Popular Beetles News and Current Events

Popular Beetles News and Current Events, Beetles News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 18 | 700 Results
New pathways for sustainable agriculture
Diversity beats monotony: a colourful patchwork of small, differently used plots can bring advantages to agriculture and nature. This is the result of a new study by the University of Würzburg. (2019-04-08)

Fussy eating prevents mongoose family feuds
Mongooses living in large groups develop 'specialist' diets so they don't have to fight over food, new research shows. (2018-03-14)

Crunch time for food security
Insects have been a valuable source of nutritional protein for centuries, as both food and feed. The challenge now is to broaden their appeal, safely and sustainably (2017-11-10)

UGR scientist developed 3-D scans of beetles for Blade Runner 2049
One of the main visual effects companies behind Blade Runner 2049, BUF, sought the collaboration of Javier Alba-Tercedor, a Professor of Zoology at the University of Granada, to obtain scans of different species of beetles used in the film's visual effects. (2018-02-27)

Digger wasps and their chemistry
Astonishing evolution: Because digger wasps switched prey, the chemical protective layer of their skin changed, too. (2017-11-03)

Warming climate shrinks British Columbia beetles
Some of B.C.'s beetles are shrinking as their habitats get warmer, according to new UBC research. The study provides evidence that climate change is affecting the size of organisms. (2018-01-30)

Australian fire beetle avoids the heat
The Australian jewel beetle Merimna atrata has several heat sensors. Originally it was thought that it uses them to detect forest fires as the insect lays its eggs in the wood of burned eucalyptus trees. Researchers at the University of Bonn were finally able to refute this hypothesis. Instead, the beetle appears to need its heat sensors for a different purpose: to not burn its feet on landing. The study has now been published in the journal PLOS ONE. (2018-02-15)

New research predicts which trees are at greatest risk of beetle invasion
This study shows that the composition of forests is more important than other factors when predicting where the destructive pest will strike next. (2018-04-16)

Insects take a bigger bite out of plants in a higher CO2 world
Atmospheric carbon dioxide levels are rising at an alarming rate, and new research indicates that soybean plant defenses go down as CO2 goes up. Elevated CO2 impairs a key component of the plant's defenses against leaf-eating insects, according to the report. (2008-03-24)

The first case of a Portuguese beetle living exclusively in groundwater
A diving beetle demonstrating various adaptations to the life underground, including depigmentation and evolutionary loss of eyes, was discovered in the cave Soprador do Carvalho, Portugal. This new to science species is the first known representative of the whole order of beetles to exclusively inhabit the underground waters of Portugal. The insect is described by the team of Dr Ignacio Ribera and Prof Ana Sofia P. S. Reboleira in the open-access journal ZooKeys. (2019-01-08)

Insect warning colors aid cancer and tropical disease drug discovery
Brightly colored beetles or butterfly larvae nibbling on a plant may signal the presence of chemical compounds active against cancer cell lines and tropical parasitic diseases, according to researchers at Smithsonian's Tropical Research Institute in Panama. Such clues could speed drug discovery and provide insight into the ecological relationships between tropical-forest plants and insects that feed on them. (2008-07-08)

Diversity as natural pesticide
Monoculture crops provide the nutrient levels insect pests crave, explains a study led by the University of California, Davis, in the journal Nature. Returning plant diversity to farmland could be a key step toward sustainable pest control. (2016-10-12)

Men may contribute to infertility through newly discovered part of sperm
The research identifies a new structure in human sperm that functions in the zygote and may provide new avenues for addressing male infertility and insights into early embryo developmental defects. (2018-06-07)

Study of fungi-insect relationships may lead to new evolutionary discoveries
Zombie ants are only one of the fungi-insect relationships studied by a team of Penn State biologists in a newly compiled database of insect fungi interactions. (2016-05-24)

New tool predicts risk of plant disease and infestation worldwide
Researchers in Mexico have developed a technique to predict the risk of disease or infestation in plants. By considering pest-host interactions and the geographical distribution of vulnerable plants, their new algorithms can provide maps of potential disease hotspots, helping governments to identify the risk for outbreaks, before they happen. (2017-10-30)

'Bisexual' beetles are simply inept, new study finds
New research shows that same-sex mating among male insects is more likely to be due to incompetence rather than sexual preference. More than 100 species of insects engage in same-sex mating behavior, and in some species the same-sex mating is more common than heterosexual mating. The research team studied the red flour beetle to find out why. (2018-05-10)

Light pollution a reason for insect decline
Climate change, pesticides and land use changes alone cannot fully explain the decline in insect populations in Germany. Scientists from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) have now discovered that regions that have experienced a sharp decline in flying insects also have high levels of light pollution. Many studies already suggest that artificial light at night has negative impacts on insects, and scientists should pay greater attention to this factor when exploring the causes of insect population declines in the future. (2018-06-19)

UM professor co-authors report on the use of biotechnology in forests
University of Montana Professor Diana Six is one of 12 authors of a new report that addresses the potential for biotechnology to provide solutions for protecting forest trees from insect and pathogen outbreaks, which are increasing because of climate change and expanded global trade. (2019-01-15)

Bumblebees confused by iridescent colors
A new study published today by the University of Bristol shows for the first time that dazzling iridescent colors in animals can act as camouflage. (2018-05-25)

Two tiny beetle fossils offer evolution and biogeography clues
Recently, an international team led by Dr. CAI Chenyang, from the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, reported two new and rare species of the extant family Clambidae from Burmese amber: Acalyptomerus thayerae Cai and Lawrence, 2019, and Sphaerothorax uenoi Cai and Lawrence, 2019. They are important for understanding the early evolution and biogeography of the family and even for polyphagan beetles. (2019-01-17)

Urban biodiversity: Remarkable diversity of small animals in Basel gardens
Gardens in urban areas can harbor a remarkable diversity of species. This has been found by researchers from the University of Basel in a field study carried out with the support of private garden owners from the Basel region. Furthermore, the research team shows that nature-friendly garden management and design can largely compensate for the negative effects of urbanization on biodiversity. The study will be presented at the public conference 'Nature conservation in and around Basel' on Feb. 1, 2019. (2019-01-30)

How to manage forest pests in the Anthropocene? Bring theory.
A survivor's guide to why forests around the world are being impacted by invasive pests and what can be done about it in an era of overwhelming human activity and climate change. (2017-11-13)

Physical disability boosts parenting effort, beetles study shows
Animals that carry a physical impediment can work harder to rear their young as a result, an insect study has shown. They may behave this way in case they are not able to reproduce again, scientists suggest. (2018-03-22)

Why some beetles like alcohol
Alcohol used as a 'weed killer' optimizes the harvest of ambrosia beetles. (2018-04-09)

Three-way dance between herbivores, plants and microbes unveiled
What looks like a caterpillar chewing on a leaf or a beetle consuming fruit is likely a three-way battle that benefits most, if not all of the players involved, according to a Penn State entomologist. (2017-02-18)

How poppy flowers get those vibrant colours that entice insects
With bright reds and yellows -- and even the occasional white -- poppies are very bright and colorful. Their petals, however, are also very thin; they are made up of just three layers of cells. University of Groningen scientists Casper van der Kooi and Doekele Stavenga used microscopy and mathematical models describing how light interacts with petals to find out how the vibrant colors are created. (2019-02-08)

New pheromone insight may help predict mountain pine beetle outbreaks
Researchers at the University of British Columbia have shed new light on how mountain pine beetles produce an important pheromone called trans-verbenol, which could aid in efforts to better predict outbreaks. (2018-03-19)

What's for dinner? Sushi, with a side of crickets
While insects have been consumed for centuries worldwide, many people still haven't warmed to the idea of a creepy-crawly on the tongue. (2019-03-11)

Trophy hunting may cause extinction in a changing environment
Trophy hunting and other activities involving the targeting of high-quality male animals could lead to the extinction of certain species faced with changing environmental conditions, according to new research from Queen Mary University of London. (2017-11-28)

It takes 2 to tango: Beetles are equal partners in mating behavior
Beetles that copulate with the same mate as opposed to different partners will repeat the same behavior, debunking previous suggestions that one sex exerts control over the other in copulation, new research has found. (2017-02-21)

Citizen scientists discover 6 new species of beetles in Borneo
As part of a tropical biodiversity field course for citizen scientists initiated by the new organisation called 'Taxon Expeditions', a group of citizen scientists have discovered six new species of beetles in Borneo. The first three of these are published today in the open access Biodiversity Data Journal. (2017-12-06)

3-D scanning methods allow an inside look into fossilized feces
Coprolites are fossilized feces that give evidence of an organism's behavior and often contain food residues, parasite remains and other fossils that provide clues to ancient paleoecological relations. (2017-08-24)

Montana State researchers find that beetle odor could help tackle tamarisk
The Montana State University team found that a synthetic version of a pheromone produced by northern tamarisk beetles could be used to double the effectiveness of the beetles in controlling the invasive shrub. (2018-03-27)

DNA traces on wild flowers reveal insect visitors
Researchers have discovered that insects leave tiny DNA traces on the flowers they visit. This newly developed eDNA method holds a vast potential for documenting unknown insect-plant interactions, keeping track of endangered pollinators, such as wild bees and butterflies, as well as in the management of unwanted pest species. (2019-02-08)

Climate change damaging male fertility
Climate change could pose a threat to male fertility -- according to new research from the University of East Anglia. New findings published today in the journal Nature Communications reveal that heatwaves damage sperm in insects - with negative impacts for fertility across generations. The research team say that male infertility during heatwaves could help to explain why climate change is having such an impact on species populations, including climate-related extinctions in recent years. (2018-11-13)

New buzz around insect DNA analysis and biodiversity estimates
Researchers on the remote forested island of Hauturu, New Zealand have compiled a staggering inventory of invertebrate biodiversity using DNA sequencing, adding a significant number of invertebrates to GenBank - an open access database of all publicly available DNA sequences. The results are published this week in the Ecological Society of America's journal Ecological Applications. (2019-02-27)

Cool weather can amplify attacks of tree-killing bark beetle
New research looks at how the destructive southern pine beetle reacts to cooler weather in its climate-induced, new northern ranges. (2018-05-31)

Tiger Beetles Go Blind At High Speeds
Entomologists have long noticed that tiger beetles stop-and- go in their pursuit of prey. But up to now, scientists have had no idea why this species of beetle attacks its food in fits and starts. Why do they stop and go? During hot pursuit of prey, the tiger beetles go blind. (1998-01-16)

Microbial resident enables beetles to feed on a leafy diet
Thistle tortoise beetles outsource the job of breaking down plant cell walls to a symbiotic bacterium. The genome of this bacterium is the smallest ever sequenced of any organism living outside a host cell. It contains genes that are responsible for the production of pectinases, enzymes that break down pectin. The production of pectinases is the primary function of these bacteria. Without bacterial symbionts the beetles would be unable to survive. (2017-11-16)

Insects could help us find new yeasts for big business
Yeasts are tiny fungi -- but they play key roles in producing everything from beer and cheese to industrial chemicals and biofuels. And now scientists are proposing a new approach that could help these industries find new yeasts for use in their manufacturing processes. (2018-03-21)

Page 1 of 18 | 700 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.