Popular Biomedical Engineering News and Current Events

Popular Biomedical Engineering News and Current Events, Biomedical Engineering News Articles.
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3D bioprinting technique could create artificial blood vessels, organ tissue
University of Colorado Boulder engineers have developed a 3D printing technique that allows for localized control of an object's firmness, opening up new biomedical avenues that could one day include artificial arteries and organ tissue. (2018-10-22)

Pascali honored for contributions to engineering education
Raresh Pascali, instructional associate professor in the Mechanical Engineering Technology Program at the University of Houston, has been named the 2016 recipient of the Ross Kastor Educator Award. The award, named for a longtime drilling engineer with Shell Oil Co., is presented by the petroleum division of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. It recognizes dedication to improving engineering and science awareness for students and improving educational opportunities for future industry leaders. (2016-05-17)

Tissue engineering advance reduces heart failure in model of heart attack
Researchers have grown heart tissue by seeding a mix of human cells onto a 1-micron-resolution scaffold made with a 3-D printer. The cells organized themselves in the scaffold to create engineered heart tissue that beats synchronously in culture. When the human-derived heart muscle patch was surgically placed onto a mouse heart after a heart attack, it significantly improved heart function and decreased the amount of dead heart tissue. (2017-01-25)

Researchers are first to see DNA 'blink'
Northwestern University biomedical engineers have developed imaging technology that is the first to see DNA 'blink,' or fluoresce. The tool enables researchers to study individual biomolecules (DNA, chromatin, proteins) as well as important global patterns of gene expression, which could yield insights into cancer. Vadim Backman will discuss the technology and its applications -- including the new concept of macrogenomics, a technology aiming to regulate the global patterns of gene expression without gene editing -- at the 2017 AAAS annual meeting. (2017-02-17)

Study describes changes to structural brain networks after radiotherapy for brain tumors
Researchers compared the thickness of brain cortex in patients with brain tumors before and after radiation therapy was applied and found significant dose-dependent changes in the structural properties of cortical neural networks, at both the local and global level. (2017-06-26)

Engineering academic elected a Fellow of the IEEE
A University of Bristol academic has been elected a Fellow of the world's largest and most prestigious professional association for the advancement of technology. (2015-12-01)

Artificially engineering the intestine
Short bowel syndrome is a debilitating condition with few treatment options, and these treatments have limited efficacy. (2019-09-18)

Researchers discover new cause of cell aging
New research from the USC Viterbi School of Engineering could be key to our understanding of how the aging process works. These findings potentially pave the way for better cancer treatments and revolutionary new drugs that could vastly improve human health in the twilight years. (2019-07-25)

Transient increase in blood pressure promotes some blood vessel growth
Blood vessels are the body's transportation system, carrying oxygen and nutrients to cells and whisking away waste. A research team led by a scientist at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) in Japan has discovered a mechanism by which the growth of these vessels' inner liner is stimulated, which may lead to therapeutics that could cut vessels off from tumors or help rebuild vessels in degenerative diseases. (2020-06-12)

NUS scientists develop novel chip for fast and accurate disease detection at low cost
A novel invention by a team of researchers from the National University of Singapore holds promise for a faster and cheaper way to diagnose diseases with high accuracy. Professor Zhang Yong from the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the NUS Faculty of Engineering and his team have developed a tiny microfluidic chip that could effectively detect minute amounts of biomolecules without the need for complex lab equipment. (2018-03-29)

Engineering the meniscus
Damage to the meniscus is common, but there remains an unmet need for improved restorative therapies that can overcome poor healing in the avascular regions. (2019-09-23)

Extracellular vesicles could be personalized drug delivery vehicles
Creating enough nanovesicles to inexpensively serve as a drug delivery system may be as simple as putting the cells through a sieve, according to an international team of researchers who used mouse autologous -- their own -- immune cells to create large amounts of fillable nanovesicles to deliver drugs to tumors in mice. (2018-03-12)

Study shows functional effects of human stem cell delivery to heart muscle after heart attack
Researchers delivered human stem cells seeded in biological sutures to the damaged heart muscles of rats following induced acute myocardial infarction and assessed the effects on cardiac function one week later. The differences in mechanical function at a local and global level when stem cell seeded sutures were used compared to sutures without stem cells are reported in an article in BioResearch Open Access. (2016-10-19)

Rutgers engineers 3-D print shape-shifting smart gel
Rutgers engineers have invented a '4-D printing' method for a smart gel that could lead to the development of 'living' structures in human organs and tissues, soft robots and targeted drug delivery. (2018-01-31)

Breakthrough in blood vessel engineering
Growing functional blood vessel networks is no easy task. Previously, other groups have made networks that span millimeters in size. But now, a University of Delaware team has grown a self-assembling, functional network of blood vessels across centimeter scales, a size relevant for human use. With continued development and refinement, the microfluidic system could be used to grow blood vessels for human tissue and organ transplants. (2018-12-05)

Simplifying skin disease diagnosis with topical nanotechnology
This vision of simplifying disease diagnosis using topically applied nanotechnology could change the way skin diseases such as abnormal scars are diagnosed and managed. (2018-05-18)

Engineers hack cell biology to create 3-D shapes from living tissue
Many of the complex folded shapes that form mammalian tissues can be explained with very simple instructions, UC San Francisco bioengineers report Dec. 28 in the journal Developmental Cell. By patterning mechanically active mouse or human cells to thin layers of extracellular fibers, the researchers could create bowls, coils, and ripples out of living tissue. The cells collaborated mechanically through a web of these fibers to fold themselves up in predictable ways, mimicking natural developmental stages. (2017-12-28)

Heart-muscle patches made with human cells improve heart attack recovery
Large, human cardiac-muscle patches created in the lab have been tested, for the first time, on large animals in a heart attack model. This clinically relevant approach showed that the patches significantly improved recovery from heart attack injury. The results are a step closer to the goal of treating human heart attacks by suturing cardiac-muscle patches over an area of dead heart muscle in order to reduce the pathology that often leads to heart failure. (2018-01-10)

Minimizing exposure to harmful flame retardant chemicals in waste foams and plastics
Continued research and new policies and practices to ensure proper use and disposal of foam and plastic products that contain potentially harmful flame retardant chemicals are needed to minimize health risks from environmental exposure to humans and animals. (2018-01-29)

Study finds minority trainees are up, but not minority faculty
Despite increasing numbers of underrepresented minority (URM) trainees in the biomedical sciences, there is a persistent shortage of URM faculty who are involved in basic biomedical research at medical schools. Vanderbilt investigators examined the entire training pathway of potential faculty candidates to identify points of greatest loss of URM trainees. They report Jan. 16 in PLOS ONE two key points of loss: during undergraduate education and in transition from postdoctoral fellowship to tenure-track faculty. (2018-01-17)

Bacterial outer membrane vesicles: An emerging tool in vaccine development
Outer membrane vesicles, biological nanoparticles shed during normal growth by bacteria, have seen significant recent advances in engineering and are thus finding new utility as therapeutic and drug delivery agents. One specific research focus explored recently in the literature is the use of bacterial vesicles as adjuvants in vaccine formulations. (2017-09-26)

Risk factors for prostate cancer
New research suggests that age, race and family history are the biggest risk factors for a man to develop prostate cancer, although high blood pressure, high cholesterol, vitamin D deficiency, inflammation of prostate, and vasectomy also add to the risk. In contrast, obesity, alcohol abuse, and smoking show a negative association with the disease. Details are reported in the International Journal of Medical Engineering and Informatics. (2015-09-29)

Controlling genes with light
Researchers at Duke University have demonstrated a new way to activate genes with light, allowing precisely controlled and targeted genetic studies and applications. The method might be used to activate genes in a specific location or pattern, allowing more precise study of gene function, or to create complex systems for growing tissue or new therapies. (2015-02-09)

Once revolutionary, now dominant: OCT still shows rich potential for new applications
The revolutionizing technology of optical coherence tomography (OCT) is celebrated in a special section of the Journal of Biomedical Optics, published by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics. Detailed to the microscopic scale and noninvasive, OCT yields 3-D images of tissues inside the body and is a dominant diagnostic tool in ophthalmology with potential in numerous other areas. (2018-01-10)

3-D tissue model of developing heart could help drug safety testing for pregnant women
A Syracuse University engineering team has developed a process that combines biomaterials-based cell patterning and stem cell technology to make a 3-D tissue model that could mimic early stage human heart development. Embryotoxicity is just one potential use of the modeling platform. (2018-03-16)

3-DIY: Printing your own bioprinter
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a low-cost 3-D bioprinter by modifying a standard desktop 3-D printer, and they have released the breakthrough designs as open source so that anyone can build their own system. (2018-03-27)

New guide: How science academies can support the sustainable development goals
The United Nations' 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development identified 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) whose realization will require expertise from many sectors, including science, engineering, and medicine. Supporting the Sustainable Development Goals: A Guide for Merit-Based Academies, a new publication from the InterAcademy Partnership, explains why and how academies around the globe can support the Sustainable Development Goals - for example, by providing advice to governments about implementing the goals, and by monitoring and evaluating progress toward the goals. (2017-12-06)

City College-led experts develop flood prediction model
The duration of floods can be determined by river flow, precipitation and atmospheric blocking. Now an international team of researchers led by Nasser Najibi and Naresh Devineni at The City College of New York is offering a novel physically based Bayesian network model for inference and prediction of flood duration. The model also accurately examines the timescales of flooding. (2019-07-15)

Decellularized muscle grafts support skeletal muscle regeneration to treat tissue loss
A new comparative study showed the advantages of using donor decellularized muscle to promote functional tissue regeneration at the site of bulk skeletal muscle loss due to trauma or surgery. (2018-05-04)

Artificial 'skin' gives robotic hand a sense of touch
A team of researchers from the University of Houston has reported a breakthrough in stretchable electronics that can serve as an artificial skin, allowing a robotic hand to sense the difference between hot and cold, while also offering advantages for a wide range of biomedical devices. (2017-09-13)

Novel approach to making therapeutic proteins at point of care
A novel approach to making therapeutic proteins allows medicine to be developed in a suitcase-size system. (2018-07-10)

COVID-19 and the role of tissue engineering
Tissue engineering has a unique set of tools and technologies for developing preventive strategies, diagnostics, and treatments that can play an important role during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. (2020-05-08)

New malleable 'electronic skin' self-healable, recyclable
University of Colorado Boulder researchers have developed a new type of malleable, self-healing and fully recyclable 'electronic skin' that has applications ranging from robotics and prosthetic development to better biomedical devices. (2018-02-09)

UBC engineers advance the capability of wearable tech
Creating the perfect wearable device to monitor muscle movement, heart rate and other tiny bio-signals without breaking the bank has inspired scientists to look for a simpler and more affordable tool. Now, a team of researchers at UBC's Okanagan campus have developed a practical way to monitor and interpret human motion, in what may be the missing piece of the puzzle when it comes to wearable technology. (2018-02-22)

Nanoparticles can limit inflammation by distracting the immune system
A surprise finding suggests that an injection of nanoparticles may be able to help fight the immune system when it goes haywire, researchers at the University of Michigan have shown. The nanoparticles divert immune cells that cause inflammation away from an injury site. (2017-11-08)

Scientists capture colliding organic nanoparticles on video for first time
A Northwestern University research team is the first to capture on video organic nanoparticles colliding and fusing together. This unprecedented view of 'chemistry in motion' will aid Northwestern nanoscientists developing new drug delivery methods as well as demonstrate to researchers around the globe how an emerging imaging technique opens a new window on a very tiny world. (2017-11-17)

Diabetic foot ulcers heal quickly with nitric oxide technology
Around the world, 425 million people live with diabetes and upwards of 15 percent develop foot ulcers, which increases their risk of death 2.5 times. A new nitric oxide-releasing technology has the potential to cut down the healing time of diabetic foot ulcers from 120 days to 21 days. (2018-11-13)

Financial relationships between biomedical companies and organizations
Sixty-three percent of organizations that published clinical practice guidelines on the National Guideline Clearinghouse website in 2012 reported receiving funds from biomedical companies, but these relationships were seldom disclosed in the guidelines, according to a new study published by Henry Stelfox and colleagues from the University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada, in PLOS Medicine. (2016-05-31)

Regenerating blood vessels gets $2.7 million grant
Biomedical engineers in the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin have received $2.7 million in funding to advance a treatment that regenerates blood vessels. (2016-04-26)

Empathetic people experience dogs' expressions more strongly
A study by the University of Helsinki and Aalto University explored how empathy and other psychological factors affect people's assessments of the facial images of dogs and humans. (2017-02-03)

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