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Targeting breast cancer through precision medicine
University of Alberta researchers have discovered a mechanism that may make cancer cells more susceptible to treatment. The research team found that the protein RYBP prevents DNA repair in cancer cells, including breast cancer. (2018-01-09)

The dilemma of screening for prostate cancer
Primary care providers are put in a difficult position when screening their male patients for prostate cancer -- some guidelines suggest that testing the general population lacks evidence whereas others state that it is appropriate in certain patients. Now a new perspective piece offers some guidance on when to screen patients and how to involve them in decisions about screening and treatment. (2015-10-14)

Spinal cord injury research: Bonus benefit to activity-based training
Researchers in the Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center (KSCIRC) at the University of Louisville have discovered that the training, designed to help individuals with SCI improve motor function, also leads to improved bladder and bowel function and increased sexual desire. (2018-01-31)

Researchers reveal new mechanism to 'activate' the immune system against cancer
A new mechanism for activating the immune system against cancer cells allows immune cells to detect and destroy cancer cells better than before, and most effectively in lung cancer and melanoma. (2019-01-04)

The Lancet Infectious Diseases: Oldest ever schistosomiasis egg found may be first proof of early human technology exacerbating disease burden
The discovery of a schistosomiasis parasite egg in a 6200-year-old grave at a prehistoric town by the Euphrates river in Syria may be the first evidence that agricultural irrigation systems in the Middle East contributed to disease burden, according to new Correspondence published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases. (2014-06-19)

Major study shows x5 greater suicide rate in patients with urological cancers
Patients with urological cancer such as prostate, bladder or kidney cancer are five times more likely to commit suicide than people without cancer. The analysis also shows that cancer patients generally are around three times more likely to commit suicide than the general population, and that the proportion of attempted suicides which result in a completed or successful suicide was higher in cancer patients, with a higher proportion still in patients with urological cancers. (2018-03-15)

Tapeworm drug fights prostate cancer
A medicine against parasites contains a substance that kills prostate and colon cancer. (2017-11-15)

Decline in colorectal cancer deaths in Europe is a 'major success' story
The decline in cancer of the intestines -- colorectal cancer -- is one of the major success stories of the past 30 years in Europe say researchers, as they predict that in 2018 death rates from the disease will continue to fall by around 7 percent compared to 2012. In a study published in the leading cancer journal Annals of Oncology, researchers predict that death rates in the European Union for most cancers will continue to fall this year, compared to 2012. (2018-03-18)

New colon cancer finding could lead to earlier diagnosis -- and better outcomes
For many years, physicians have puzzled over why people with 'clean' colonoscopies went on to develop colon cancer. New findings from OMRF may help explain why, and the discovery could lead to ways to detect these cancers earlier and more effectively. (2018-03-28)

New findings concerning hereditary prostate cancer
For the first time ever, researchers have differentiated the risks of developing indolent or aggressive prostate cancer in men with a family history of the disease. Researchers from the Swedish universities of Lund, Uppsala and Umeå now present new and somewhat surprising results. (2016-07-11)

New prostate cancer risk score could help guide screening decisions
A new score for predicting a man's genetic risk of developing aggressive prostate cancer could help guide decisions about who to screen and when, say researchers in The BMJ today. (2018-01-10)

Release of the cancer incidence and survival statistics for Northern Ireland 2012-2016
The Queen's University N. Ireland Cancer Registry (NICR) today released the number of new cancer cases diagnosed (incidence) in Northern Ireland in 2016. (2018-03-22)

Three in 4 don't know obesity causes cancer
Three out of four (75 percent) people in the UK are unaware of the link between obesity and cancer, according to a new Cancer Research UK report published today. (2016-09-08)

'Lipofilling' technique found safe for reconstruction after breast cancer surgery
Autologous fat transfer, also known as 'lipofilling,' is a minimally invasive procedure in which the plastic surgeon uses the patient's own fat obtained by liposuction to perform breast reconstruction. (2018-06-06)

Risk factors for prostate cancer
New research suggests that age, race and family history are the biggest risk factors for a man to develop prostate cancer, although high blood pressure, high cholesterol, vitamin D deficiency, inflammation of prostate, and vasectomy also add to the risk. In contrast, obesity, alcohol abuse, and smoking show a negative association with the disease. Details are reported in the International Journal of Medical Engineering and Informatics. (2015-09-29)

Increase in lifestyle-related cancers over past decade spotlights need for prevention
Lifestyle-related cancers, such as lung, colorectal, and skin cancers, have increased globally over the past decade, according to the most comprehensive analysis of cancer-related health outcomes and patterns ever conducted. (2018-06-02)

Young cancer survivors have twice the risk of suicide
Survivors of cancer diagnosed before the age of 25 had a more than two-fold increased risk of suicide compared to their non-cancer peers. (2016-11-30)

Screening has had 'little impact' on falling breast cancer deaths in the Netherlands
Breast screening in the Netherlands seems to have had a marginal effect on breast cancer mortality over the past 24 years, suggests research in The BMJ today. (2017-12-05)

New receptor genes turn T-cells into powerful liver cancer foes
Mouse genes that make human T cells powerful at fighting liver cancer could one day help patients do the same, scientists report. Georgia Cancer Center scientists exposed mice genetically manipulated to respond to human antigens to a common antigen found in human liver cancer. (2018-04-03)

Research test identifies BRCA2 gene mutations that lead to breast, ovarian cancers
A new test developed by researchers at Mayo Clinic shows which mutations in the BRCA2 gene make women susceptible to developing breast or ovarian cancers. The research behind the test was published today in the American Journal of Human Genetics. (2018-01-25)

Hedgehog signaling proteins keep cancer stem cells alive
Researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have discovered that the survival of cancer stem cells is dependent on the 'Hedgehog signaling pathway'. Targeting this pathway had previously shown no effect on the growth of colorectal cancer. Now, Charité scientists have demonstrated that using different drugs to target a specific aspect of the pathway may yield better treatment outcomes for patients. Results from this research have been published in the journal Cell Reports*. (2018-01-19)

Tumor-dwelling immune cells thwart cancer immunotherapy
Researchers have caught tumor-associated immune cells called macrophages in the act of stealing checkpoint inhibitor antibodies away from their intended T cell targets, and blocking this thievery led to improved therapeutic responses in tumor-bearing mice. (2017-05-10)

UV light improving chances of fighting cancer
Scientists at Newcastle University have developed a cancer fighting technology which uses UV light to activate antibodies which very specifically attack tumours. (2007-10-30)

Study finds breast and ovarian cancer may have similar origins
While breast cancer is the most common cause of cancer death in women worldwide, ovarian cancer also is a significant source of mortality as the fifth leading cause of cancer death among women. These facts reflect the continued need for further understanding and innovation in cancer treatment. A new study published in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences, describes a new concept of how these two cancers may evolve in a similar way and may eventually lead to more effective therapies for both. (2016-05-23)

Undergraduate student uncovers genes associated with aggressive form of brain cancer
Using publicly available data and novel computer software called KINC, an undergraduate researcher in genetics and biochemistry at Clemson University was able to uncover a group of 22 genes that are implicated together as having involvement in glioblastoma, the most aggressive type of brain cancer. (2018-02-08)

Exposure to common THM levels in drinking water not associated with breast cancer
Exposure to trihalomethanes (THMs) in residential water is not associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. (2018-02-26)

Creation of synthetic horsepox virus could lead to more effective smallpox vaccine
UAlberta researchers created a new synthetic virus that could lead to the development of a more effective vaccine against smallpox. The discovery demonstrates how techniques based on the use of synthetic DNA can be used to advance public health measures. (2018-01-19)

Higher-dose RT lowers risk of recurrence but does not improve survival for men with prostate cancer
Results of a recent NRG Oncology study, NRG Oncology/RTOG 0126, show that high-dose radiotherapy did not improve survival for men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer but did improve biochemical control and rates of distant metastases, when compared to standard radiotherapy. Men who received higher-dose radiotherapy underwent fewer salvage therapies to control tumors that had grown larger or had spread to another body site; however, they also experienced more side effects than did men on the standard radiotherapy treatment arm. (2018-03-23)

Gene-based test for urine detects, monitors bladder cancer
Researchers at The Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have developed a test for urine, gathered during a routine procedure, to detect DNA mutations identified with urothelial cancers. (2018-03-22)

Insurance linked to black-white survival disparities in colorectal cancer
Health insurance coverage differences account for nearly one-half of the black-white survival disparity in colorectal cancer patients, according to a new study. (2017-11-14)

Breast cancer detected in transmen undergoing mastectomy
The number of transmen seeking gender-confirming surgery has risen in the past decade. (2018-04-05)

Complementary medicine for cancer can decrease survival
People who received complementary therapy for curable cancers were more likely to refuse at least one component of their conventional cancer treatment, and were more likely to die as a result, according to researchers from Yale Cancer Center and the Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy and Effectiveness Research Center (COPPER) at Yale School of Medicine. The findings were reported today online in JAMA Oncology. (2018-07-19)

Genetic predictors of esophageal cancer identified
Researchers have identified 11 genotypes that may increase esophageal cancer risk, according to research published in the November issue of Cancer Prevention Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. (2008-11-05)

Smokers might benefit from earlier colon cancer screening
New evidence suggests screening for colorectal cancer, which is now recommended to begin at age 50 for most people, should start five to 10 years earlier for individuals with a significant lifetime exposure to tobacco smoke, a University of Rochester Medical Center study said. (2008-02-13)

CNIO researchers describe new functions of protein that plays key role in some tumors and rare diseases
Cohesin is a protein complex that plays a key role in cell division; its role in 3D genome structure was described in recent years. Researchers at CNIO have found new functions in the peculiar 3D genome structure of mouse embryonic stem cells. Research on cohesin will help understand how its malfunction contributes to tumorigenesis in some types of cancer, as well as to rare diseases such as Cornelia de Lange syndrome (2019-06-18)

Just hours apart, 2 brothers undergo robotic prostate cancer surgery
Two brothers from Savannah, Georgia diagnosed with prostate cancer flew to The Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York to have lifesaving surgery on the same day this week. Dr. David B. Samadi, MD, Chief of Robotics and Minimally Invasive Surgery in the Department of Urology at Mount Sinai successfully performed the robotic prostate cancer surgeries on the siblings one after another on Monday, Jan. 14, 2008. (2008-01-17)

Antibiotics can inhibit skin lymphoma
New research from the LEO Foundation Skin Immunology Research Center at the University of Copenhagen shows, surprisingly, that antibiotics inhibit cancer in the skin in patients with rare type of lymphoma. (2019-07-25)

Particulate air pollution linked to poor survival in liver cancer patients
In a recent study, exposure to particulate air pollution after being diagnosed with liver cancer was significantly associated with an increased risk of premature death. (2017-06-07)

Limiting tumors' ability to hide from the immune system
Scientists have discovered a way to stop tumors from shedding certain proteins that the immune system uses to identify and attack tumors. (2018-03-29)

New focus on where heart disease and breast cancer treatment meet
The American Heart Association has released the first scientific statement about heart disease and breast cancer, calling for more research and collaboration between the fields of oncology and cardiology to treat and prevent both diseases. (2018-02-01)

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