? Investigators examined the capacity of species to shift their distributions in response to climate change using modeled projections of 527 freshwater species in New South Wales, Australia. (2016-12-05)

Your cell phone could curb the intensity of your workout
Talking or texting on a cell phone during exercise will lower the intensity of a workout and also affect balance. (2017-01-13)

The role of vitamin D in a healthy pregnancy
For a pregnancy to proceed to term, early modulation of the immunologic response is required to induce tolerance to the fetus. (2018-06-20)

Serotonin deficiency implicated in rheumatoid arthritis
For the first time, serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) has been directly implicated in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A report in The American Journal of Pathology shows that experimentally-induced RA in serotonin-deficient mice is worse than disease reported in controls and that some effects of RA can be reduced by serotonin or its agonists (compounds that activate serotonin receptors). (2016-03-09)

Carbon satellite to serve as an important tool for politicians and climate change experts
A new satellite that measures and provides detailed carbon balance information is one of the most important new tools in carbon measurement since infrared light, believe researchers from the University of Copenhagen. The researchers expect the satellite to be a valuable tool for the UN's work on climate change related to the Paris climate accord. (2018-05-08)

Big Data analysis identifies new cancer risk genes
Researchers at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) in Barcelona developed a new method to systematically identify genes contributing to heritable cancer risk. Their work, which is published in Nature Communications, is a success story for data sharing and openness in science. Just three researchers identified new cancer genes only using publically available data. (2018-07-10)

Researchers discover new pathway for handling stress
Researchers at the University of California San Diego studying how animals respond to infections have found a new pathway that may help in tolerating stressors that damage proteins. Naming the pathway the Intracellular Pathogen Response or 'IPR,' the scientists say it is a newly discovered way for animals to cope with certain types of stress and attacks, including heat shock. (2017-11-06)

New research is using drones to tackle climate change
A team of Nottingham scientists is using drones to survey woody climbing plants and better understand how they may affect the carbon balance of tropical rainforests. (2019-01-09)

How bats carry viruses without getting sick
Bats are known to harbor highly pathogenic viruses like Ebola or Marburg and yet they do not show clinical signs of disease. In a paper published in the journal Cell Host & Microbe on February 22, scientists at the Wuhan Institute of Virology in China find that in bats, an antiviral immune pathway called the STING-interferon pathway is dampened, and bats can maintain just enough defense against illness without triggering a heightened immune reaction. (2018-02-22)

Strategic indulgence key to maximizing the college experience
Students who are focused on long term goals maximize their college experience by engaging in 'strategic indulgence,' according to new research being published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science. (2018-08-22)

Video game improves balance in youth with autism
Playing a video game that rewards participants for holding various (2017-11-21)

New approach for matching production and consumption of renewable electricity
VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland is coordinating the BALANCE project, which brings together leading European research institutes in the field of electrochemical conversion. (2017-03-06)

First-graders fitter than expected
Childhood obesity is often attributed to a lack of exercise. So what about sports among elementary school students? A team from the Technical University of Munich pursued this question and collected the results of fitness tests for first-year students over a period of one decade. Their study shows that students did not lose their strength. Speed or balance even increased over the time of 10 years. One change was in the boys, whose endurance decreased compared to the girls of the same age. (2017-11-17)

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