Popular Blood Transfusions News and Current Events

Popular Blood Transfusions News and Current Events, Blood Transfusions News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
High blood pressure may make it difficult for the elderly to think clearly
Adding another reason for people to watch their blood pressure, a new study from North Carolina State University shows that increased blood pressure in older adults is directly related to decreased cognitive functioning, particularly among seniors with already high blood pressure. This means that stressful situations may make it more difficult for some seniors to think clearly. (2008-12-15)

Approaching a decades-old goal: Making blood stem cells from patients' own cells
Researchers at Boston Children's Hospital have, for the first time, generated blood-forming stem cells in the lab using pluripotent stem cells, which can make virtually every cell type in the body. The advance, published today in the journal Nature, opens new avenues for research into the root causes of blood diseases and to creating immune-matched blood cells for treatment purposes, derived from patients' own cells. (2017-05-17)

Less blood needed post-surgery, says NEJM study
Patients need less blood after surgery than is widely thought. A new study comparing two plans for giving blood transfusions following surgery showed no ill effects from postponing transfusion until patients develop signs of anemia or their hemoglobin concentration falls below 8 g/dL. (2011-12-15)

Here's something that will raise your blood pressure
The apelin receptor (APJ) has been presumed to play an important role in the contraction of blood vessels involved in blood pressure regulation. A University of Tsukuba-led research team found that APJ was closely associated with hypertension through effects on vascular smooth muscle cells in laboratory mice. In addition, APJ worked synergistically with the α1A-adrenergic receptor to cause vasoconstriction. These results may help to understand blood pressure regulation and support therapies for vascular diseases. (2019-11-01)

A protein makes the difference
It is well-established knowledge that blood vessels foster the growth of tumors. Preventing the formation of tumors is a standard part of cancer therapy. A study by researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg has discovered a new, surprising role played by blood vessels: under certain conditions they can inhibit tumor growth. (2016-10-18)

Why do we develop high blood pressure?
Abnormally high blood pressure, or hypertension, may be related to changes in brain activity and blood flow early in life. That's according to a study conducted on a rat model of high blood pressure, published in Experimental Physiology. (2017-03-09)

Study shows area undamaged by stroke remains so, regardless of time stroke is left untreated
A study led by Achala Vagal, M.D., associate professor at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and a UC Health radiologist, looked at a group of untreated acute stroke patients and found that there was no evidence of time dependence on damage outcomes for the penumbra, or tissue that is at risk of progressing to dead tissue but is still salvageable if blood flow is returned in a stroke, but rather an association with collateral flow -- or rerouting of blood through clear vessels. (2016-05-25)

'Pulling' bacteria out of blood
Magnets instead of antibiotics could provide a possible new treatment method for blood infection. This involves the blood of patients being mixed with magnetic iron particles, which bind the bacteria to them after which they are removed from the blood using magnets. The initial laboratory tests at Empa in St. Gallen have been successful, and seem promising. (2016-12-07)

Novel device and staff education lead to lower blood culture contamination rates
A Medical University of South Carolina study found that use of a mechanical initial specimen diversion device (ISDD®) and staff education led to a nearly four-fold decrease in contaminated blood cultures that was sustained over 20 months. (2018-01-24)

Leadership and adaptive reserve are not associated with blood pressure control
Primary care leadership and practice resilience can strengthen organizational culture. In small primary care practices, however, practice adaptive reserve and leadership capability are not associated with baseline blood pressure control. (2018-04-09)

Predictive value of blood pressure, heart rate, and blood pressure/heart rate ratio in a Chinese subpopulation with vasovagal syncope
In a new publication from Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications; DOI https://doi.org/10.15212/CVIA.2019.1266, Zhuzhi Wen, Jingying Hou, Zun Mai, Huifen Huang, Yangxin Chen, Dengfeng Geng and Jingfeng Wang from Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China and Guandong Province Key Laboratory of Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology, Guangzhou, China consider predictive value of blood pressure, heart rate, and blood pressure/heart rate ratio in a Chinese subpopulation with vasovagal syncope. (2021-01-22)

Loosen up!
Generally, exercise is considered good for you. However, physicians and medical doctors previously prescribed bedrest to people with heart failure, fearing exercise could potentially lead to additional health problems. (2019-10-22)

Sensor for blood flow discovered in blood vessels
The PIEZO1 cation channel translates mechanical stimulus into a molecular response to control the diameter of blood vessels. (2016-11-10)

Time to reassess blood-pressure goals
High blood pressure or hypertension is a major health problem that affects more than 70 million people in the US, and over one billion worldwide. Despite being a critically important risk factor for heart and kidney disease, defining the 'optimal' blood pressure has been a challenge. (2015-11-09)

Brothers in arms: The brain and its blood vessels
The brain and its surrounding blood vessels exist in a close relationship. Researchers from the MPI of Immunobiology and Epigenetics have discovered how cells of the blood vessels sense the metabolic condition of the brain and alter vascular function in response. The result could be important for patients with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's because the onset of these age-related diseases coincides with vascular defects and breakdown of vascular function in the brain. (2020-06-15)

FDA approves Bystolic, a novel beta blocker
The US Food and Drug Administration has approved Bystolic (nebivolol) for the treatment of hypertension, also known as high blood pressure. Bystolic works differently than many older beta blockers in that it is preferentially beta 1 selective at doses less than or equal to 10 mg, meaning it selectively blocks the effects of adrenaline at the heart. In addition, Bystolic vasodilates -- or widens and expands -- the blood vessels. (2007-12-18)

Blood stored longer may be less safe for patients with massive blood loss and shock
In a collaborative study using a mouse model, researchers have found mechanistic links between older stored red blood cell transfusions and subsequent bacterial pneumonia. This may reveal new approaches to improve safety of stored red blood cell transfusions. The key player is free heme, a breakdown product from degraded red blood cells (2018-03-09)

Bevacizumab dramatically improves severe hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) associated bleeding
Patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) with severe bleeding, who were treated with intravenous bevacizumab, reported a marked reduction in nose bleeds and gastrointestinal bleeding and were able to stop or considerably reduce blood transfusions, resulting in significantly improved quality of life. A new study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings provides good quality evidence for the excellent safety profile and efficacy of intravenous bevacizumab in the management of these patients. (2018-01-29)

New strategy for treating high blood pressure
The key to treating blood pressure might lie in people who are 'resistant' to developing high blood pressure even when they eat high salt diets, shows new research published today in Experimental Physiology. (2019-10-22)

Scientists find new antimalarial drug targets
Researchers have discovered crucial new processes that allow malaria parasites to escape red blood cells and infect other cells, offering potential new treatment targets. The team are already working with pharmaceutical companies to use this knowledge to develop new antimalarial drugs - a critical step in the battle against drug-resistant malaria. (2018-02-20)

New tool to improve blood pressure measurement
Oxford University researchers have developed a prediction model that uses three separate blood pressure readings taken in a single consultation and basic patient characteristics to give an adjusted blood pressure reading that is significantly more accurate than existing models for identifying hypertension. (2016-03-21)

Solution to 50-year-old mystery could lead to gene therapy for common blood disorders
In a landmark study that could lead to new therapies for sickle cell anemia and other blood disorders, UNSW Sydney-led researchers have used CRISPR gene editing to introduce beneficial natural mutations into blood cells to boost their production of fetal hemoglobin. The research solves a 50-year-old mystery about how these mutations -- which are naturally carried by a small percentage of people -- operate and alter the expression of human genes. (2018-04-02)

Bristol researchers use gene editing to improve red blood cell transfusion compatibility
Synthetic biologists at the University of Bristol have succeeded in generating laboratory-made red blood cells with rare blood group types that could one day be used to help patients who cannot be matched with donor blood. (2018-04-27)

Cellular barcoding helps scientists understand the behavior of stem cells
By tagging bone marrow cells of mice with a genetic label, or barcode, researchers were able to track and describe the family tree of individual blood cells as they form in their natural environment. (2018-01-03)

The HLF-gene controls the generation of our long-term immune system
A research group at Lund University in Sweden has found that when the HLF (hepatic leukemia factor) gene -- which is expressed in immature blood cells -- does not shut down on time, we are unable to develop a functional long-term immune system. This could be a very early stage of leukemia. (2017-11-22)

A bioengineered tattoo monitors blood calcium levels
Scientists have created a biomedical tattoo that becomes visible on the skin of mice in response to elevated levels of calcium in the blood. (2018-04-18)

Just hours apart, 2 brothers undergo robotic prostate cancer surgery
Two brothers from Savannah, Georgia diagnosed with prostate cancer flew to The Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York to have lifesaving surgery on the same day this week. Dr. David B. Samadi, MD, Chief of Robotics and Minimally Invasive Surgery in the Department of Urology at Mount Sinai successfully performed the robotic prostate cancer surgeries on the siblings one after another on Monday, Jan. 14, 2008. (2008-01-17)

New technology enables identification of biomarkers for a wide range of diseases
Scientists have developed a way to identify biomarkers for a wide range of diseases by assessing the antibodies we are making to the complex sugars coating our cells. The new, highly sensitive Luminex Multiplex Glycan Array enables the kind of volume needed to establish associations between antibody levels in our blood to these complex sugars, or glycans, and conditions from cancer to autoimmune disease and dementia, they report in the journal Nature Communications. (2018-02-12)

Decrease seen in red blood cell, plasma transfusions in US
The frequency of red blood cell and plasma transfusions decreased among hospitalized patients in the United States from 2011 to 2014. (2018-02-27)

Even modest oil exposure can harm coastal and marine birds
Many birds and other wildlife die following an oil spill, but there are also other potential long-terms effects of oil exposure on animals. (2017-10-12)

Brain blood flow sensor discovery could aid treatments for high blood pressure & dementia
A study led by researchers at UCL has discovered the mechanism that allows the brain to monitor its own blood supply, a finding in rats which may help to find new treatments for human conditions including hypertension (high blood pressure) and dementia. (2020-01-14)

New research: Eyes of adolescents could reveal risk of cardiovascular disease
New research has found that poorer well-being or 'health-related quality of life' (HRQoL) in adolescence could be an indicator of future cardiovascular disease risk. Researchers at The Westmead Institute for Medical Research found that adolescents with poorer scores in the social and mental well-being domains of HRQoL have structural changes in their retinal blood vessels that could be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in later life. (2018-04-19)

Blood vessels control brain growth
Blood vessels play a vital role in stem cell reproduction, enabling the brain to grow and develop in the womb, reveals new UCL research in mice. The study shows that blood vessels can increase the number of neural stem cells inside a living organism. This could be important for the design of stem cell-based therapies that aim to regenerate diseased or damaged parts of the nervous system. (2016-11-07)

Children who take steroids at increased risk for diabetes, high blood pressure, blood clots
Children who take oral steroids to treat asthma or autoimmune diseases have an increased risk of diabetes, high blood pressure, and blood clots, according to Rutgers researchers. The Rutgers study is the first to quantify these complications of oral steroids in a nationwide population of children. (2020-09-17)

Can good blood sugar control during labor benefit offspring of diabetic mothers?
Hypoglycaemia, or low blood sugar, is a common and potentially serious outcome in newborns whose mothers were diabetic during pregnancy. Clinicians have wondered whether good blood sugar control during labour might reduce the risk that newborns will have hypoglycaemia. (2018-01-08)

Blood biomarkers as a diagnostic tool for obstructive sleep apnea
Obstructive sleep apnea is a condition causing daytime tiredness which can significantly impact a patient's quality of life and increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. It is a common, chronic disorder that affects thousands of patients, yet recent studies show that many sufferers remain undiagnosed. (2018-06-15)

Better blood pressure control -- by mobile phone
An interactive web system with the help of your mobile phone can be an effective tool for better blood pressure control. Test persons lowered their blood pressure, were better able to understand how their lifestyle affects their blood pressure and actively participated in followup discussions. These results were shown in a doctoral thesis at the University of Gothenburg. (2015-11-25)

Potassium is critical to circadian rhythms in human red blood cells
An innovative new study from the University of Surrey and Cambridge's MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, published in the prestigious journal Nature Communications, has uncovered the secrets of the circadian rhythms in red blood cells and identified potassium as the key to unravelling the mystery. (2017-12-12)

Preventing mortality after myocardial infarction
How much blood to give to anemic patients after a heart attack? The MINT clinical trial, led in Canada by Dr. Paul Hébert from University of Montreal Hospital Research Center will establish the standards. This trial of 3,500 patients in more than 70 hospitals in the United States and Canada aims to improve medical practices and save lives for these vulnerable patients. (2017-01-04)

Study ends debate over role of steroids in treating septic shock
The results from the largest ever study of septic shock could improve treatment for critically ill patients and save health systems worldwide hundreds of millions of dollars each year. Researchers at The George Institute for Global Health studied whether the use of steroids as an additional treatment to septic shock -- a severe life threatening infection -- would improve survival. (2018-01-19)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.