Popular Bay News and Current Events

Popular Bay News and Current Events, Bay News Articles.
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Researchers study how to improve southern sea otter survival
Analysis of 13 years of demographic and genetic data from 1,006 sea otters to assess multiple effective population size estimators, as well as temporal trends in genetic diversity and population genetic structure, show a need for development of new delisting criteria for the southern sea otter. (2018-05-01)

McGill researchers find oldest rocks on Earth
McGill University researchers have discovered the oldest rocks on Earth -- a discovery which sheds more light on our planet's mysterious beginnings. These rocks, known as (2008-09-25)

NASA sees powerful storms with advancing monsoon in Bay of Bengal
Storms associated with the advancing monsoon in the Northern Indian Ocean's Bay of Bengal were analyzed by NASA with the GPM or Global Precipitation Measurement mission core satellite. (2017-05-23)

Right beneath the skin we all have the same bacteria
In the dermis skin layer, the same bacteria are found across age and gender. This has been shown by researchers from the University of Copenhagen in a new study which has studied skin samples from knees and hips. The researchers hope it is a step in the direction of a better understanding of why skin disorders occur. (2020-02-12)

Submerged aquatic vegetation return is sentinel of Chesapeake Bay ecosystem recovery
A new research article published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences analyzes the positive impact of long-term nutrient reductions on an important and valuable ecosystem in the Chesapeake Bay. Scientists indicate the resurgence of underwater grasses supports nutrient reductions from EPA's Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) along with conservation incentives have resulted in a healthier Chesapeake Bay. (2018-03-05)

Century of data shows sea-level rise shifting tides in Delaware, Chesapeake bays
The warming climate is expected to affect coastal regions worldwide as glaciers and ice sheets melt, raising sea level globally. For the first time, an international team has found evidence of how sea-level rise already is affecting high and low tides in both the Chesapeake and Delaware bays, two large estuaries of the eastern United States. (2018-01-24)

Cleaner air may be driving water quality in Chesapeake Bay
A new study suggests that improvements in air quality over the Potomac watershed, including the Washington, D.C., metro area, may be responsible for recent progress on water quality in the Chesapeake Bay. Scientists from the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science have linked improving water quality in streams and rivers of the Upper Potomac River Basin to reductions in nitrogen pollution onto the land and streams due to enforcement of the Clean Air Act. (2016-07-26)

How genes will save or fail birds in the face of climate change
A new study analyzing the genomes of yellow warblers in North America reveals how some subpopulations are more 'genetically vulnerable' to changes associated with climate change; furthermore, it finds that genes linked to exploratory and migratory behavior may be important for successful climate adaptation. (2018-01-04)

Scientists find that rain may not always be a welcome thing to waterbirds
Scientists from the Smithsonian and colleagues have found that waterbird communities can be the (2012-06-07)

Simple classification can help define and predict limb-threatening diabetic infections
Research groups from Texas, Chicago, Washington State and the Netherlands partnered to publish a landmark study validating the Infectious Disease Society of America's guidelines for the clinical classification of diabetic foot infections. (2007-01-30)

VIMS study identifies tipping point for oyster restoration
Study shows that reefs built to reach a foot or more above the bottom develop into healthy, self-sustaining ecosystems, while those rebuilt at lower heights are quickly buried by sediment. (2017-11-13)

Twenty-five years of satellite data confirm rising sea levels
Satellite data predicts current acceleration rate will cause a dramatic rise in sea level by 2100. (2018-02-12)

New 'king' of fossils discovered in Australia
Fossils of a giant new species from the long-extinct group of sea creatures called trilobites have been found on Kangaroo Island, South Australia. (2019-06-13)

Alaska's Columbia Glacier continues on disintegration course
Alaska's rapidly disintegrating Columbia Glacier, which has shrunk in length by 9 miles since 1980, has reached the mid-point of its projected retreat, according to a new University of Colorado at Boulder study. (2005-12-07)

Timing of migration is changing for songbirds on the Pacific coast
Changes in the timing of birds' migration can have serious negative effects if, for example, they throw the birds out of sync with the food resources they depend on. A new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications uses a long-term dataset from the Pacific coast and shows that the timing of bird migration in the region has shifted by more than two days in both spring and fall over the past two decades. (2017-12-06)

Monterey Bay Aquarium study finds sea turtles use flippers to manipulate food
Sea turtles use their flippers to handle prey despite the limbs being evolutionarily designed for locomotion, a discovery by Monterey Bay Aquarium researchers published in PeerJ. Research by Jessica Fujii and Dr. Kyle Van Houtan and others reveals a behavior thought to be less likely in marine tetrapods is actually widespread and that this type of exaptation of flippers may have been occurring 70 million years earlier than previously thought. (2018-03-28)

New study reveals cost of 2017 salmon fisheries closure
Last year's closure of the commercial ocean salmon troll fishery off the West Coast is estimated to have cost $5.8 million to $8.9 million in lost income for fishermen, with the loss of 200 to 330 jobs, according to a new model that determines the cost of fisheries closures based on the choices fishermen make. (2018-04-03)

Better understanding post-earthquake fault movement
Preparation and good timing enabled Gareth Funning and a team of researchers to collect a unique data set following the 2014 South Napa earthquake that showed different parts of the fault, sometimes only a few kilometers apart, moved at different speeds and at different times. (2016-07-18)

Ocean circulation likely to blame for severity of 2018 red tide
2018 was the worst year for red tide in more than a decade. A new study reveals what made it so severe. (2019-04-18)

Giant larvaceans transfer ocean pollution by ingesting plastic waste
Pinkie-sized plankton called giant larvaceans can ingest tiny pieces of plastic and pass them in their fecal pellets, which then sink to the bottom of the ocean. (2017-08-16)

NASA analyzes short-lived Bay of Bengal cyclone
NASA analyzed the rainfall generated by short-lived Tropical Cyclone 04B that formed and faded over a day in the Bay of Bengal. (2017-12-12)

Underwater surveys in Emerald Bay reveal the nature and activity of Lake Tahoe faults
Emerald Bay, California, a beautiful location on the southwestern shore of Lake Tahoe, is surrounded by rugged landscape, including rocky cliffs and remnants of mountain glaciers. Scenic as it may be, the area is also a complex structural puzzle. Understanding the history of fault movement in the Lake Tahoe basin is important to assessing earthquake hazards for regional policy planners. (2019-03-19)

Dissolved organic matter in the water column may influence coral health
Bacterial communities endemic to healthy corals could change depending on the amount and type of natural and man-made dissolved organic matter in seawater, report researchers from the University of Texas at Austin Marine Science Institute and Mote Marine Laboratory in Sarasota, Fla. (2008-03-04)

New genetic test detects manatees' recent presence in fresh or saltwater
US Geological Survey scientists have developed the first laboratory test that picks up traces of manatees' genetic material in waterways. The environmental DNA test shows whether one or more of the elusive marine mammals has been in the area in the past month. (2018-03-19)

Four kinds of algal toxins found in San Francisco Bay shellfish
Researchers monitoring San Francisco Bay for algal toxins have found a surprising array of different toxins in the water and in mussels collected from the bay. Four different classes of toxins, including one produced in freshwater environments, occur regularly throughout the bay, according to a study led by UC Santa Cruz researchers. (2018-03-12)

Where river meets ocean
Oceanographer uncovers the relationship between size and productivity in one of the world's most complex ecosystems. (2018-07-09)

Re-assessing Alaska's energy frontier
The new USGS assessment estimates 8.7 billion barrels of oil and 25 trillion cubic feet of natural gas resources. (2017-12-22)

First successful wild whale shark health assessments performed
For the first time ever, scientists successfully performed health assessments, including collecting blood and biological samples, taking measurements and attaching satellite tracking tags, to a population of wild whale sharks -- the world's largest fish, classified as 'endangered' since 2016. The research advancement, which occurred in Indonesia's remote Cendrawasih Bay, has significant implications for unlocking the mysteries surrounding the overall health of whale sharks -- including the potential impacts of tourism on their health. (2017-08-17)

Unprecedented number of warm-water species moved northward during marine heatwave
A UC Davis study documents an unprecedented number of southern marine species moving northward into California and as far north as Oregon during the 2014-2016 marine heatwave. Of 67 rare, warm-water species sightings observed, 37 had never been documented so far north before. (2019-03-12)

Nutrients, Ground Water, And The Chesapeake Bay - A Link With Pfiesteria?
Scientists from the USGS and other agencies involved in Chesapeake Bay studies are working together to understand the delivery of nutrients from the land into the Bay and the relationship of nutrients to Pfiesteria-like organisms and ultimately fish health. (1997-09-26)

Sinking ground in San Francisco Bay will worsen flooding from rising sea levels
ASU-led research using radar imaging to measure elevations uncovers an important gap in planning for sea level rise in the San Francisco Bay Area. (2018-03-07)

Capturing the balance of nature
Researchers capture dynamic changes in marine life over twelve years. (2018-03-02)

Scientists uncover a centuries-old case of mistaken identity in the Chesapeake Bay
Scientists recently discovered that some jellyfish in the Bay are quite different from their ocean cousins. This led scientists from NOAA and the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History to declare them as two different species. (2017-10-13)

New research: Some gut bacteria may protect against intestinal infection
Scientists have for the first time found evidence that a microbe in the human gut is associated with protection from typhoid fever infection. If the research is borne out, it could offer an exciting new way to reduce intestinal infections. (2018-05-08)

To a fault: the bottom line on earthquakes
Although many people think that California (2008-04-22)

30% of the UK's natural gas could be replaced by hydrogen, cutting carbon emissions
Almost a third of the natural gas fuelling UK homes and businesses could be replaced by hydrogen, a carbon free fuel, without requiring any changes to the nation's boilers and ovens, a pioneering study by Swansea University researchers has shown. (2018-06-10)

The tragedy of the seagrass commons
Urgent action is required to stem the loss of the world's seagrass meadows to protect their associated fisheries. (2017-11-17)

Overfishing great sharks wiped out North Carolina bay scallop fishery
Fewer big sharks in the oceans led to the destruction of North Carolina's bay scallop fishery and inhibits the recovery of depressed scallop, oyster and clam populations along the US Atlantic Coast, according to an article in the March 30 issue of the journal Science. (2007-03-29)

'Scars' left by icebergs record West Antarctic ice retreat
Thousands of marks on the Antarctic seafloor, caused by icebergs which broke free from glaciers more than ten thousand years ago, show how part of the Antarctic Ice Sheet retreated rapidly at the end of the last ice age as it balanced precariously on sloping ground and became unstable. (2017-10-25)

Hermine becomes a hurricane in the Gulf of Mexico
Tropical Storm Hermine officially reached hurricane status on Thursday, Sept. 1, 2016 at 1:55 p.m. EDT. NOAA's GOES-East satellite captured a visible image of the hurricane at 3:15 p.m. EDT (1915 UTC). (2016-09-01)

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