Popular Biological Invasion News and Current Events

Popular Biological Invasion News and Current Events, Biological Invasion News Articles.
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UH Cancer Center researcher finds new driver of an aggressive form of brain cancer
University of Hawai'i Cancer Center researchers have identified an essential driver of tumor cell invasion in glioblastoma, the most aggressive form of brain cancer that can occur at any age. The discovery can help researchers create novel targeted therapies potentially reducing deaths from this devastating cancer. (2016-11-14)

What does marketing have to do with ill-advised consumer behavior?
A biological account of human behavior can benefit human welfare and marketing can play a critical role in facilitating public understanding and acceptance of biological causation. (2021-01-13)

Immune cells halt fungal infection by triggering spore suicide
To protect the body from infection, immune cells in the lungs can exploit cell death programs in inhaled fungal pathogens, scientists have revealed, helping explain why most people aren't harmed by breathing in mold spores, and potentially offering new therapeutic strategies for people who do get infected. (2017-09-07)

Climate change affects fish reproductive phenology in plateau area: Study
The Research Group of Biological Invasion and Adaptive Evolution (BIAE; PI: CHEN Yifeng) at Institute of Hydrobiology (IHB) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences recently answered how reproductive phenology of Gymnocypris selincuoensis, an endemic fish in Lake Selicuo in Tibetan Plateau, associated with climate changes. (2018-01-19)

Religious devotion as predictor of behavior
'Religious Devotion and Extrinsic Religiosity Affect In-group Altruism and Out-group Hostility Oppositely in Rural Jamaica,' suggests that a sincere belief in God -- religious devotion -- is unrelated to feelings of prejudice. Rather, Lynch's research finds that those whose religious beliefs are extrinsic -- who use religion as a way to achieve non-religious goals such as attaining status or joining a social group -- and who regularly attend religious services are more likely to hold hostile attitudes toward outsiders. (2017-05-24)

Light is enough to peer through a mouse skull
Having selected proper light waves, researchers have demonstrated a more than 10-fold improvement of light energy delivery to targets that are too deeply embedded to visualize with current optical imaging. Able to picture through a young mouse skull in the laboratory, this noninvasive technique does not cause any damage to tissues and does not need injections of fluorescent molecules to label the target. (2018-03-26)

New understanding of why cancer cells move
A University of Hawai'i Cancer Center researcher has identified how some cancer cells are made to move during metastasis. The research provides a better understanding of how cancer spreads and may create new opportunities for cancer drug development. (2017-12-27)

Fear of 'killer shrimps' could pose major threat to European rivers
The fear of invasive 'killer shrimps' can intimidate native organisms to such a degree that they are incapable of performing their vital role in river systems, a new study suggests. (2019-06-04)

Flipping lipids for cell transport-tubules
An enzyme that flips lipids from the outer to the inner layer of the cell membrane launches the process that permits cells to engulf external substances. (2018-03-29)

Preventing people from abandoning exotic pets that threatened biodiversity
Abandoning exotic pets is an ethical problem that can lead to biological invasions that threaten conservation of biodiversity in the environment. An article published in the journal Biological Invasions, whose first author is the researcher Alberto Maceda Veiga, from the Biodiversity Research Institute of the University of Barcelona (IRBio), reveals that the release of invasive species in the environment has not been reduced despite the regulation that prohibits the possession of these species since 2011. (2019-07-25)

Discovery of a mechanism for determining the direction of collective cell migration
The phenomenon of collective cell migration has been observed in the process of animal development, the healing of wounds, and cancer cell invasion. Professors Kazuhiro Aoki et al. of the National Institute for Basic Biology have found that when the activity of a molecule called ERK MAP kinase is propagated to neighboring cells, the cells migrate in the opposite direction of ERK propagation. (2017-12-04)

Theory of oscillations may explain biological mysteries
An article by John Vandermeer of the University of Michigan shows how extensions of established theory can model coupled oscillations resulting from interactions such as predation and competition. Such coupling can have far-reaching effects that may explain the higher-than-expected diversity of plankton in aquatic ecosystems and other paradoxes of species distribution. (2006-12-01)

Parasite study paves way for therapies to tackle deadly infections
New understanding of a parasite that causes a million cases of disease each year could point towards effective drug treatments. (2017-10-10)

Meal times may be key to managing malaria, parasite study shows
Malaria infections might be brought under control by managing the meal times of infected people or animals, a study suggests. (2018-03-09)

Should all patients be asked about their sexual orientation?
In late 2017, NHS England released guidelines recommending that health professionals ask all patients about their sexual orientation in order to improve services for non-heterosexual patients, but should they? Experts debate the issue in The BMJ today. (2018-01-17)

Research shows how environment plays key role in changing movement behavior of animals
University of Leicester mathematicians develop theory which helps to unravel long-standing mysteries of animal movement. (2017-10-30)

Artificial and biological cells work together as mini chemical factories
Researchers have fused living and non-living cells for the first time in a way that allows them to work together, paving the way for new applications. (2018-03-14)

Study reveals complex biology, gender differences, in kidney cancer
A new study is believed to be the first to describe the unique role of androgens in kidney cancer, and it suggests that a new approach to treatment, targeting the androgen receptor (AR), is worth further investigation. The study shows that in renal cell carcinoma androgen signaling can either stimulate or suppress tumor cells' movement and invasion to different locations in the body. (2017-10-13)

Mutation explains why some people are more vulnerable to viral brain infection
Scientists identified mutations in a single gene that impair immunity to viruses in a region of the brain called the brain stem. (2018-02-22)

Breast cancer cells become invasive by changing their identity
Researchers from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have identified a protein that determines the identity and invasive properties of breast cancer cells. The finding could lead to the development of new therapeutic and diagnostic strategies to target breast cancer invasion and metastasis. The study is published in the scientific journal Cancer Research. (2018-11-05)

Genetic drift caught in action in invasive birds
Studies of island bird populations have taught us a lot about evolution, but it's hard to catch birds in the act of naturally colonizing new islands. Instead, a new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances examines what's happened by looking at the genetics of a species that arrived in Hawaii in the twentieth century through decidedly unnatural means--us. (2018-01-17)

Billions of plastic items are sickening coral reefs
A new study estimates that 11.1 billion plastic items are lodged along coral reefs across the Asia-Pacific, and that their presence increases the risk of coral disease from 4 to 89 percent, in some cases. (2018-01-25)

Call for action to tackle threat to a global biodiversity hotspot
An invasive Australian tree is now posing a serious threat to a global diversity 'hotspot' in the natural forests of Jamaica's Blue and John Crow Mountains National Park. The tree species, Pittosporum undulatum, known locally as 'mock orange', is threatening many rare and endangered species, some of which are found nowhere else in the world. Scientists are urging the relevant institutions to prioritise a programme of control of this species. (2018-01-02)

Breast cancer cells turn killer immune cells into allies
Researchers at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have discovered that breast cancer cells can alter the function of immune cells known as Natural killer (NK) cells so that instead of killing the cancer cells, they facilitate their spread to other parts of the body. The study, which will be published July 9 in the Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), suggests that preventing this reprogramming might stop breast cancer from metastasizing to other tissues, a major cause of death in breast cancer patients. (2020-07-09)

Invasive species not best conservation tool: Study
Harnessing an invasive fish species sounded like a promising conservation tool to help reverse the destruction wreaked by zebra mussels on endangered native mollusks in the Great Lakes -- except that it won't work, says a University of Guelph ecologist. (2016-04-06)

Invasive species could cause billions in damages to agriculture
Invasive insects and pathogens could be a multi-billion- dollar threat to global agriculture and developing countries may be the biggest target, according to a team of international researchers. (2016-06-20)

Lionfish decimating tropical fish populations, threaten coral reefs
The invasion of predatory lionfish in the Caribbean region poses yet another major threat there to coral reef ecosystems -- a new study has found that within a short period after the entry of lionfish into an area, the survival of other reef fishes is slashed by about 80 percent. (2008-07-17)

Newly identified pathway in mitochondria fuels tumor progression across cancer types
Scientists at The Wistar Institute have identified a novel protein pathway across several types of cancer that controls how tumor cells acquire the energy necessary for movement, invasion and metastasis. This protein pathway was previously only observed in neurons and represents a potential therapeutic target for several types of cancer. (2016-12-19)

Cells' mechanical memory could hold clues to cancer metastasis
In the body, cells move around to form organs during development; to heal wounds; and when they metastasize from cancerous tumors. A mechanical engineer at Washington University in St. Louis found that cells remember the properties they had in their first environment for several days after they move to another in a process called mechanical memory. (2017-10-25)

In the game of love, local salmon have a home-ground advantage
Genetic analysis of thousands of salmon shows that in salmon mating, home-ground advantage applies. Salmon spawning in their home river produce vastly more offspring than salmon trying their luck on unfamiliar spawning grounds. (2019-02-27)

Currents propel the spreading of invasive jellyfish
Twelve years ago, the comb jelly Mnemiopsis leidyi, originating from the North American East Coast, appeared in northern European waters. Based on the first comprehensive data collection on the occurrence of this invasive jellyfish in Europe, scientists from 19 countries led by the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel and Technical University of Denmark have now shown that ocean currents play a key role for this successful invasion. The study has been published in the international journal Global Ecology and Biogeography. (2018-05-25)

Felling pines: Doing it sooner rather than later is better for fynbos
Here's some advice for landowners wanting to remove pine trees in the hope of seeing fynbos plants on their properties again: do so before the trees have grown there for more than 30 years. The longer they wait, the less likely the chances that any fynbos seeds will be left in the soil to sprout successfully, according to researchers from Stellenbosch University and the City of Cape Town, in the South African Journal of Botany. (2017-11-22)

New insights into the effect of aging on cardiovascular disease
Aging adults are more likely to have - and die from - cardiovascular disease than their younger counterparts. New basic science research finds reason to link biological aging to the development of narrowed, hardened arteries, independent of other risk factors like high cholesterol. (2019-12-10)

New micro-platform reveals cancer cells' natural behavior
A new cell culture platform allows researchers to observe never-before-seen behaviors of live cancer cells under the microscope, leading to explanations of long-known cancer characteristics. (2018-09-19)

Genetics help make a weed a weed
New University of British Columbia research finds that the success of weedy and invasive plants like the Jerusalem artichoke lies in their genes. (2018-05-07)

New tool for tracking 'kiss-and-run' communication between cells
Virtually all aspects of life and disease depend of brief exchanges between cells. A new technique to study cell-to-cell contacts lets interacting cells 'smear' one another with the biological equivalent of lipstick. (2018-01-30)

Russian scientists learned to perform the diagnose by analyzing saliva
Researchers of Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) within the framework of the Project 5-100 developed a unique method of immune diseases diagnosing before the symptoms appear. Scientists proposed a laser-correlation spectroscopic technique (also called dynamic light scattering) for studying the immune response in body fluids, for example, in saliva. (2018-04-20)

Cancer killing clue could lead to safer and more powerful immunotherapies
The study, led by Dr Misty Jenkins from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, explains the crucial mechanisms by which CAR-T cell therapy is able to rapidly target and kill cancer cells, and why it may cause serious side effects. (2018-02-12)

How invasive species threaten bats
A new review is the first to describe the scope of threats to bats by invasive species. (2017-08-30)

Rotavirus cell invasion triggers a cacophony of calcium signals
Time-lapsing imaging and other experimental approaches reveal that rotavirus induces hundreds of discrete and highly dynamic calcium spikes that increase during peak infection. (2019-07-25)

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