Popular Behaviour News and Current Events

Popular Behaviour News and Current Events, Behaviour News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Weyl goes chiral
Quasiparticles that behave like massless fermions, known as Weyl fermions, have been in recent years at the center of a string of exciting findings in condensed matter physics. The group of physicist Sebastian Huber at ETH Zurich now reports experiments in which they got a handle on one of the defining properties of Weyl fermions -- their chirality. (2019-02-11)

Choosy amphipods
Amphipods of the species Gammarus roeselii guard their chosen mates, often carrying them with them for days and defending them against potential rivals. This behavior requires a lot of time and energy, so that the males make their choice with care. Scientists at Goethe University have now investigated under which circumstances males are prepared to revise their decision. (2019-02-07)

Nature hits rewind
The study of evolution is revealing new complexities, showing how the traits most beneficial to the fitness of individual plants and animals are not always the ones we see in nature. Instead, new research by McMaster behavioural scientists shows that in certain cases evolution works in the opposite direction, reversing individual improvements to benefit related members of the same group. (2019-03-19)

Map of teenage brain provides evidence of link between antisocial behavior and brain development
The brains of teenagers with serious antisocial behavior problems differ significantly in structure to those of their peers, providing the clearest evidence to date that their behavior stems from changes in brain development in early life, according to new research led by the University of Cambridge and the University of Southampton, in collaboration with the University of Rome Tor Vergata in Italy. (2016-06-15)

Enzyme may get key role in drug design for breast cancer and brain condition
In recent years, researchers have focused on the enzyme TLK2 suspecting it of playing a main role in several diseases. A new study conducted at the University of Copenhagen now reveals that the enzyme displays lower levels of activity in intellectual disability and that it is possible to inhibit it in breast cancer, where it is overactive. The study thus suggests that the enzyme may be a target for potential therapies. (2018-06-29)

A novel test bed for non-equilibrium many-body physics
The behavior of electrons in a material is typically difficult to predict. Novel insight comes now from experiments and simulations performed by a team led by ETH physicists who have studied electronic transport properties in a one-dimensional quantum wire containing a mesoscopic lattice. (2018-03-30)

Can pollution alter wildlife behavior?
A team of scientists from the University of Portsmouth have developed new scientific tests to better understand the effects of pollution on wildlife behavior. (2018-07-27)

Sensory stimuli control dopamine in the brain
In their study of fish larvae, Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Driever and his team of neurobiologists at the University of Freiburg discovered that a group of nerve cells in the forebrain release the neurotransmitter dopamine when activated by tactile or certain visual stimuli. These dopaminergic nerve cells send connections to almost all parts of the brain and spinal cord. These new findings could play a role in future treatment of such illnesses as restless leg syndrome. (2017-01-13)

People with autism are less surprised by the unexpected
Adults with autism may overestimate the volatility of the world around them, finds a new UCL study published in Nature Neuroscience. (2017-07-31)

See and be seen
Physicists at the University of Konstanz were able to show that the formation of stable groups requires only few skills: forward visual perception over large distances and regulation of the speed according to the number of perceived individuals. (2019-04-04)

Electron behavior under extreme conditions described for the first time
Researchers have modeled the actions of electrons under extreme temperatures and densities, such as those found within planets and stars. (2017-10-06)

Learning makes animals intelligent
The fact that animals can use tools, have self-control and certain expectations of life can be explained with the help of a new learning model for animal behavior. Researchers at Stockholm University and Brooklyn College have combined knowledge from the fields of artificial intelligence, ethology and the psychology of learning to solve several problems concerning the behavior and intelligence of animals. (2016-11-29)

Mindfulness may help reduce cravings for food and drugs, says review
Mindfulness strategies may help prevent or interrupt cravings for food and drugs, such as cigarettes and alcohol, by occupying short term memory, according to a new review from City, University of London. (2018-01-30)

Fussy eating prevents mongoose family feuds
Mongooses living in large groups develop 'specialist' diets so they don't have to fight over food, new research shows. (2018-03-14)

Sensory stimuli control dopamine in the brain
Type and intensity of stimuli control the activity of nerve cells that release the neurotransmitter dopamine. (2017-01-13)

Explaining autism
Recognizing a need to better understand the biology that produces Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) symptoms, scientists at Duke-NUS Medical School (Duke-NUS) and the National Neuroscience Institute (NNI), Singapore, have teamed up and identified a novel mechanism that potentially links abnormal brain development to the cause of ASDs. This new knowledge will help to improve the diagnosis and development of therapeutic interventions for ASDs. (2016-02-17)

One in 4 women at sexual health clinics reports coercion over their reproductive lives
As many as one in four women attending sexual and reproductive healthcare services say they are not allowed to take control of their own reproductive lives, reveals a review of the available evidence, published today in BMJ Sexual & Reproductive Health. (2019-01-07)

The fear of losing control and its role in anxiety disorders
Did you lock the front door? Did you double-check? Are you sure? If this sounds familiar, perhaps you can relate to people with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Help may be on the way. New Concordia research sheds light on how the fear of losing control over thoughts and actions impacts OCD-related behavior, including checking. (2017-12-13)

Kitchen hygiene in the spotlight: Do TV cooking shows influence our hygiene behavior?
TV shows dealing with all aspects of cooking are popular. They not only convey knowledge and tasty recipes, they also have a high entertainment value. A research project at the Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) shows, however, that kitchen hygiene often only plays a minor role on TV. (2018-02-02)

'Cold-blooded' pythons make for caring moms
The female Southern African python is the first ever egg-laying snake species shown to care for their babies. This comes at great cost to themselves, as they never eat during the breeding period -- with many snakes starving -- and turn their color to black in order to attract more sun while basking to raise their body temperature. (2018-03-14)

The absence of ants -- Entomologist confirms first Saharan farming 10,000 years ago
Dr Stefano Vanin was part of an international team working on discoveries at the Holocene age hunter-gatherer site at Takarkori in south-western Libya. (2018-03-16)

Heart cells sense stiffness by measuring contraction forces and resting tension simultaneously
Researchers from Queen Mary University of London have identified a new mechanism in which adhesive structures within the cells of the heart sense stiffness through muscle contractions and resting tension at the same time. (2018-01-25)

New offices make us more image-conscious
Employees subconsciously act and dress differently in modern open-plan office environments, according to a new study published in the journal Gender, Work and Organization. (2018-05-01)

Fear of 'killer shrimps' could pose major threat to European rivers
The fear of invasive 'killer shrimps' can intimidate native organisms to such a degree that they are incapable of performing their vital role in river systems, a new study suggests. (2019-06-04)

Hi-tech scans catch prehistoric mite hitching ride on spider
Scientists have produced amazing three-dimensional images of a prehistoric mite as it hitched a ride on the back of a 50 million-year-old spider. (2011-11-08)

Bonobos share and share alike
Bonobos are willing to share meat with animals outside their own family groups. This behavior was observed in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and is documented in a new study in Springer's journal Human Nature. (2018-04-05)

Smoking around your toddler could be just as bad as smoking while pregnant
Children whose parents smoked when they were toddlers are likely to have a wider waist and a higher BMI by time they reach ten years of age, reveal researchers at the University of Montreal and its affiliated CHU Sainte Justine Research Centre. (2015-06-21)

Blood vessels also affected by Alzheimer's disease
A research conducted by the UAB demonstrates that mice suffering from this disease also have substantial malfunctions in small blood vessels, important in nourishing different organs and tissues and in regulating blood pressure, and which mainly affects females. The study also demonstrates a correlation between the state of peripheral blood vessels and different levels of anxious behaviour, both in normal ageing and in those suffering from Alzheimer's disease. (2018-03-16)

Image conscious people are more likely to give to crowdfunding campaigns
People who are more image conscious tend to support more crowdfunding campaigns according to a new study. (2018-03-01)

Nanoparticles remain unpredictable
The way that nanoparticles behave in the environment is extremely complex. There is currently a lack of systematic experimental data to help understand them comprehensively, as ETH environmental scientists have shown in a large overview study. A more standardized approach would help to advance the research field. (2017-04-19)

Researchers to predict cognitive dissonance according to brain activity
A new study by HSE researchers has uncovered a new brain mechanism that generates cognitive dissonance -- a mental discomfort experienced by a person who simultaneously holds two or more contradictory beliefs or values, or experiences difficulties in making decisions. The results of the study have been published in the paper 'Open Access Neural Mechanisms of Cognitive Dissonance (Revised): an EEG Study' in The Journal of Neuroscience. (2017-05-16)

People's love of the seas could be the key for plastic pollution solution
Tapping into the public's passion for the ocean could be the key to reducing the threats to it posed by plastic pollution. (2017-09-18)

Cool lizards are better at learning socially
Bearded dragons which are incubated in colder environments are better at solving cognitive tasks as adults than incubated in warmer temperatures, according to new research published today. Scientists from the University of Lincoln, UK, tested the social learning abilities of bearded dragons which had been incubated in either an average of 30°C or 27°C and found that those from the colder incubation environment picked up new skills faster than their hotter counterparts. (2017-11-22)

The memory part of the brain may also hold clues for anxiety and depression
New research finds that the hippocampus may yield important clues for a range of mental health illnesses including addition, anxiety and depression. (2018-04-13)

New options for treating autism
The release of oxytocin leads to an increase in the production of anandamide, which causes mice to display a preference for interacting socially. This new mechanism by which oxytocin could be involved in social behaviour has been published recently in the prestigious scientific journal PNAS. Olga Peñagarikano, from the UPV/EHU, has participated in the piece of research. (2015-11-18)

Fish step up to lead when predators are near
Researchers from the University of Bristol have discovered that some fish within a shoal take on the responsibilities of leader when they are under threat from predators. (2017-05-03)

Genetic changes caused by environmental factors linked to suicide risk
Researchers have linked genetic changes in the so-called CRH gene, which affects the regulation of the body's stress system, to suicide risk and psychiatric illness. The study of epigenetic changes in the body's hormone-based stress system has shown that stress-related changes in the CRH gene are linked to both serious suicide attempts in adults and psychiatric illness in adolescents. (2018-01-02)

Parental behaviour affects the involvement of children in cyberbullying
The information analysed by this group of researchers came to another conclusion: when parenting practices are not very suitable, it seems that the probability increases that the children might be victimised or involved in the double role of aggressor/victim, while in the case of girls, when they are treated in this way, they tend to be cyber-aggressors. (2019-04-05)

The mysterious sexual life of the most primitive dragonfly
The dragonfly considered the most primitive in the world lives in Australia and Tasmania, and was believed to be extinct four decades ago. But it is far from being so. A Galician researcher has observed thousands of these insects in one of the few habitats in which it has been detected and it displays sexual behavior that is unique, not only directed towards reproduction. (2016-05-31)

Macho pursuits dominate assessments of risky behavior, reinforcing gender stereotypes
Women can be just as risky as men -- or even riskier -- when the conventional macho measures of daring -- such as betting vast sums on a football game -- are replaced by less stereotypical criteria, according to new research led by the University of Exeter. (2017-10-05)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.