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Popular Biodiversity News and Current Events

Popular Biodiversity News and Current Events, Biodiversity News Articles.
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Size is everything
The susceptibility of ecosystems to disruption depends on a lot of factors that can't all be grasped. (2019-05-20)
DNA barcoding technology helping monitor health of all-important boreal forests
The Boreal forest is essential to Canada and the world, storing carbon, purifying water and air and regulating climate. (2017-10-06)
Nearly 40% of species are very rare and are vulnerable to climate change
Almost 40 percent of global flora is categorized as 'exceedingly rare,' and these species are most at risk of extinction by human development and as the climate continues to change, according to new University of Arizona-led research. (2019-11-27)
Forest fragmentation disrupts parasite infection in Australian lizards
In a study with implications for biodiversity and the spread of infectious diseases, CU Boulder ecologists have demonstrated that deforestation and habitat fragmentation can decrease transmission of a parasitic nematode in a particular species of Australian lizard, the pale-flecked garden sunskink. (2018-11-29)
How to be a winner in the game of evolution
A new study by University of Arizona biologists helps explain why different groups of animals differ dramatically in their number of species, and how this is related to differences in their body forms and ways of life. (2017-01-13)
Fast evolution affects everyone, everywhere
Rapid evolution of other species happens all around us all the time -- and many of the most extreme examples are associated with human influences. (2016-12-05)
Mount Kilimanjaro: Ecosystems in global change
Land use in tropical mountain regions leads to considerable changes of biodiversity and ecological functions. (2019-03-27)
Poor outlook for biodiversity in Antarctica
The popular view that Antarctica and the Southern Ocean are in a much better environmental shape than the rest of the world has been brought into question in a study publishing on March 28 in the open access journal PLOS Biology, by an international team lead by Steven L. (2017-03-28)
Mammals and birds could have best shot at surviving climate change 
New research that analyzed more than 270 million years of data on animals shows that mammals and birds -- both warm-blooded animals -- may have a better chance of evolving and adapting to the Earth's rapidly changing climate than their cold-blooded peers, reptiles and amphibians. (2018-01-29)
Business in Key Biodiversity Areas: Minimizing the risk to nature
A roadmap for businesses operating in some of the most biologically significant places on the planet has been issued this week by the Key Biodiversity Area Partnership involving 12 of the world's leading conservation organizations -- including IUCN, International Union for Conservation of Nature. (2018-04-20)
From pollutants to human health: Key questions for a better environmental future in Europe
A new study, published in the journal Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, wants to shape a new guideline --with a more global and coordinated perspective-- for several social and economic sectors in the field of chemical products and management of environmental risks in Europe. (2018-07-20)
Targeted conservation could protect more of Earth's biodiversity
A new study finds that major gains in global biodiversity can be achieved if an additional 5 percent of land is set aside to protect key species. (2017-05-25)
Thought Antarctica's biodiversity was doing well? Think again
Antarctica and the Southern Ocean are not in better environmental shape than the rest of the world. (2017-04-25)
Wood pellets: Renewable, but not carbon neutral
A return to firewood is bad for forests and the climate. (2018-03-22)
Biodiversity is 3-D
The species-area relationship (SAC) is a long-time considered pattern in ecology and is discussed in most of academic Ecology books. (2017-06-09)
Unravelling the costs of rubber agriculture on biodiversity
A striking decline in ant biodiversity found on land converted to a rubber plantation in China. (2016-05-16)
Biodiversity loss in forests will be pricey
A new global assessment of forests -- perhaps the largest terrestrial repositories of biodiversity -- suggests that, on average, a 10 percent loss in biodiversity leads to a 2 to 3 percent loss in the productivity, including biomass, that forests can offer. (2016-10-13)
Why are there so many types of lizards?
Researchers from Arizona State University School of Life Sciences and Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute have sequenced the complete genetic code -- the genome -- of several vertebrate species from Panama. (2018-02-23)
Evolution: The beneficiaries of mass extinction
Mass extinctions were followed by periods of low diversity in which certain new species dominated wide regions of the supercontinent Pangaea, reports a new study. (2017-10-10)
Climate change and habitat conversion combine to homogenize nature
Climate change and habitat conversion to agriculture are working together to homogenize nature, indicates a study in the journal Global Change Biology led by the University of California, Davis. (2017-08-18)
Seagrass biodiversity is both a goal and a means for restoration
Planting multiple seagrass species, rather than a single species, could be better for restoring damaged coastal ecosystems in Indonesia's Coral Triangle. (2017-11-08)
Study examines conflict between farmers and livestock predators
A new Journal of Wildlife Management study conducted in South Africa has found that black-backed jackals, a similar species to coyotes and dingoes, prefer to eat livestock rather than similar-sized wild prey, which has important consequences for livestock husbandry and the management of predators. (2017-12-20)
Visitors to countryside not attracted by conservation importance
Countryside visitors choose where to go based on the presence of features such as coastline, woodland or abundant footpaths, rather than a site's importance to conservation, according to new research. (2016-11-09)
HKU discovers important interaction between land use and climate change in driving species distribution shifts
Climate change is altering where species live all over the planet. (2018-05-06)
Nitrogen is a neglected threat to biodiversity
Nitrogen pollution is a recognized threat to sensitive species and ecosystems. (2016-02-24)
Hidden Inca treasure: Remarkable new tree genus discovered in the Andes
Hidden in plain sight -- that's how researchers describe their discovery of a new genus of large forest tree commonly found, yet previously scientifically unknown, in the tropical Andes. (2017-09-07)
Caught on camera: Amazonian crop raiders
Caught on camera in the jungle, a striking set of photos from the University of East Anglia (UK) reveal the secret lives of Amazonian crop-raiding animals. (2018-03-01)
FSU researchers: Savanna fires pump Central African forests full of nitrogen
Florida State University researchers are part of a global team of scientists revealing the unexpected role that large-scale fires and high nitrogen deposition play in the ecology and biogeochemistry of these lush Central African forests. (2018-02-08)
UA scientist studies effects of wildfire management on bird populations
On the tail of California's most destructive and expensive year of firefighting ever, it might seem obvious that vegetation removal would reduce the risk of such a year happening again. (2018-02-14)
New 'big-armed fly' species named after former California governor Arnold Schwarzenegger
A new fly species with bulging forelegs is named after former California governor and famous bodybuilder and actor Arnold Schwarzenegger. (2018-01-24)
Conservation hindered by geographical mismatches between capacity and need
New research suggests that geographical mismatches between conservation needs and expertise may hinder global conservation goals. (2017-08-30)
Theory of oscillations may explain biological mysteries
An article by John Vandermeer of the University of Michigan shows how extensions of established theory can model coupled oscillations resulting from interactions such as predation and competition. (2006-12-01)
Climate engineering, once started, would have severe impacts if stopped
Facing a climate crisis, we may someday spray sulfur dioxide into the upper atmosphere to form a cloud that cools the Earth, but suddenly stopping the spraying would have a severe global impact on animals and plants, according to the first study on the potential biological impacts of geoengineering, or climate intervention. (2018-01-22)
Climate change: Soil animals cannot explain self-reinforcing effect
Leipzig. When the soil warms up, it releases more carbon dioxide (CO2) -- an effect that further fuels climate change. (2017-12-21)
Amazon biodiversity hotspot to suffer even more losses after contentious law passed
In August 2017, the Bolivian government passed a contentious law that paved the way for construction of a new 190-mile road cutting through one of the country's most iconic and biodiverse protected rainforests. (2018-01-08)
Antarctica's biodiversity is under threat
A unique international study has debunked the popular view that Antarctica and the Southern Ocean are in much better ecological shape than the rest of the world. (2017-04-20)
The blue whale genome reveals the animals' extraordinary evolutionary history
For the first time, scientists of the German Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Center, Goethe University and the University of Lund in Sweden have deciphered the complete genome of the blue whale and three other rorquals. (2018-04-06)
Expanding tropical forest spells disaster for conservation
A North Carolina State University study shows that fire suppression efforts in Brazilian savannas turn many of those areas into forest lands, with negative consequences for the plants and animals that live there. (2017-08-30)
Human-centered design is key to forming partnerships for large-scale conservation success
The findings, published in PLOS ONE on March 9, question previous assumptions in the field that the payments themselves are the most effective motivator of participation. (2018-03-29)
Pokémon-like card game can help teach ecology: UBC research
Playing a Pokémon-like card game about ecology and biodiversity can result in broader knowledge of species and a better understanding of ecosystems than traditional teaching methods, like slideshows, according to new research from the University of British Columbia. (2019-07-17)
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