Popular Behaviors News and Current Events

Popular Behaviors News and Current Events, Behaviors News Articles.
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Beyond romance
Love can make us do crazy things. It often prompts us to behave in counterintuitive ways, like, for example, placing the wellbeing of our loved ones above our own. But why? (2019-02-11)

Study finds COVID risk communication targeting younger adults may have biggest impact
A study of adults in the United States finds that - broadly speaking - the older you are, the more concerned you are about COVID-19, and the more steps you take to reduce your risk from COVID-19. The study suggests that the biggest boost in risk reduction would stem from communication efforts aimed at raising awareness of COVID-19 risks among U.S. adults under the age of 40. (2021-02-23)

Parents' physical activity associated with preschooler activity in underserved populations
Preschool-age children from low-income families are more likely to be physically active if parents increase activity and reduce sedentary behavior while wearing movement monitors (accelerometers), according to a Vanderbilt study published today in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. (2017-01-09)

Study clusters health behavior groups to broaden public health interventions
A new study led by a University of Kansas researcher has used national health statistics and identified how to cluster seven health behavior groups based on smoking status, alcohol use, physical activity, physician visits and flu vaccination are associated with mortality. (2017-03-15)

Zebrafish study provides new insights into autism spectrum disorder research
Exposure to a compound used to treat migraines and seizures causes characteristics associated with autism, groundbreaking research with zebrafish has demonstrated. (2018-01-24)

New tool to identify and control neurons
One of the big challenges in the Neuroscience field is to understand how connections and communications trigger our behavior. Researchers at Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience developed a tool to identify and control neurons. The new technique, called Calcium and Light-Induced Gene Handling Toolkit or 'Cal-Light,' allows researchers to observe and manipulate the neural activities underlying behavior with never-before-seen specificity, hopefully allowing researchers to identify causality between neuronal activity and behavior. (2017-06-26)

Love actually: Americans agree on what makes people 'feel the love'
Americans may disagree on many things, but love might not be one of them. According to researchers, people in the US largely agree about what makes them feel loved, coming to a general consensus that it may be small gestures that matter most. (2017-11-06)

The importance of children at play
Research highlights positive strengths in developmental learning for Latino children in low-income households based on their interactive play skills. (2016-01-20)

Teens exposed to drug use, mental distress, violence at risk for HIV in adulthood
The psychological and social risks that adolescents experience can have a lasting impact on adulthood. (2017-12-21)

Do children inherently want to help others?
A new special section of the journal Child Development includes a collection of ten empirical articles and one theoretical article focusing on the predictors, outcomes, and mechanisms related to children's motivations for prosocial actions, such as helping and sharing. (2016-11-22)

Mental health issues linked to risky driving in newly licensed teens
Mental health symptoms related to attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and conduct disorder are associated with increased errors in a driving simulator and self-reported risky driving behaviors in adolescents, according to study in Nursing Research, published by Wolters Kluwer. (2018-03-27)

Physiological markers for cutting, other self-harming behaviors by teenage girls found
Non-fatal, self-inflicted injuries by adolescent and young adult females have become major public health problems and researchers have found physiological evidence that this behavior may lead to a more serious psychological condition called borderline personality disorder. (2006-06-16)

Brain DNA 'remodeled' in alcoholism
Reshaping of the DNA scaffolding that supports and controls the expression of genes in the brain may play a major role in alcohol withdrawal symptoms, particularly anxiety, that makes it so difficult to stop using alcohol by alcoholics, researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine and the Jesse Brown VA Medical Center report in a study in the April 2 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience. (2008-04-01)

Linking teen driving behaviors to ADHD, other mental health factors
Teen drivers are three times more likely to get into a fatal crash than their more-experienced, older counterparts. Research led by Catherine McDonald and Thomas Power of the University of Pennsylvania, found a link between mistakes these new drivers make and self-reported ADHD and other inattention disorders. (2018-03-30)

Valuing gluten-free foods relates to health behaviors in young adults
In a new study featured in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, researchers found that among young adults valuing gluten-free foods could be indicative of an overall interest in health or nutrition. These young adults were more likely to engage in healthier behaviors including better dietary intake and also valued food production practices (e.g., organic, non-GMO, locally sourced). Of concern, they were also more likely to engage in unhealthy weight control behaviors and over-concern about weight. (2018-06-18)

Mindful yoga can reduce risky behaviors in troubled youth, says UC research
Study shows a marked reduction in risky sex and substance abuse in troubled 18- to 24-year-olds after several months of participating in mindful yoga and positive coping strategies. (2017-12-07)

New study demonstrates importance of studying sleep and eating in tandem
A new study offers important insights into possible links between sleep and hunger. (2017-10-13)

People could be genetically predisposed to social media use
Chance York (Kent State University) used a behavior genetics framework and twin study data from the 2013 Midlife in the United States survey, York examined how both environmental and genetic factors contribute to social media use by applying an analytical model called Defries-Fulker Regression. (2017-05-02)

Study points to potential misuse/abuse of ADHD drugs
A new British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology study indicates that methylphenidate, a central nervous system stimulant approved to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy, may be subject to misuse and/or abuse. (2018-03-07)

Study finds a dearth of mental health interventions for ethnic minority youth in the US
A research team from Arizona State University, DePaul University and the University of Southern California analyzed how effective evidence-based mental health intervention programs were for ethnic minority youth in the United States. Four treatment programs met the criteria of 'well-established.' These treatments addressed substance abuse, disruptive behavior and anxiety in Hispanic/Latino and African-American youth. Native-American and Asian-American youth were underrepresented or absent from research studies on mental health intervention programs. (2019-02-08)

Feeling sated can become a cue to eat more
When hunger pangs strike, we usually interpret them as a cue to reach for a snack; when we start to feel full, we take it as a sign that we should stop eating. But new research shows that these associations can be learned the other way around, such that satiety becomes a cue to eat more, not less. The findings suggest that internal, physical states themselves can serve as contexts that cue specific learned behaviors. (2017-10-02)

High-efficiency building bloopers revealed through WSU led occupant studies
Many researchers know that new high-efficiency buildings don't typically get used as intended. The numbers don't add up, and occupants can easily waste energy if they do not understand how to use the building. Julia Day, assistant professor in Washington State University's School of Design and Construction, set out to learn why. (2017-11-13)

Bullying bosses negatively impact employee performance and behavior
Employees bullied by their bosses are more likely to report unfairness and work stress, and consequently become less committed to their jobs or even retaliate, according to a Portland State University study. (2019-03-07)

Video tags reveal surprising details of blue whale feeding behavior
The lunge feeding of blue whales is an extraordinary biomechanical event in which the largest animal on Earth accelerates and opens its mouth under water, expanding its enormous throat pouch to engulf a huge volume of water, then filtering out its prey. A new study of blue whale feeding strategies reveals surprising preferences with respect to how much and which direction they roll during lunge feeding in order to maximize efficiency. (2017-11-20)

Is risk-taking behavior contagious?
Why do we sometimes decide to take risks and other times choose to play it safe? In a new study, Caltech researchers explored the neural mechanisms of one possible explanation: a contagion effect. (2016-04-14)

Study: One-third of young adults have ridden with an impaired driver
A new study led by a Colorado State University researcher indicates that riding with an impaired driver is prevalent among emerging adults, with 33 percent of recent high school grads reporting the risky behavior at least once in the previous year. (2018-03-19)

Bullying gets worse as children with autism get older
Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are more likely to experience bullying than children without ASD and this bullying gets worse with age, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2019-06-12)

Sleep health and yoga intervention delivered in low-income communities improves sleep
Pilot study results indicate that a sleep and yoga intervention has promising effects on improving sleep disturbance, sleep-related impairment, and sleep health behaviors. (2018-06-05)

Millennials are not adequately saving for retirement, MU study finds
In a new study, researchers from the University of Missouri found that only 37.2 percent of working millennials have retirement accounts, demonstrating a need for increased financial education for retirement. This study is among the first to examine the state of millennials' retirement savings. (2018-03-05)

A mom's support helps a child learn to handle negative emotions, but what if mom is distressed?
When children become upset, showing negative emotions or behaviors, some parents become distressed, while others are able to talk their child through the difficult situation. Studies have shown that a mothers' reaction -- positive or negative -- to her child's negative emotions can predict whether her child develops the ability to effectively regulate his emotions and behavior. A new University of Illinois study explores potential predictors of mothers' supportive or non-supportive behavior during emotional challenges. (2017-11-17)

School climate and diversity may affect students' delinquent behaviors
In a Journal of School Health study, race, sex, perceived peer inclusion, and teacher discrimination were predictors of students' delinquent behaviors. (2018-01-16)

Civic engagement can help teens thrive later in life
Want to help your teenagers become successful adults? Get them involved in civic activities - voting, volunteering and activism. (2018-01-23)

Is it ok for parents to be supportive to children's negative emotions?
New research suggests that whereas mothers who are more supportive of their children's negative emotions rate their children as being more socially skilled, these same children appear less socially adjusted when rated by teachers. (2017-06-16)

Sitting and physical inactivity may increase risk of urinary tract symptoms
Prolonged sitting time and low physical activity levels were linked with the development of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in a BJU International study of 69,795 middle-aged Korean men. (2018-03-21)

Supervisors, coworkers tolerate unethical behavior when production is good, Baylor study
A new Baylor University study published in the journal Personnel Psychology investigates why employees' unethical behaviors may be tolerated versus rejected. Researchers ask: when and why are people ostracized at work? (2016-04-06)

Parenting behaviors linked to suicide among adolescents
A fresh look at a federally sponsored 2012 national study shows a significant link between parent's behaviors and thoughts of suicide among adolescents, according to a presentation given by two University of Cincinnati professors at the 2017 American Public Health Association conference. (2017-12-05)

Fear and hoping: Adding hope to health messages may motivate better behaviors
While fear about health concerns may grip people, adding a little hope to a message might make people more willing to take preventative actions, according to researchers. (2018-02-23)

Research shows that busy people make healthier choices
A busy mindset can be leveraged to promote better self-control. (2018-09-18)

Program for parents improves ADHD behaviors in young children
Effective early intervention is crucial for young children with ADHD, due to the unfavorable short-term and long-term outcomes associated with the disorder. (2017-10-03)

Consequences-focused cognitive training may promote healthier habits
Interventions aimed at reducing unhealthy behaviors often focus on retraining people's mental associations, but a series of studies suggests that showing people the consequences of the behaviors may be more effective. The findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. (2018-10-29)

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