Popular Blood Cancer News and Current Events | Page 25

Popular Blood Cancer News and Current Events, Blood Cancer News Articles.
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Detecting esophageal cancer cells
Researchers at the University of Texas at Arlington's College of Nursing and Health Innovation have developed a new nanoparticle-based platform for simultaneous imaging and treatment of esophageal cancer. (2018-07-05)

Drug designed to boost radiotherapy for hard-to-treat cancers taken safely by patients
A new drug designed to make radiotherapy more effective in treating cancer has been given to patients while they are receiving radiation and shown to be safe, according to research presented at the 30th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics in Dublin, Ireland. (2018-11-13)

Biopsy alternative: 'Wearable' device captures cancer cells from blood
A prototype wearable device, tested in animal models, can continuously collect live cancer cells directly from a patient's blood. Developed by a team of engineers and doctors at the University of Michigan, it could help doctors diagnose and treat cancer more effectively. (2019-04-01)

Cancer patients are at higher risk of dying from heart disease and stroke
The largest and most comprehensive study looking at deaths from cardiovascular disease among patients with 28 types of cancer with over 40 years of data has shown that more than one in ten cancer patients do not die from their cancer but from heart and blood vessel problems instead. The paper and accompanying editorial are published in the European Heart Journal. (2019-11-24)

New CAR-T target yields promising results for multiple myeloma
In research published today in the journal Nature Communications, Utah-based scientists describe a novel way to treat cancers using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy. Laboratory tests using mouse models and tumor cells from patients displayed promising results for this novel cellular immunotherapy for multiple myeloma and other types of blood cancer. (2020-02-07)

Scientists isolate cancer stem cells
Cancer prevention researchers have discovered a protein marker that allows them to isolate cancer stem cells from regular cancer cells. By targeting this marker, scientists are developing new drugs to kill the stem cells and stop cancer from returning. (2008-09-11)

Landmark CAR-T cancer study published in the New England Journal of Medicine
Loyola University Medical Center is the only Chicago center that participated in the pivotal clinical trial of a groundbreaking cancer treatment that genetically engineers a patient's immune system to attack cancer cells. (2017-12-10)

Starving leukemia cells by targeting amino acids
Eliminating ASCT2 selectively stops the growth of leukemia cells, while having limited effects on healthy blood cells and hematopoetic (blood-forming) stem cells. (2019-03-12)

Risk prediction model may help determine if a lung nodule will progress to cancer
A risk prediction model developed using clinical and radiological features could stratify individuals presenting with a lung nodule as having high or low risk for lung cancer. (2019-06-27)

New analysis method for predicting the risks and effects of immunotherapy
In a new study, researchers at Uppsala University have been able to show differences in how Rituximab, a monoclonal antibody drug, interacts with the blood of healthy individuals compared to patients with chronic lymphatic leukaemia. This has awakened hopes that this analysis method could pave the way for important breakthroughs in immunotherapy research and treatment. (2020-12-11)

Immune system important in fight against stomach cancer
Researchers have identified cells in the immune system that react to the stomach ulcer bacterium Helicobacter pylori, one of the risk factors for the development of stomach cancer. This discovery could lead to faster diagnosis and treatment as well as a better prognosis for patients with stomach cancer, reveals a thesis from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. (2010-06-28)

Scientists discover how body fights to control spread of cancer
Scientists at the University of Liverpool have found how two molecules fight in the blood to control the spread of cancer cells. (2007-01-08)

Flavored electronic cigarettes linked to possible cardiovascular disease
Could flavored electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) cause bodily harm? There has been a rapid rise in e-cigarette use, partially due to flavoring additives in tobacco products and perception of less harm than traditional combustible cigarettes. Numerous studies have been done on the risks of e-cigarettes to lungs, but the risk to blood vessels and how flavorings can affect the body are largely unknown. (2018-06-14)

CAR-T immunotherapies may have a new player
Emerging CAR-T immunotherapies leverage modified versions of patient's T-cells to target and kill cancer cells. In a new study, published June 28 online in Cell Stem Cell, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and University of Minnesota report that similarly modified natural killer (NK) cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) also displayed heightened activity against a mouse model of ovarian cancer. (2018-06-28)

Mesothelin-targeted CAR T-cell therapy shows early promise in patients with solid tumors
A chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy that targets the protein mesothelin showed no evidence of major toxicity and had antitumor activity in patients with malignant pleural disease from mesothelioma, according to results from a phase I clinical trial presented at the AACR Annual Meeting 2019, March 29-April 3. (2019-03-31)

Discovery shows how difficult-to-treat prostate cancer evades immune system
Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have discovered how an aggressive form of prostate cancer called double-negative prostate cancer (DNPC) metastasizes by evading the the immune system. The investigators also reported on the pre-clinical development of a new therapy, which, when given in combination with existing immunotherapies, appears to stop and even reverse metastasis in mouse models. (2019-07-18)

High fiber, yogurt diet associated with lower lung cancer risk
A diet high in fiber and yogurt is associated with a reduced risk for lung cancer, according to a study by Vanderbilt University Medical Center researchers published in JAMA Oncology. (2019-10-25)

Brain tumour research could help future precision medicine
New research on brain tumours could improve patient diagnosis and treatment options as part of a precision medicine approach. Brain tumours are the leading cause of cancer deaths in children and adults under the age of 40, with 16,000* people in the UK diagnosed with a brain tumour each year. (2020-01-07)

Study finds hormone therapy in transgender adults safe
In the most comprehensive review to date addressing the relative safety of hormone therapy for transgender persons, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine have found that hormone therapy in transgender adults is safe. The findings, which appear in the Journal of Clinical and Translational Endocrinology, may help reduce the barriers for transgender individuals to receive medical care. (2015-02-24)

Faults in newly discovered breast stem cells may lead to tumours
Victorian Breast Cancer Research Consortium scientists from The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute, using a mouse model, have discovered the rare stem cell that drives the formation of all breast tissue. This discovery lays an important foundation for understanding how normal breast tissue develops. The identification of the breast stem cell is also likely to provide clues about how breast cancer develops and how rogue cells evade current therapies. (2006-01-04)

Oral drug treatment helps protect cancer patients from potentially deadly blood clots
Research from the University of Warwick indicates that taking a tablet a day can help treat cancer patients of a potentially deadly condition. (2018-05-11)

A universal DNA nano-signature for cancer
Researchers from the University of Queensland's Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (AIBN) have discovered a unique nano-scaled DNA signature that appears to be common to all cancers. Based on this discovery, the team has developed a novel technology that enables cancer to be quickly and easily detected from any tissue type, e.g. blood or biopsy. (2018-12-04)

Obesity affects prostate cancer test results
University of Adelaide research shows that the results of the most widely used test for prostate cancer may be affected by obesity. (2018-07-05)

NUS study: Nanoparticles may promote cancer metastasis
Researchers from the National University of Singapore have found that cancer nanomedicine, which are designed to kill cancer cells, may accelerate metastasis. Using breast cancer as a model, they discovered that common nanoparticles made from gold, titanium dioxide, silver and silicon dioxide -- found in processed food, consumer products, and also used in nanomedicines -- widen the gap between blood vessel cells, making it easier for other cells, such as cancer cells, to go in and out of 'leaky' blood vessels. (2019-01-31)

Some patients with imminently fatal cancer still receive treatment
Patients who died within one month of being newly diagnosed with metastatic cancer in the United States received ineffective surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, and hormonal therapy. (2019-04-15)

Self-monitoring of blood glucose
Diabetes patients should always control their own blood sugar values if this leads to improvements in their treatment. This is the view advocated by Michael Nauck of the Bad Lauterberg Diabetes Center and his coauthors in the current issue of Deutsches Arzteblatt International, who discuss sensible approaches to blood glucose self-monitoring. (2009-09-29)

Heart failure is as 'malignant' as some common cancers
A new analysis finds that, despite advances in care, men and women with a diagnosis of heart failure continue to have worse survival rates than patients with certain common cancers. (2017-05-04)

Post-biotics may help shield obese from diabetes
It was previously thought that bacteria only caused problems such as higher inflammation and higher blood glucose. But this is only half of the story. The researchers discovered that a specific component of bacteria actually lowers blood glucose and allows insulin to work better during obesity. (2017-04-20)

Study shows how H. pylori causes white blood cells to morph
Veterans Affairs researchers and colleagues in Iowa showed in a lab study how neutrophils -- the most prevalent type of white blood cell -- undergo changes when infected by the common pathogen H. pylori. The team is the first to demonstrate such changes in cells isolated from human blood. (2017-03-09)

New genetic marker could help diagnose aggressive prostate cancer
Scientists have discovered a link between certain genetic mutations, the aggressiveness of prostate cancer, risk of developing the disease and poorer survival rates of patients. The gene, called ANO7, could play a vital role in improving diagnosis of prostate cancer patients. There are over 50,000 new cases and 11,000 deaths from prostate cancer each year in the UK. (2018-08-30)

Scientists discover 'switch' that helps breast cancer spread around the body
Researchers have unveiled clues into how breast cancer cells spread around the body. (2019-05-30)

Clinical study results using Aldagen's product to isolate cord blood stem cells presented at ASH
Interim data from a clinical trial using Aldagen's product, ALDESORT to isolate stem cells from cord blood was presented at the 48th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology demonstrating improved safety and efficacy when using ALDESORT compared to the COBLT control group. The trial is being conducted by Joanne Kurtzberg, M.D., the Duke University physician who pioneered the use of umbilical cord blood as treatment for fatal childhood cancers and genetic diseases. (2006-12-11)

Drug therapy reduces neuroblastoma tumor growth in pre-clinical investigation
Researchers from the Children's Cancer Hospital at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center have discovered a new drug combination that significantly hinders tumor growth in neuroblastoma, a childhood cancer. The study was presented today at the 22nd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology. (2009-04-24)

UTA study says zinc can halt the growth of cancer cells
Zinc supplements can significantly inhibit the proliferation of esophageal cancer cells, according to a new study co-authored by a University of Texas at Arlington researcher. (2017-09-28)

How low is too low? Study highlights serious risks for intensive blood pressure control
Kaiser Permanente research published today in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found if patients with hypertension taking prescribed medications experience unusually low blood pressures -- systolic blood pressure under 110mmHg -- they are twice as likely to experience a fall or faint as patients whose treated blood pressure remains 110mmHg and above. (2018-08-24)

Novel technique can potentially improve success of ovarian cancer treatment, study reveals
This study is the first to investigate the impact of establishing a healthy blood supply to the tumour prior to treatment in mice models with an advanced stage of ovarian cancer. The researcher found this novel technique provides a clear pathway for treatment improving its success. This is opposite to a current approach that involves destroying the blood supply in an effort to starve the tumour. (2018-10-30)

New study shows cost effectiveness of early cancer surveillance
New research published today in the journal Pediatric Blood and Cancer shows how early cancer screening and surveillance in patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) results in additional years of life, and is cost effective for third-party payers. (2019-02-04)

U of Minnesota study finds thalidomide shows promise for treatment of recurrent ovarian cancer
Thalidomide, a drug blamed in the 1950s for causing birth defects, is now showing promise as a safe and effective treatment for women with recurrent ovarian cancer, according to a study led by a University of Minnesota Cancer Center researcher. (2008-02-27)

Ultrasound and microbubbles flag malignant cancer in humans, Stanford-led study finds
A team led by researchers from the Stanford University School of Medicine has demonstrated a way to diagnose cancer without resorting to surgery, raising the possibility of far fewer biopsies. (2017-04-04)

New toolkit reveals novel cancer genes
A new statistical model has enabled researchers to pinpoint 27 novel genes thought to prevent cancer from forming, in an analysis of over 2,000 tumors across 12 human cancer types. The findings could help create new cancer treatments that target these genes, and open up other avenues of cancer research. (2017-10-31)

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