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Popular Behaviors News and Current Events, Behaviors News Articles.
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Consequences-focused cognitive training may promote healthier habits
Interventions aimed at reducing unhealthy behaviors often focus on retraining people's mental associations, but a series of studies suggests that showing people the consequences of the behaviors may be more effective. The findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. (2018-10-29)

Program for parents improves ADHD behaviors in young children
Effective early intervention is crucial for young children with ADHD, due to the unfavorable short-term and long-term outcomes associated with the disorder. (2017-10-03)

A neighborhood's quality influences children's behaviors through teens, study suggests
The quality of the neighborhood where a child grows up has a significant impact on the number of problem behaviors they display during elementary and teenage years, a study led by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers suggests.  (2017-11-09)

The neurons the power parenting
Harvard researchers have described, for the first time, how separate pools of neurons control individual aspects of parenting behavior in mice. (2018-04-12)

Autism therapy: Social behavior restored via brain stimulation
Scientists are examining the feasibility of treating autistic children with neuromodulation after a new study showed social impairments can be corrected by brain stimulation. (2017-12-13)

The mouse brain can prioritize hunger by suppressing pain when survival is at stake
Different behaviors are often studied in isolation, leaving unanswered questions about how the brain processes needs and prioritizes behaviors to ensure survival. Now, researchers have shown that pain and hunger interact in complex ways in mice: extreme hunger suppresses less-urgent inflammatory pain, but leaves them able to feel and react to more life-and-death kinds of pain. The study, published March 22 in Cell, pinpoints a highly specific neural circuit that creates this analgesic effect. (2018-03-22)

IUPUI study links juveniles' views of police with likelihood of aggressive behavior
A new Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis study of juvenile offenders finds that when youth perceive police injustice, it affects not only how they view the justice system, but also their rates of aggression. (2017-09-21)

Tracing trends could lead to better public health education
The educated members of a population are the trailblazers of risky behavior, but they are quicker to change their habits once the consequences of that behavior become better understood, according to new research from Penn State, which could also have implications on how public health education is approached. (2017-09-18)

Researchers discover clues to brain differences between males and females
Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine have discovered a mechanism for how androgens -- male sex steroids -- sculpt brain development. The research, conducted by Margaret M. McCarthy, Ph.D., who Chairs the Department of Pharmacology, could ultimately help researchers understand behavioral development differences between males and females. (2019-03-01)

For racial minority adolescents, cigarette and alcohol use linked to suicidality
Examining more than 20 years of national data for US adolescents, a research team led by Andrew Subica at the University of California, Riverside reports that adolescents have high prevalence of alcohol, cigarette, and marijuana use, and concerning rates of suicide-related thoughts and behaviors. The data show that among U.S. adolescents in ninth to 12th grades, 75 percent had used alcohol, 58 percent had used cigarettes, and 41 percent tried marijuana. (2018-04-13)

Sexual orientation discordance puts adolescents at greater risk for nonfatal suicidal behaviors
Researchers have now identified sexual orientation discordance -- sexual contact that is inconsistent with the individual's sexual orientation -- as a potential risk factor for adolescent suicidal ideation and/or attempts. They found that discordant students were 70 percent more likely to have had suicidal ideas or to have made suicide attempts compared with concordant students, reports the American Journal of Preventive Medicine. (2018-02-20)

Surgical menopause leads to increased sleep issues
Insomnia is one of the most common symptoms of menopause, with nearly 20 percent of postmenopausal women reporting sleep disturbances. A new study from Korea demonstrates that sleep quality is often worse for women who undergo surgical menopause compared with those who transition through menopause naturally. The study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS). (2018-11-14)

New study looks at LGBT allies in college sports
The sports world has not always been considered inviting for those who identify as gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender. Yet, college athletes can make powerful allies for the LGBT community, given their visibility and status on campus, says University of Arizona researcher Russell Toomey. He and his collaborators developed a scale to measure college athletes' engagement in LGBT ally behaviors, and they hope college athletic departments nationwide can use the tool. (2017-01-30)

Parental warning: second-hand smoke may trigger nicotine dependence symptoms in kids
Parents who smoke cigarettes around their kids in cars and homes beware -- second-hand smoke may trigger symptoms of nicotine dependence in children. The findings are published in the September edition of the journal Addictive Behaviors in a joint study from nine Canadian institutions. (2008-09-29)

How a yeast cell helps crack open the 'black box' behind artificial intelligence
UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers developed a visible neural network and used it to build DCell, a virtual model of a functioning brewer's yeast cell. To do this, they amassed all knowledge of cell biology in one place and created a hierarchy of these cellular components. Then they mapped standard machine learning algorithms to this knowledgebase. DCell can be viewed at d-cell.ucsd.edu. The technical details are published March 5 in Nature Methods. (2018-03-05)

Two behaviors linked to high school dropout rates
The factors that may lead to a student's decision to leave school are complex, but a new study from the University of Georgia sheds light on how two behaviors -- aggression and weak study skills -- contribute to the problem. (2018-03-12)

New study shows sitting, watching TV linked to colorectal cancer risk before age 50
A new study in JNCI Cancer Spectrum has identified a connection between prolonged time spent sitting while watching TV and increased risk of colorectal cancer for younger Americans. (2019-02-05)

Human activity quickly killing cultural diversity of the chimpanzee
The impact human activities have on the cultural behaviors and traditions of our closest relative, the chimpanzee, is drastic, reports a new study -- one based on an unprecedented data set of nearly 150 African chimpanzee communities. (2019-03-07)

Ketamine reverses neural changes underlying depression-related behaviors in mice
Researchers have identified ketamine-induced brain-related changes that are responsible for maintaining the remission of behaviors related to depression in mice. Ketamine treatment restored lost dendritic spines and rescued coordinated neural activity in the Prefrontal Cortex of the mice -- findings that may help researchers develop interventions that promote lasting remission of depression in humans. The study was funded by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), part of the National Institutes of Health. (2019-04-11)

Low health literacy associated with early death for cardiovascular patients
Patients hospitalized with a cardiovascular event are more likely to die within one year if they have low health literacy, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center study released today in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. (2018-11-07)

Great expectations force risky business acquisitions
A good reputation can be bad for business, according to new research from the University of Georgia. (2017-05-16)

Smoking, lack of exercise linked to early death after divorce
A growing body of research links divorce to a wide range of poor health outcomes, including greater risk for early death. A new University of Arizona study points to two possible culprits: a greater likelihood of smoking after divorce and lower levels of physical activity. (2018-05-29)

Poor neighborhoods' influence on parents may raise preschool children's risk of problems
New research that examined the influence of poor neighborhoods on parents has linked parental factors to increased risk of verbal and behavioral problems in children. Living in poor neighborhoods was associated with poorer mental health in parents, poorer family relations, and less consistent and more punitive parenting. The study also found less neighborhood cohesion or mutual trust in poor neighborhoods, which were often associated in turn with parenting styles related to behavior problems in children. (2008-02-07)

Bullying likely to result in aggressive responses by children with disabilities
A new study from the University of Missouri has found that children with disabilities are more likely to respond aggressively when they are bullied, not only to their bullies but to other children as well. This aggressive response often results in these children being labelled as bullies themselves, when that is not an accurate assessment of their behavior. (2016-10-03)

Realistic rodent model of drug addiction
Drug addiction may not require a habitual relationship with a substance, suggests findings from a new model of cocaine administration in rats that better captures the human experience of obtaining and using drugs. The research, published in JNeurosci, represents a step towards a translational animal model of addiction that challenges widely held views about drug users. (2017-11-20)

Civic engagement in adolescence and young adulthood beneficial for adult development
A new study sought to determine whether civic engagement during adolescence and young adulthood promotes better health, education, and income over the course of adulthood. The study found a pattern of positive associations of voting and volunteering with these important aspects of adult development, but a mix of positive and negative outcomes in adulthood for activism as a form of civic engagement. (2018-01-23)

Educational success curbs effects of child abuse, neglect
The emotional and sexual abuse that some children endure can lead them to commit crimes later in life. (2018-03-14)

New micro-platform reveals cancer cells' natural behavior
A new cell culture platform allows researchers to observe never-before-seen behaviors of live cancer cells under the microscope, leading to explanations of long-known cancer characteristics. (2018-09-19)

Analyzing picture books for nutrition education
Feeding children can be a challenging process for many parents. A previous study found 46 percent of preschoolers were picky eaters and 40 percent of picky eaters remained picky for two or more years. Nutrition education and recommended feeding practices may help parents deal with feeding problems and shorten their duration. Books may be used as resources to help teach children to overcome poor eating habits. Thus, a content analysis was conducted to assess messages about dietary behaviors and feeding strategies in a set of picture books. (2016-10-06)

Brain protein mutation from child with autism causes autism-like behavioral change in mice
A de novo gene mutation that encodes a brain protein in a child with autism has been placed into the brains of mice. These mice then showed severe alterations of specific behaviors that closely resemble those seen in human autism spectrum disorder, or ASD. (2019-07-23)

Financial therapy can aid well-being, stability
Financial therapy could help couples navigate disagreements, money concerns and financial conflicts before these issues tear relationships apart. (2019-11-21)

Researchers gain insight into infant handling by young bonobos
University of Oregon anthropologist Klaree Boose followed her intuition about her observations of bonobos at a US zoo. She now theorizes that young females of the endangered ape species prepare for motherhood and form social bonds by helping mothers take care of infants. (2018-06-19)

Rutgers researchers highlight need for more smoking cessation programs in state prisons
Inmates want to quit smoking but don't have access to smoking cessation programs in state prisons, increasing the risk - especially among black male inmates -- of cancer, heart disease, stroke and other smoking-related diseases, according to Rutgers researchers. (2019-01-28)

Mother-daughter conflict, low serotonin level may be deadly combination
The combination of negative mother-daughter relationships and low blood levels of serotonin, an important brain chemical for mood stability, may be lethal for adolescent girls, leaving them vulnerable to engage in self-harming behaviors such as cutting themselves. (2008-03-05)

About half of parents use cell phones while driving with young children in the car
A new study from a team of researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing found that in the previous three months, about half of parents talked on a cell phone while driving when their children between the ages of 4 and 10 were in the car, while one in three read text messages and one in seven used social media. (2018-07-12)

Timing of spring birdsong provides climate insights
Climate change has scientists worried that birds' annual migration and reproduction will be thrown out of sync with the seasons. Because birds' songs are correlated with their breeding behavior and are easily identifiable to species, monitoring birdsong can be a good way to keep tabs on this possibility, and a new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications takes advantage of this approach to provide new baseline data for the birds of northern California. (2018-01-17)

One way social isolation changes the mouse brain
Social isolation is an intensely stressful environment for mice. When animals are stressed, they generally become much more reactive to a variety of negative stimulants, and these reactions or behaviors persist longer than in non-stressed animals. In a paper published May 17 in the journal Cell, scientists present what they believe is one of the mechanisms by which chronic social isolation in mice causes the brain to change in a profound way. (2018-05-17)

Study: Teens who help strangers have more confidence
A new study from BYU's School of Family Life found that adolescents who exhibited prosocial behavior toward strangers had higher self-esteem a year later. The same was not true for prosocial behavior solely to friends and family. (2017-12-18)

Systemic racism needs more examination related to health, says UofL researcher
Although the discipline of public health has recently recognized racism as a social determinant of health, little research examines the issue related to systems and structures. (2018-06-07)

Why do employees cheat? Too much pressure
When employees feel their job depends on meeting high benchmarks, some fudge results in order to stay employed, according to a new study. (2017-11-16)

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