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Popular Bird Species News and Current Events, Bird Species News Articles.
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Eating the flu
Given the importance and wide distribution of Influenza A viruses, it is surprising how little is known about infections of wild mammals. (2019-03-06)
Insect food webs
Biological diversity stabilizes species interactions. (2019-03-06)
Meet the tenrecs
Researchers reviewed the conservation priorities for the 31 species of tenrec -- a poorly understood family of small mammals superficially resembling hedgehogs, found only on the island of Madagascar. (2019-05-16)
Species on the move
A total of 55 animal species in the UK have been displaced from their natural ranges or enabled to arrive for the first time on UK shores because of climate change over the last 10 years (2008-2018) -- as revealed in a new study published today by scientists at international conservation charity ZSL (Zoological Society of London). (2019-07-18)
Good neighbors
In the animal kingdom, food access is among the biggest drivers of habitat preference. (2019-01-22)
New tool developed by UBC researchers helps conservationists make smarter decisions
A new tool developed by University of British Columbia researchers could help ensure limited conservation dollars are well spent by determining which actions would save the most species per dollar. (2018-09-15)
Bateman's cowbirds
Researchers at Illinois have discovered that cowbirds conform to Bateman's Principle, despite investing no energy into parental care. (2019-09-30)
DNA exchange among species is major contributor to diversity in Heliconius butterflies
Exchange of genetic material among species played a major role in the wide diversity of Heliconius butterflies, according to a new study, results of which inform a centuries-long debate about the value of hybridization to species evolution. (2019-10-31)
The heat is on
Climate change is reorganizing the life in our oceans in a big way: as waters warm, cold-loving species, from plankton to fish, leave the area and warm water species become more successful. (2019-11-25)
The black forest and climate change
Silver and Douglas firs could replace Norway spruce in the long run due to their greater resistance to droughts. (2017-06-30)
Sussex research reveals brain mechanism involved in language learning
Psychologists found that when we learn the names of unfamiliar objects, brain regions involved in learning actively predict the objects the names correspond to. (2018-03-15)
How human cognition can affect the spreading of diseases like Ebola
Psychologists from the University of Sydney and Texas Tech have applied science to health communication and found that the way the message is conveyed can have a significant impact on awareness about diseases, like Ebola, that jump from animals to people. (2017-11-08)
Researchers examine contaminants in hunted wildlife
Concerning environmental contaminants, game species are not subject to the same safety testing as commercially marketed livestock. (2017-08-09)
Nearly 40% of species are very rare and are vulnerable to climate change
Almost 40 percent of global flora is categorized as 'exceedingly rare,' and these species are most at risk of extinction by human development and as the climate continues to change, according to new University of Arizona-led research. (2019-11-27)
Campgrounds alter jay behavior
Anyone who's gone camping has seen birds foraging for picnic crumbs, and according to new research in The Condor: Ornithological Applications, the availability of food in campgrounds significantly alters jays' behavior and may even change how they interact with other bird species. (2016-06-29)
Life in marine driftwood: The case of driftwood specialist talitrids
The rare and difficult-to-sample driftwood talitrids, also called driftwood hoppers, are reviewed by David Wildish in the open access journal Zoosystematics and Evolution. (2017-12-20)
Study provides insights for combating devastating amphibian disease
Amphibian chytridiomycosis, caused by infection with the Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis fungus, is the most devastating vertebrate disease on record. (2017-11-14)
Celebrity fossil reveals all for science
With the help of an artist, a geology professor at Lund University in Sweden has figuratively speaking breathed life into one of science's most well-known fossil species; Agnostus pisiformis. (2017-09-15)
How to be a winner in the game of evolution
A new study by University of Arizona biologists helps explain why different groups of animals differ dramatically in their number of species, and how this is related to differences in their body forms and ways of life. (2017-01-13)
Can pollution alter wildlife behavior?
A team of scientists from the University of Portsmouth have developed new scientific tests to better understand the effects of pollution on wildlife behavior. (2018-07-27)
Paleontology: The eleventh Archaeopteryx
Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich report the first description of the geologically oldest fossil securely attributable to the genus Archaeopteryx, and provide a new diagnostic key for differentiating bird-like dinosaurs from their closest relatives. (2018-01-26)
Doubling down on DNA
The African clawed frog X. laevis genome contains two full sets of chromosomes from two extinct ancestors. (2016-10-19)
Corals in Singapore likely to survive sea-level rise: NUS study
Marine scientists from the National University of Singapore found that coral species in Singapore's sedimented and turbid waters are unlikely to be impacted by accelerating sea-level rise (2019-07-01)
Climate-influenced changes in flowering, fruiting also affect bird abundance, activities
A new study has documented shifts in Hawaiian bird abundance, breeding and molting based on climate-related changes to native vegetation. (2017-11-08)
Young birds suffer in the city
City life is tough for young birds. But if they survive their first year, they are less susceptible to the effects of stress, according to research from Lund University in Sweden. (2017-09-08)
Fast evolution affects everyone, everywhere
Rapid evolution of other species happens all around us all the time -- and many of the most extreme examples are associated with human influences. (2016-12-05)
Passenger pigeon case study: How even large, stable populations may be at risk for extinction
A new study on passenger pigeon (Ectopistes migratorius) genomics suggests that even species with large and stable populations can be at risk of extinction if there's a sudden environmental change. (2017-11-16)
Conservationists find birds in central African rain forest are facing major threats from bushmeat hunting
In a new study released this month, conservationists are sounding the alarm about a growing hunting crisis plaguing rainforests in central Africa. (2018-03-06)
Monitor climate change, not predators, to protect lake diversity: Study
Climate change and other environmental factors are more threatening to fish diversity than predators, according to new research from the University of Guelph. (2018-03-23)
Mechanisms explaining positional diversity of the hindlimb in tetrapod evolution
Elucidating how body parts in their earliest recognizable form are assembled in tetrapods during development is essential for understanding the nature of morphological evolution. (2017-08-18)
Animal images used in marketing may skew public perception about their survival risks
Many of the world's most charismatic animal species -- those that attract the largest interest and deepest empathy from the public -- are at high risk of extinction in part because many people believe their iconic stature guarantees their survival. (2018-04-12)
In communicating wildlife conservation, focus on the right message
If you want people to care about endangered species, focus on how many animals are left, not on the chances of a species becoming extinct, according to a new study by Cornell University communication scholars. (2016-10-31)
New 3D imaging and visualization technique provides detailed views of muscle architecture
In a new study, scientists in pathology and anatomical sciences in the University of Missouri's School of Medicine have revealed a three-dimensional view of the skeletal muscles responsible for flight in a European starling. (2019-04-30)
Prairie-chicken nests appear unaffected by wind energy facility
Wind energy development in the Great Plains is increasing, spurring concern about its potential effects on grassland birds, the most rapidly declining avian group in North America. (2017-08-09)
How do people choose what plants to use?
There are about 400,000 species of plants in the world. (2017-01-23)
Targeted conservation could protect more of Earth's biodiversity
A new study finds that major gains in global biodiversity can be achieved if an additional 5 percent of land is set aside to protect key species. (2017-05-25)
Researchers describe first-ever hybrid bird species from the Amazon
A team of U of T Scarborough researchers have described the first known hybrid bird species to be found in the Amazon rainforest. (2017-12-25)
Birds become immune to influenza
An influenza infection in birds gives a good protection against other subtypes of the virus, like a natural vaccination, according to a new study. (2017-06-30)
Shifting bird distribution indicates a changing Arctic
Shifts in the distribution of Spectacled Eiders, a predatory bird at the top of the Bering Sea's benthic food web, indicate possible changes in the Arctic's marine ecosystem, according to new research in The Condor: Ornithological Applications. (2016-06-01)
A stinging report: FSU reserach shows climate change a major threat to bumble bees
New research from a team of Florida State University scientists and their collaborators is helping to explain the link between a changing global climate and a dramatic decline in bumble bee populations worldwide. (2017-09-29)
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