Popular Blind News and Current Events

Popular Blind News and Current Events, Blind News Articles.
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Identifying artificial intelligence 'blind spots'
A novel model developed by MIT and Microsoft researchers identifies instances in which autonomous systems have 'learned' from training examples that don't match what's actually happening in the real world. Engineers could use this model to improve the safety of artificial intelligence systems, such as driverless vehicles and autonomous robots. (2019-01-24)

The Lancet journals: Papers at ERS Congress 2019
The following papers will be presented at the ERS Congress 2019, organised by the European Respiratory Society, in Madrid and published simultaneously in either The Lancet or The Lancet Respiratory Medicine journals. All papers are under embargo until the stated time. Contact details for corresponding authors are provided in the Articles and linked Comments. Funding information is listed on the first page of each Article. (2019-09-30)

For blind gamers, equal access to racing video games
Computer Scientist Brian A. Smith has developed the RAD -- a racing auditory display -- to enable visually impaired gamers play the same types of racing games that sighted players play with the same speed, control, and excitement as sighted players. Developers can integrate the audio-based interface, which a player can listen to using a standard pair of headphones, into almost any racing video game, making a popular genre of games equally accessible to people who are blind. (2018-03-06)

Clinical trial shows therapeutic HIV vaccination doesn't lead to viral suppression
A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial found no benefit for a therapeutic HIV vaccine, but could offer researchers much needed insights for future cure efforts. (2017-12-06)

A brain mechanism underlying 'vision' in the blind is revealed
Researchers observed slow spontaneous fluctuations in the brain's visual centers that preceded visual hallucinations in blind people. (2021-01-07)

Retraining the brain to see after stroke
A new study out today in Neurology, provides the first evidence that rigorous visual training restores rudimentary sight in patients who went partially blind after suffering a stroke, while patients who did not train continued to get progressively worse. (2017-04-12)

Brain's 'sixth sense' for calories discovered
The brain can sense the calories in food, independent of the taste mechanism, researchers have found in studies with mice. Their finding that the brain's reward system is switched on by this (2008-03-26)

Toilet-to-tap: Gross to think about, but how does it taste?
Researchers at University of California, Riverside, asked 143 people to express a preference among recycled water, bottled water, and tap water. They hypothesized that all three would score similarly. In fact, tap water was the least popular among the tasters; recycled water and bottled water scored about the same. (2018-03-13)

New pain treatment tested in humans
Nerve growth factor signals through receptors of the tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk) family, and research in animals has shown that inhibitors of Trks A, B, and C can reduce pain. (2017-11-27)

Successful insomnia treatment may require nothing more than a placebo
A new study published in Brain indicates that successful treatment for insomnia may not actually require complicated neurofeedback (direct training of brain functions). Rather, it appears patients who simply believe they're getting neurofeedback training appear to get the same benefits. (2017-02-21)

Mobile application detecting atrial fibrillation reduces the risk of stroke
A new application developed at the University of Turku, Finland, can detect atrial fibrillation that causes strokes. Atrial fibrillation can be detected with the mobile phone application without any extra equipment. The mobile application can save lives all over the world as timely diagnosis of atrial fibrillation is crucial for effective stroke prevention. (2018-03-16)

New discovery offers hope of protecting premature babies from blindness
Now there is hope of a new way to protect extremely premature babies from impaired vision or blindness resulting from the eye disease retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). A study at Sahlgrenska Academy published in JAMA Ophthalmology points to a clear link between ROP and low levels of the fatty acid arachidonic acid, measured in children's blood. (2018-02-09)

Seeing and avoiding the 'blind spot' in atomic force measurements
Researchers have discovered a 'blind spot' in atomic force microscopy -- a powerful tool capable of measuring the force between two atoms, imaging the structure of individual cells and the motion of biomolecules. (2018-12-07)

Virtual contact lenses for radar satellites
Radar satellites supply the data used to map sea level and ocean currents. However, up until now the radar's 'eyes' have been blind where the oceans are covered by ice. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now developed a new analysis method to solve this problem. (2018-04-16)

Screen reader plus keyboard helps blind, low-vision users browse modern webpages
By using a keyboard for tactile feedback in combination with a screen reader, users were three times more successful at navigating complex modern webpages, like they would encounter in a typical Airbnb booking site. (2018-04-18)

Scientists from the University of Granada debunk the effectiveness of glasses for colorblind people
The EnChroma® glasses, commercialized by a North American company, do not improve color vision for color blind people or correct their color blindness, and their effect is similar to that of other glasses such as the ones used for hunting. (2018-10-26)

A comparison between quetiapine and aripiprazole for treatment of schizophrenia
Schizophrenia is a common cause of incapacity and is ranked as the third most disabling illness subsequent to dementia and quadriplegia. Nearly 75 percent of persons with schizophrenia have continuing problems with recurrent psychotic episodes. (2016-07-13)

Supplementary approach to malaria
Could a simple vitamin A and zinc supplement help protect young children from malaria? A randomized double blind trial reported in the open access publication, Nutrition Journal, would suggest the answer is yes. (2008-02-05)

Brain-computer interface advances improve prosthetics, therapies
Advances in connecting neural stimulation to physical control of the body are transforming the development of prosthetics and therapeutic training for people with disabilities, according to new research. The findings were presented at Neuroscience 2018, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health. (2018-11-06)

Investigational cream may help patients with inflammatory skin disease
A study published in the British Journal of Dermatology indicates that an investigational nonsteroidal topical cream (PAC-14028) may be effective for treating atopic dermatitis, one of the most common inflammatory skin diseases. (2019-01-09)

Organic printing inks may restore sight to blind people
A simple retinal prosthesis is being developed in collaboration between Tel Aviv University in Israel and Linköping University in Sweden. Fabricated using cheap and widely-available organic pigments used in printing inks and cosmetics, it consists of tiny pixels like a digital camera sensor on a nanometric scale. Researchers hope that it can restore sight to blind people. (2018-05-02)

UAB-led study shows drug effectiveness in reducing glucocorticoid-induced bone loss
About one in every 100 people in the world takes glucocorticoids long term to treat immune-mediated diseases. However, glucocorticoids, such as prednisone, have a side effect -- they induce glucocorticoid-induced bone loss, causing an estimated yearly bone fracture rate of 5 percent. An alternative treatment option to the standard treatment now appears promising, according to an international study. Researchers compared the monoclonal antibody denosumab against a standard bisphosphonate. (2018-04-27)

Can medical marijuana help treat intractable epilepsy?
A new British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology review examines the potential of medicinal cannabis -- or medical marijuana -- for helping patients with intractable epilepsy, in which seizures fail to come under control with standard anticonvulsant treatment. (2018-08-08)

Compound derived from marijuana may benefit children with epilepsy
In recent years, cannabinoids -- the active chemicals in medical marijuana -- have been increasingly touted as a potential treatment for a range of neurological and psychiatric disorders. In a Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology review, investigators compare their efficacy with antiepileptic drugs for children with epilepsy. (2018-11-07)

Tiger Beetles Go Blind At High Speeds
Entomologists have long noticed that tiger beetles stop-and- go in their pursuit of prey. But up to now, scientists have had no idea why this species of beetle attacks its food in fits and starts. Why do they stop and go? During hot pursuit of prey, the tiger beetles go blind. (1998-01-16)

Noninvasive tinnitus treatment turns volume down on phantom noises
Scientists have devised a noninvasive approach to offer relief from tinnitus -- a persistent phantom perception of sound that afflicts as many as 15 percent of people in the United States. (2018-01-03)

New drug for non-small cell lung cancer shows efficacy
A new anti-cancer agent designed to block the signals responsible for telling cancer cells to grow has shown promising results for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer. (2003-10-21)

Study finds that overweight people really are big-boned
One of the blind spots in forensic science, particularly in identifying unknown remains, is the inability of experts to determine how much an individual weighed based on his or her skeleton. New research from North Carolina State University moves us closer to solving this problem by giving forensic experts valuable insight into what the shape of the femur can tell us about the weight of an individual. (2011-03-22)

Sound waves reveal diamond cache deep in Earth's interior
Sound waves reveal a surprisingly large diamond cache deep in Earth's interior, an international team including MIT researchers reports. (2018-07-16)

Clinical trials with nonblinded outcome assessors have high observer bias
A new study of randomized clinical trials found significant observer bias toward a more beneficial treatment effect in nonblinded trials when the researcher knew the treatment being given to the participant. The study is published in CMAJ. (2013-01-28)

Gene therapy shows promise for reversing blindness
Most causes of untreatable blindness occur due to loss of the millions of light sensitive photoreceptor cells that line the retina, similar to the pixels in a digital camera. (2017-10-02)

Pimavanserin: Relief from psychosis in dementia, without devastating side-effects
New research led by the University of Exeter Medical School, and published today in Lancet Neurology found that pimavanserin significantly improves psychosis symptoms in people with the condition, without the devastating side-effects of currently used antipsychotics. The research found an even greater benefit in those with the most severe psychotic symptoms. (2018-02-13)

The Lancet journals: Papers at American Diabetes Association (ADA) 2019
The following papers will be presented at the ADA conference in San Francisco and published simultaneously in either The Lancet or The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journals. All papers are under embargo until the stated time. Contact details for corresponding authors are provided in the Articles and linked Comments. Funding information is listed on the first page of each Article. (2019-06-09)

Febuxostat prevents gout flares in recent clinical trial
As reported in the journal Arthritis & Rheumatology, the drug febuxostat reduced gout flares in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 314 adults with early gout. (2017-10-04)

How the brain reacts to loss of vision
If mice lose their vision immediately after birth due to a genetic defect, this has a considerable impact, both on the organisation of the cerebral cortex and on memory ability. Researchers demonstrated that, in the months after blindness emerged, the density of neurotransmitter receptors that regulate excitation balance and are required for memory encoding was altered in all areas of the cortex that process sensory information. Furthermore, the hippocampus, a brain region that plays a crucial role in memory processes, was profoundly affected. (2018-12-19)

Prevalence of visual impairment, blindness expected to increase in US
An aging Baby Boomer population in the US will contribute to an expected doubling of the prevalence of visual impairment and blindness in the next 35 years, according to a study published online by JAMA Ophthalmology. (2016-05-19)

Duration of RBC storage does not affect short-term pulmonary, immunologic, or coagulation status
There is no difference in early measures of pulmonary function, immunologic status or coagulation status after fresh versus standard issue single-unit red blood cell transfusion, according to a new study from the Mayo Clinic. (2012-01-20)

Exploring the potential of human echolocation
People who are visually impaired will often use a cane to feel out their surroundings. With training and practice, people can learn to use the pitch, loudness and timbre of echoes from the cane or other sounds to navigate safely through the environment using echolocation. Bo Schenkman, from KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden, will present a summary of some aspects of his work on human echolocation during Acoustics '17 Boston. (2017-06-25)

Facial expressions of emotion are innate, not learned, says new study
Facial expressions of emotion are hardwired into our genes, according to a study published today in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. The research suggests that facial expressions of emotion are innate rather than a product of cultural learning. (2008-12-29)

Restoring vision by gene therapy
Latest scientific findings give hope for people with incurable retinal degeneration. (2020-06-04)

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