Popular Biomedical Research News and Current Events

Popular Biomedical Research News and Current Events, Biomedical Research News Articles.
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Study finds minority trainees are up, but not minority faculty
Despite increasing numbers of underrepresented minority (URM) trainees in the biomedical sciences, there is a persistent shortage of URM faculty who are involved in basic biomedical research at medical schools. Vanderbilt investigators examined the entire training pathway of potential faculty candidates to identify points of greatest loss of URM trainees. They report Jan. 16 in PLOS ONE two key points of loss: during undergraduate education and in transition from postdoctoral fellowship to tenure-track faculty. (2018-01-17)

Financial relationships between biomedical companies and organizations
Sixty-three percent of organizations that published clinical practice guidelines on the National Guideline Clearinghouse website in 2012 reported receiving funds from biomedical companies, but these relationships were seldom disclosed in the guidelines, according to a new study published by Henry Stelfox and colleagues from the University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada, in PLOS Medicine. (2016-05-31)

Biomedical Engineering hosts national conference on STEM education for underserved students
The University of Akron hosts a national conference aimed at ensuring underserved students have access to opportunities in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Taking place March 8-10, 2017, the conference is expected to draw 200 K-12 teachers and academics from across the nation. Through workshops and speakers, attendees explore why participation lags among underrepresented racial, ethnic and socioeconomic students. The LeBron James Family Foundation, NASA Glenn Research Center, and Facing History will be presenters. (2017-03-03)

Cutting The Time And Cost Of Developing New Cures: Lord Sainsbury Launches World's First Biomedical Accelerator Mass Spectrometer In York
Identifying promising drugs that could lead to life saving cures in the future can take eight to ten years and cost as much as £200 million. The AMS can investigate large numbers of drugs for pharmaceutical companies, significantly speeding up drug development by quickly identifying the most promising. In some cases it may cut development time by up to six months. (1998-11-20)

Faster, more accurate cancer detection using nanoparticles, Rutgers-led study finds
Using light-emitting nanoparticles, Rutgers University-New Brunswick scientists have invented a highly effective method to detect tiny tumors and track their spread, potentially leading to earlier cancer detection and more precise treatment. (2017-12-12)

FASEB releases funding recommendations
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) released funding recommendations for five of the nation's research agencies for fiscal year (FY) 2017. The proposed funding levels are presented in the annual report. 'Federal Funding for Biomedical and Related Life Sciences Research FY 2017.' (2016-03-01)

Texas A&M team develops new way to grow blood vessels
Formation of new blood vessels, a process also known as angiogenesis, is one of the major clinical challenges in wound healing and tissue implants. To address this issue, researchers from Texas A&M University have developed a clay-based platform to deliver therapeutic proteins to the body to assist with the formation of blood vessels. (2018-08-17)

New study provides next clue to prevent dangerous episodes of low blood sugar in diabetics
A new LSU Pennington Biomedical Research Center study reveals that a novel biomarker might give us new answers necessary to creating a diagnostic tool for hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure (HAAF). No objective diagnostic tool currently exists for this condition which, if left untreated, can lead to ever-worsening and possibly life-threatening episodes of dangerously low blood sugar. (2018-08-10)

The FASEB Journal: New psoriatric arthritis mouse model developed
Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a chronic inflammatory disease that can reduce mobility and agility in patients. PsA is known to increase the risk of type II diabetes. A recent study published in The FASEB Journal tested a novel mouse model that may one day lead to therapeutic approaches or reagents for human skin pathology, as well as joint erosion and disc degeneration, that would improve quality of life for patients with PsA. (2019-06-06)

New study finds postdocs don't yield positive labor market returns
A new study by Boston University and University of Kansas researchers has found that postdoc jobs don't yield a positive return in the labor market, and that these positions likely cost graduates roughly three years worth of salary in their first 15 years of their careers. (2017-01-10)

Rutgers researchers develop automated robotic device for faster blood testing
Rutgers researchers have created an automated blood drawing and testing device that provides rapid results, potentially improving the workflow in hospitals and other health-related institutions to allow health care practitioners to spend more time treating patients. A study describing the fully automated device is published online in the journal TECHNOLOGY. (2018-06-13)

Nebraska discovery offers clues to why Zika became more dangerous
Virus with a certain sugar in its protein envelope more readily passes to the brain in infected mice, causing inflammation and death. (2017-10-04)

New review of scientific studies confirms food cravings can be reduced
Food craving, the intense desire to eat certain foods, can sabotage efforts to maintain healthy eating habits and body weight, no matter the time of year. However, an examination of 28 current peer-reviewed scientific studies largely substantiates findings that changes in diet, prescription medications, physical activity and bariatric surgery reduce craving, said Candice Myers, PhD, assistant professor - research at LSU's Pennington Biomedical Research Center. (2018-12-11)

Accounting for sex differences in biomedical research
When it comes to health, a person's sex can play a role. More women in the US have autoimmune diseases than men, for example, whereas boys are more likely to be diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder than girls. Yet biomedical research on disease and possible new treatments often studies only one sex. The cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, explores efforts to change this practice. (2017-03-22)

Dynamic DNA polymers can be reversed using biocompatible techniques
DNA-based straight and branched polymers or nanomaterials that can be created and dissolved using biocompatible methods are now possible thanks to the work of Penn State biomedical engineers. (2016-05-17)

Research team achieves first 2-color STED microscopy of living cells
Current applications of STED microscopy have been limited to single color imaging of living cells and multicolor imaging in (2011-08-17)

Maximizing biomedical research through integrated science
In this Policy Forum, Phillip Sharp, Tyler Jacks and Susan Hockfield discuss the need for better integration of engineering, physical, computational, and mathematical sciences with biomedical science, as they publish a report this week outlining key recommendations in this space. (2016-06-23)

Professor, researcher in brain machine interfaces to speak at Louisiana Tech
Louisiana Tech University's Center for Biomedical Engineering and Rehabilitation Science (CBERS) and its Consortium on Neuronal Networks in Epilepsy and Memory (NeuroNEM) will host a presentation by Dr. Jose C. Principe, Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Florida, as part of the Seminar Series on Probing and Understanding the Brain. (2017-03-13)

Blood flow measurements in microfluidic devices fabricated by a micromilling technique
The researchers show the ability of a micromilling machine to manufacture microchannels down to 30 μm and also the ability of a microfluidic device to perform partial separation of red blood cells from plasma. (2016-04-13)

Paper pumps power portable microfluidics, biomedical devices
Biomedical engineering researchers have developed inexpensive paper pumps that use capillary action to power portable microfluidic devices, opening the door to a range of biomedical tools. (2017-03-08)

Making lab-grown tissues stronger
Lab-grown tissues could one day provide new treatments for injuries and damage to the joints, including articular cartilage, tendons and ligaments. (2014-10-30)

Hydrogel paves way for biomedical breakthrough
Dubbed the ''invisibility cloak'', engineers at the University of Sydney have developed a hydrogel that allows implants and transplants to better and more safetly interact with surrounding tissue. (2020-08-03)

Researchers design superhydrophobic 'nanoflower' for biomedical applications
Plant leaves have a natural superpower -- they're designed with water repelling characteristics. Called a superhydrophobic surface, this trait allows leaves to cleanse themselves from dust particles. Inspired by such natural designs, a team of researchers at Texas A&M University has developed an innovative way to control the hydrophobicity of a surface to benefit to the biomedical field. (2019-07-02)

MARC Travel Awards Announced for ABRF 2015 Annual Meeting
FASEB MARC (Maximizing Access to Research Careers) Program has announced the travel award recipients for the Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities 2015 Annual Meeting from March 28-31, 2015, in St. Louis, Mo. (2015-02-20)

New data suggests nicotine while pregnant alters genes
A University of Houston biomedical research team is reporting that a possible cure for addiction may be found by following the pathways of significantly altered dopamine neurons in newborns who were chronically exposed to nicotine in utero. (2019-02-05)

Biomedical bleeding may impact horseshoe crabs' spawning behavior and movement
Horseshoe crabs that have undergone biomedical bleeding tend to reside in deeper water and approach mating beaches less often, according to a new study published in The Biological Bulletin. In 'Effects of the Biomedical Bleeding Process on the Behavior of the American Horseshoe Crab, Limulus polyphemus in Its Natural Habitat,' Meghan Owings and her colleagues report the results of an investigation of the behavioral and physiological effects that the bleeding process has on horseshoe crabs that are released back into their natural environment. (2019-06-20)

Researchers find fecal marker could help diagnose early signs of chronic gut conditions
Small molecules found in fecal matter could provide clues to the early inflammation found in chronic gut conditions, such as intestinal bowel disease (IBD), and serve as new biomarkers for diagnosis, according to a study led by the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University. (2019-06-27)

MARC travel awards announced for: AMP 2014 Meeting
The FASEB MARC Program has announced the travel award recipients for the AMP 2014 Annual Meeting in National Harbor, Md. These awards are meant to promote the entry of students, post doctorates and scientists from underrepresented groups into the mainstream of the basic science community and to encourage the participation of young scientists at the AMP 2014 Annual Meeting. This year MARC conferred 3 awards totaling $5,550. (2014-10-20)

$1.1 million grant funds study on why early pregnancy prevents breast cancer
Biomedical scientist Rajkumar Lakshmanaswamy, Ph.D., has received a $1.1 million research grant from the US Department of Defense (DOD) to study how early pregnancy reduces a woman's risk for breast cancer. (2017-03-06)

FSU College of Medicine researcher seeks to uncover new cancer therapies
With a four-year, $707,000 grant from the American Cancer Society, Yanchang Wang, assistant professor of biomedical sciences in the Florida State University College of Medicine, hopes to learn how a particular enzyme could possibly help put the brakes on the runaway cell division process that occurs in many forms of cancer. (2008-02-25)

Surface characteristics influence cellular growth on semiconductor material
Changing the texture and surface characteristics of a semiconductor material at the nanoscale can influence the way that neural cells grow on the material. (2014-03-12)

Cellular laser microsurgery illuminates research in vertebrate biology
Using an ultrafast femtosecond laser, researchers at Tufts University in Medford, Mass., were able to label, draw patterns on, and remove individual melanocytes cells from a species of frog tadpole (Xenopus) without damaging surrounding cells and tissues. Melanocytes are the cells responsible for skin pigment; they also are descendants of a specific type of stem cell that has regenerative potential and other characteristics similar to some cancer cells. (2011-08-17)

UK's largest charity announces increase in funding to almost £4 billion over 5 years
The Wellcome Trust, the UK's largest independent funder of medical research, today announces plans to increase its spending to almost £4 billion over the next 5 years in what is believed to be the largest ever charitable spend within the UK. (2008-02-05)

Research to restore the retina
Biologist Ann Morris, Ph.D., is the Pew Charitable Trusts' featured biomedical researcher of the month for her creative research on vision in zebrafish. (2013-02-21)

NIH grants $122 million in Institutional Development Awards
The National Center for Research Resources, part of the National Institutes of Health, announced today it will provide up to an estimated $122 million over the next five years to fund Institutional Development Award Networks of Biomedical Research Excellence in seven IDeA-eligible states. The INBRE is a component of the IDeA program, which is designed to improve the competitiveness of investigators in states that historically have not received significant levels of NIH research funding. (2009-05-05)

Public funding essential for advances in biomedical research
Article shows that publicly-funded research creates knowledge that links to private companies' efforts to develop drugs, medical devices, and other patented biomedical products. (2017-03-30)

Nano-lipid particles from edible ginger could improve drug delivery for colon cancer, study finds
Edible ginger-derived nano-lipids created from a specific population of ginger nanoparticles show promise for effectively targeting and delivering chemotherapeutic drugs used to treat colon cancer, according to a study by researchers at the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University, the Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Wenzhou Medical University and Southwest University in China. (2016-09-06)

The FASEB Journal: New strategy to reduce cancer drug's cardiotoxic effects
Doxorubicin (Doxo) is a widely used chemotherapeutic drug for cancer, though it can have toxic effects on the heart. A recent animal study published in The FASEB Journal investigated whether the cardioregulatory protein chromogranin A (CgA) contributes to the regulation of the cardiotoxic and antitumor activities of Doxo. (2019-04-11)

MARC Travel Awards announced for the ASBMR 2011 Annual meeting
FASEB MARC (Minority Access to Research Careers) Program has announced the travel award recipients for The American Society for Bone & Mineral Research (ASBMR) 2011 Annual Meeting in San Diego, Calif., from September 16-20, 2011. These awards are meant to promote the entry of underrepresented minority students, postdoctorates and scientists into the mainstream of the basic science community and to encourage the participation of young scientists at the ASBMR 2011 Annual Meeting. (2011-08-08)

Brain And Psyche: The Neurobiology Of The Self
The Whitehead Institute will hold its third annual press seminar, (1998-06-03)

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