Popular Biomaterials News and Current Events

Popular Biomaterials News and Current Events, Biomaterials News Articles.
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New innovations in cell-free biotechnology
Professor Michael Jewett's new platform to conduct cell-free protein synthesis could lead to improved quality of manufactured protein therapeutics and biomaterials. (2018-03-23)

Practical hair regeneration technology
Researchers have developed a method for the mass preparation of cellular aggregates, also known as 'hair follicle germs (HFGs)', that may lead to a new treatment for hair loss. (2018-02-01)

HKBU Chinese medicine scholars develop HKBU Chinese medicine scholars develop
Chinese Medicine scholars at Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) have succeeded in developing a novel targeted delivery system for CRISPR/Cas9 to achieve therapeutic genome editing of VEGFA in osteosarcoma (OS). (2017-11-10)

Study: Use of prefabricated blood vessels may revolutionize root canals
Researchers at OHSU in Portland, Oregon, have developed a process by which they can engineer new blood vessels in teeth, creating better long-term outcomes for root canal patients and clinicians. (2017-06-12)

3-DIY: Printing your own bioprinter
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a low-cost 3-D bioprinter by modifying a standard desktop 3-D printer, and they have released the breakthrough designs as open source so that anyone can build their own system. (2018-03-27)

Cancer cells thrive in stiff tissue, according to new study
Scientists studying tumor growth and metastasis at the University of Notre Dame fabricated a human tissue model to examine how cancer cells interact with connective tissue in the breast. (2018-05-04)

Origami inspires new tech for tissue regeneration
Origami -- the Japanese art of folding paper into shapes and figures -- dates back to the sixth century. At UMass Lowell, it is inspiring researchers as they develop a 21st century solution to the shortage of tissue and organ donors. (2018-05-24)

Intelligent gel attacks cancer
A new injectable 'biogel' is effective in delivering anti-cancer agents directly into cancerous tumors and killing them. This technology, developed by researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre, has already been successfully tested in the laboratory. If it works in patients, the therapy could one day revolutionize treatment for many forms of cancer. (2015-11-19)

What can we learn from dinosaur proteins?
Researchers recently confirmed it is possible to extract proteins from 80-million-year-old dinosaur bones. The discovery sparks hopes for new insights about evolution and environmental change and could even offer useful clues for drug discovery or the search for extraterrestrial life. (2017-04-24)

Reviewing advanced applications in drug delivery and medicine
This review seeks to analyze current advances of potential applications of graphene and its family of nano-materials for drug delivery and other major biomedical purposes. (2019-01-11)

Researchers develop injectable bandage
A penetrating injury from shrapnel is a serious obstacle in overcoming battlefield wounds that can ultimately lead to death.Given the high mortality rates due to hemorrhaging, there is an unmet need to quickly self-administer materials that prevent fatality due to excessive blood loss. (2018-04-02)

Human skin pigmentation recreated -- with a 3-D bioprinter
A new method for controlling pigmentation in fabricated human skin has been developed by researchers from A*STAR's Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology (SIMTech) and the Singapore Centre for 3-D Printing (SC3DP) at Nanyang Technological University. (2018-01-23)

New UD tissue-engineering research focuses on vocal cords
Damaged or diseased vocal cords can forever change and even silence the voices we love, from a family member's to a famous personality's. Engineering pliable, new vocal cord tissue to replace scarred, rigid tissue in these petite, yet powerful organs is the goal of a new University of Delaware research project. It is funded by a five-year, $1.8 million grant from the National Institutes of Health's National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. (2007-07-31)

Cells' mechanical memory could hold clues to cancer metastasis
In the body, cells move around to form organs during development; to heal wounds; and when they metastasize from cancerous tumors. A mechanical engineer at Washington University in St. Louis found that cells remember the properties they had in their first environment for several days after they move to another in a process called mechanical memory. (2017-10-25)

Scientists develop elastic metal rods to treat scoliosis
NUST MISIS scientists jointly with their colleagues from the Ecole de Technologie Superiore (Montreal, Canada) have experienced a new combination of alloy processing that produces solid and durable implants that are fully compatible with the human body. The research article is published in the Journal of Alloys and Compounds. (2018-03-23)

Tailored organoid may help unravel immune response mystery
Cornell and Weill Cornell Medicine researchers report on the use of biomaterials-based organoids in an attempt to reproduce immune-system events and gain a better understanding of B cells. (2017-01-06)

Plaster which sticks inside the mouth will revolutionise treatment of oral conditions
A new biodegradable patch administers steroids directly to oral ulcers and forms a protective barrier. (2018-06-25)

Stingray soft robot could lead to bio-inspired robotics
UCLA bioengineering professor Ali Khademhosseini has led the development of a tissue-based soft robot that mimics the biomechanics of a stingray. The new technology could lead to advances in bio-inspired robotics, regenerative medicine and medical diagnostics. (2018-01-12)

Major enhancement to in vitro testing of human liver-stage malaria
Researchers have developed an enhanced method to conducting liver-stage malaria research in vitro, allowing them to more quickly screen preclinical drugs and vaccines than current techniques. (2018-05-09)

Designing vaccines from artificial proteins
EPFL scientists have developed a new computational approach to create artificial proteins, which showed promising results in vivo as functional vaccines. This approach opens the possibility to engineer safer and more effective vaccines. (2020-05-14)

Modified biomaterials self-assemble on temperature cues
Biomedical engineers from Duke University have demonstrated a new approach to making self-assembled biomaterials that relies on protein modifications and temperature. The hybrid approach allows researchers to control self-assembly more precisely, which may prove useful for a variety of biomedical applications, from drug delivery to wound-healing. (2018-03-19)

New cellular insights in bone development
Most of us don't think about our teeth and bones until one aches or breaks. A team of engineers at Washington University in St. Louis looked deep within collagen fibers to see how the body forms new bone and teeth, seeking insights into faster bone healing and new biomaterials. (2018-04-06)

Making intricate images with bacterial communities
A technique for growing sticky films of bacteria into elaborate microscopic images could reveal how potentially dangerous biofilms grow and transmit antibiotic resistance, and could lead to novel biomaterials or synthetic microbial communities. (2018-03-19)

Particulate vaccine delivery systems may help
Most traditional vaccines have safety and efficacy issues, whereas particulate vaccine delivery systems -- which utilize nano- or micro-particulate carriers to protect and deliver antigens--are efficient, stable, include molecules to bolster immune responses, and minimize adverse reactions due to the use of biocompatible biomaterials. A new review summarizes the current status of research efforts to develop particulate vaccine delivery systems against bioterrorism agents and emerging infectious pathogens. (2016-04-06)

New dental material resists plaque and kills microbes, Penn dental team finds
In a new study, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania evaluated a new dental material tethered with an antimicrobial compound that can not only kill bacteria but can also resist biofilm growth. In addition, unlike some drug-infused materials, it is effective with minimal toxicity to the surrounding tissue, as it contains a low dose of the antimicrobial agent that kills only the bacteria that come in contact with it. (2017-12-04)

Cells 'walk' on liquids a bit like geckos
Researchers at Queen Mary University of London have discovered that cells can 'walk' on liquids a bit like the way geckos stick to other surfaces. (2018-02-14)

UBC researcher looks to the future of bone replacements
A UBC Okanagan researcher has discovered a new artificial bone design that can be customized and made with a 3-D printer for stronger, safer and more effective bone replacements. (2017-08-17)

3-D-printable implants may ease damaged knees
A cartilage-mimicking material created by researchers at Duke University may allow surgeons to 3-D print knee menisci or other replacement parts that are custom-shaped to each patient's anatomy. The hydrogel-based material is the first to match human cartilage in strength and elasticity while also remaining 3-D-printable and stable inside the body. (2017-04-19)

Fighting myocardial infarction with nanoparticle tandems
How can damaged cardiac tissue following a heart attack best be treated with replacement muscle cells? A research team is now presenting an innovative method on mice: Muscle replacement cells, which are to take over the function of the damaged tissue, are loaded with magnetic nanoparticles. These cells are then injected into the damaged heart muscle and held in place by a magnet, causing the cells to engraft better onto the existing tissue. (2017-12-01)

Dealing a therapeutic counterblow to traumatic brain injury
A team of NJIT biomedical engineers are developing a therapy which shows early indications it can protect neurons and stimulate the regrowth of blood vessels in damaged tissue. (2019-10-03)

New 3D printing technique for biomaterials
A new way of 3D printing soft materials such as gels and collagens offers a major step forward in the manufacture of artificial medical implants. (2019-10-04)

Far-red fluorescent silk can kill harmful bacteria as biomedical and environmental remedy
A silk hybrid material attacks bacteria when illuminated by a green light, thanks to a far-red fluorescent protein researchers transferred to its genetic makeup. (2018-04-19)

Not all stem cells are equally efficient for use in regenerative medicine
Scientists at the University of Granada and Alcala de Henares University have concluded that, contrary to what was thought, only a specific group of cord blood stem cells maintained in culture are useful for therapeutic purposes. (2013-01-09)

3D printed tissues may keep athletes in action
Bioscientists at Rice and the University of Maryland with the Center for Engineering Complex Tissues learn to 3D-print scaffolds that may help heal osteochondral injuries of the sort suffered by many athletes. (2019-03-28)

The fight against tooth decay gets help with a new smart material from U of T researchers
When patients go to the dentist to fill a cavity, they're trying to solve a problem -- not create a new one. But many dental patients get some bad news: bacteria can dig under their tooth-coloured fillings and cause new cavities, called recurrent caries. U of T researchers designed a novel solution: a filling material with tiny particles containing antimicrobial drugs, designed to stop bacteria in its tracks. (2018-01-30)

Novel anti-cancer nanomedicine for efficient chemotherapy
Researchers have developed a new anti-cancer nanomedicine for targeted cancer chemotherapy. This new nano-tool provides a new approach to use cell-based nanomedicines for efficient cancer chemotherapy. (2019-09-17)

Course set to overcome mismatch between lab-designed nanomaterials and nature's complexity
Advances in nanotechnology have made it possible to control the size, shape, composition, elasticity and chemical properties of laboratory-made nanomaterials. Yet many of these materials do not to function as expected in the body. In a recent issue of Biointerphases, the team homes in on biomembranes -- the gatekeeping bilipid-layers and proteins surrounding cells. They explore the barriers a synthetic nanomaterial must breach to enter a cell and achieve its intended purpose. (2018-04-16)

Flexible solar cells: Will they someday power your devices?
Researchers in Finland and Montreal are looking at the challenges of mass producing and commercializing the now-experimental technology. (2018-06-06)

Scientists developed enzymes with remote control
Scientists developed a method to enhance the activity of enzymes by using radio frequency radiation. The method requires making a special complex consisting of enzymes and magnetic nanoparticles. The particles can adsorb radio emission and convert it to heat, resulting in enzymatic processes acceleration by more than four times. Such method can be used to create radio-controlled biochemical systems and adjust metabolism in living organisms. The results are published in ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering. (2018-11-21)

New material with built-in vitamin A may reduce scarring
Material can be used to treat damaged blood vessels or to make medical devices with intrinsic healing properties, which could reduce tissue scarring. (2016-01-27)

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