Popular Biological Sciences News and Current Events

Popular Biological Sciences News and Current Events, Biological Sciences News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Not just images
Hebrew University scientists have successfully transformed an MRI from a diagnostic camera into a device that can record changes in the biological makeup of brain tissue. The development will help doctors understand whether a patient is merely aging or developing a neurodegenerative disease, such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's. (2019-09-05)

What does marketing have to do with ill-advised consumer behavior?
A biological account of human behavior can benefit human welfare and marketing can play a critical role in facilitating public understanding and acceptance of biological causation. (2021-01-13)

Scientist emphasizes importance of multi-level thinking
An unusual paper by Prof. Michael E. McIntyre from University of Cambridge touches on a range of deep questions, including insights into the nature of science itself, and of scientific understanding -- what it means to understand a scientific problem in depth -- and into the communication skills necessary to convey that understanding and to mediate collaboration across specialist disciplines. (2017-08-17)

Breaking the protein-DNA bond
A new Northwestern University study finds that unbound proteins in a cell break up protein-DNA bonds as they compete for the single-binding site. (2017-04-04)

Research shows how 'Mallard' dye fills need for speed
Scientists at the University of York have developed a new medical tool which could help surgeons carrying out complex procedures in the operating room. Researchers have developed a dye which provides a quick and accurate method of checking heparin levels in the blood. (2013-02-14)

'Invisible' bacteria dupe the human immune system
Scientists at the University of York have characterized an important new step in the mechanism used by bacteria to evade our immune system. (2008-02-19)

Light is enough to peer through a mouse skull
Having selected proper light waves, researchers have demonstrated a more than 10-fold improvement of light energy delivery to targets that are too deeply embedded to visualize with current optical imaging. Able to picture through a young mouse skull in the laboratory, this noninvasive technique does not cause any damage to tissues and does not need injections of fluorescent molecules to label the target. (2018-03-26)

How do neural support cells affect nerve function?
Glial cells may modulate the release of neurotransmitters -- chemicals that relay signals between nerve cells -- by increasing the acidity of the extracellular environment. (2018-02-21)

Theory of oscillations may explain biological mysteries
An article by John Vandermeer of the University of Michigan shows how extensions of established theory can model coupled oscillations resulting from interactions such as predation and competition. Such coupling can have far-reaching effects that may explain the higher-than-expected diversity of plankton in aquatic ecosystems and other paradoxes of species distribution. (2006-12-01)

Study finds minority trainees are up, but not minority faculty
Despite increasing numbers of underrepresented minority (URM) trainees in the biomedical sciences, there is a persistent shortage of URM faculty who are involved in basic biomedical research at medical schools. Vanderbilt investigators examined the entire training pathway of potential faculty candidates to identify points of greatest loss of URM trainees. They report Jan. 16 in PLOS ONE two key points of loss: during undergraduate education and in transition from postdoctoral fellowship to tenure-track faculty. (2018-01-17)

RNAs help molecules come together in liquid-like droplets within living cells
Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill collaborated to determine how proteins and messenger RNAs condense into liquid-like droplets within cells. The activity is a normal biological process, but it can lead to neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's disease when it goes awry. The researchers found that the process is regulated by molecules of RNA that recognize each other and combine based on the very specific and complex shapes of RNA molecules. (2018-04-12)

Systems biology approach identifies nutrient regulation of biological clock in plants
Using a systems biological analysis of genome-scale data from the model plant Arabidopsis, an international team of researchers identified that the master gene controlling the biological clock is sensitive to nutrient status. The study will appear in the latest issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2008-03-14)

Parasite study paves way for therapies to tackle deadly infections
New understanding of a parasite that causes a million cases of disease each year could point towards effective drug treatments. (2017-10-10)

Meal times may be key to managing malaria, parasite study shows
Malaria infections might be brought under control by managing the meal times of infected people or animals, a study suggests. (2018-03-09)

Artificial and biological cells work together as mini chemical factories
Researchers have fused living and non-living cells for the first time in a way that allows them to work together, paving the way for new applications. (2018-03-14)

The cooperative view: New evidence suggests a symbiogenetic origin for the centrosome
Two scientists who relocated to the MBL in Woods Hole after their New Orleans laboratory was disrupted by Hurricane Katrina publish their study of centrosomal RNAs in this week's PNAS Online Early Edition. (2008-05-06)

Genes contribute to biological motion perception and its covariation with autistic traits
Dr. JIANG Yi, Dr. WANG Ying and their colleagues from the State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Science, Institute of Psychology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have conducted a behavioral genetic study to find out the sources underlying the individual differences in biological motion perception. (2018-01-22)

Algae could feed and fuel planet with aid of new high-tech tool
Vast quantities of medicines and renewable fuels could be produced by algae using a new gene-editing technique, a study suggests. (2017-12-07)

Scientists synthesized a new substance with considerable antitumoral properties
Scientists from Far Eastern Federal University developed a new synthetic derivative of fascaplysin -- a biologically active substance with antitumoral properties obtained from sea sponges. Biological tests have shown that the compound is 2-3 times more active than fascaplysin. The results of the study were published in the well-known scientific journal Tetrahedron Letters. (2018-03-19)

Biological sex tweaks nervous system networks, plays role in shaping behavior
New research published today in the journal Current Biology demonstrates how biological sex can modify communication between nerve cells and generate different responses in males and females to the same stimulus. The findings could new shed light on the genetic underpinnings of sex differences in neural development, behavior, and susceptibility to diseases. (2018-03-08)

Polymers that mimic chameleon skin
Biological tissues have complex mechanical properties -- soft-yet-strong, tough-yet-flexible -- that are difficult to reproduce using synthetic materials. An international team (CNRS, Université de Haute-Alsace, ESRF the European Synchrotron, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and University of Akron) has managed to produce a biocompatible synthetic material that replicates tissue mechanics and alters color when it changes shape, like chameleon skin. It promises new materials for biomedical devices. (2018-03-29)

Scientists discover key gene for producing marine molecule with huge environmental impacts
Researchers have discovered a key gene for the synthesis of one of the world's most abundant sulfur molecules -- Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP). DMSP is an important nutrient in marine environments with more than one billion tonnes produced annually by marine phytoplankton, seaweed and bacteria. The discovery represents a huge step forward in the field of sulfur cycling in marine environments. It could also allow scientists to better predict the impact of climate change on DMSP production. (2018-02-26)

Bridging the gaps in global conservation
The BioScience Talks podcast features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences. (2018-05-09)

Viruses are everywhere, maybe even in space
Viruses are the most abundant and one of the least understood biological entities on Earth. They might also exist in space, but as of yet scientists have done almost no research into this possibility. Portland State University biology professor Ken Stedman and colleagues are trying to change this through their article (2018-01-18)

Deep Aging Clocks: The emergence of AI-based biomarkers of aging and longevity
The advent of deep biomarkers of aging, longevity and mortality presents a range of non-obvious applications. (2019-07-03)

Research brief: New approach boosts effort to scale up biodiversity monitoring
The value of ecological biodiversity for maintaining ecosystem stability and function is well established, but a recent study points to a novel way to fine-tune our ability to measure it at larger scales. (2018-06-01)

A biological solution to carbon capture and recycling?
Scientists at the University of Dundee have discovered that E. coli bacteria could hold the key to an efficient method of capturing and storing or recycling carbon dioxide. Professor Frank Sargent and colleagues at the University of Dundee's School of Life Sciences, working with local industry partners Sasol UK and Ingenza Ltd, have developed a process that enables the E. coli bacterium to act as a very efficient carbon capture device. (2018-01-08)

Entangling biological systems
Using green fluorescent proteins obtained from Escherichia coli, researchers at Northwestern University demonstrate quantum mechanical effects from a biological system. (2017-12-05)

Interdisciplinary approaches to wildlife trade management
The BioScience Talks podcast features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences. (2017-10-12)

Biological clock found in fungal parasite sheds more light on 'zombie ants' phenomenon
A working biological clock has been found in a fungal parasite that infects ants to control their behavior and lead them away from their nests in an effort to spread their fungal spores more effectively. (2017-11-06)

Under-fives should be priority for snail fever therapy, study finds
Pre-school children in sub-Saharan Africa should be tested regularly for a common infection known as snail fever, which would reduce the spread of the disease. (2018-04-17)

Meat consumption contributing to global obesity
Should we be warning consumers about over-consumption of meat as well as sugar? (2016-08-01)

U of T Mississauga study identifies 'master pacemaker' for biological clocks
What makes a biological clock tick? According to a new study from U of T Mississauga, the surprising answer lies with a gene typically associated with stem and cancer cells. (2019-03-27)

Tiny protein offers major insight into foot-and-mouth virus
Scientists have identified that a tiny protein, which plays a major role in the replication of foot-and-mouth disease virus, demonstrates a greater level of genetic economy than previously reported. (2017-10-03)

A waterway bounces back following the passage of the Clean Water Act
The BioScience Talks podcast features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences. (2017-11-08)

The use of electrospun scaffolds in musculoskeletal tissue engineering
Rotator Cuff tears affect 15 percent of 60 year olds and carry a significant social and financial burden. Current operative techniques and repair adjuncts are associated with unacceptably high failure rates, stimulating investigation into novel tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) approaches in the field of rotator cuff surgery. In this review researchers explore the most recent advances in the field of electrospinning, focussing on proposed tissue-engineered solutions in tendon, specifically the rotator cuff. (2018-12-10)

Quantum machine shows promise for biological research
Much has been stated about the promise of quantum computing for myriad of applications but there have been few examples of a quantum advantage for real-world problems of practical interest. USC researchers have demonstrated how a quantum processor could be used as a predictive tool to assess a fundamental process in biology: the binding of gene regulatory proteins to the genome. This is one of the first documented examples in which a physical quantum processor has been applied to real biological data. (2018-02-27)

Why do older male birds father more illegitimate children?
When female birds have chicks as the result of an extra-marital fling, the fathers are almost always older males, and scientists are finding out why. (2018-05-31)

Forensic researchers find more accurate way to estimate age of deceased
Forensic researchers have found a more accurate way to assess an individual's age at death, based on the bone mineral density of the femur. The technique could be used to help identify human remains. (2018-01-23)

NUS study yields valuable insights on underreporting in international wildlife trade
Researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) have established several key trends in wildlife trade following an in-depth study on international wildlife trade data. The findings shed light on the market forces driving the movement of wildlife products around the globe, and indicate our understanding of illegal and legal wildlife trade is biased towards certain species and regions of the globe. (2018-02-11)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.