Popular Brain Injury News and Current Events

Popular Brain Injury News and Current Events, Brain Injury News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Columbia engineers translate brain signals directly into speech
In a scientific first, Columbia neuroengineers have created a system that translates thought into intelligible, recognizable speech. This breakthrough, which harnesses the power of speech synthesizers and artificial intelligence, could lead to new ways for computers to communicate directly with the brain. It also lays the groundwork for helping people who cannot speak, such as those living with as ALS or recovering from stroke, regain their ability to communicate with the outside world. (2019-01-29)

Video games to improve mobility after a stroke
A joint research by the Basque research center BCBL and the London Imperial College reveals that, after a cerebral infarction, injuries in areas that control attention also cause motility problems. The authors propose to complement physiotherapy with another type of cognitive training, such as video games. (2018-02-14)

Not just images
Hebrew University scientists have successfully transformed an MRI from a diagnostic camera into a device that can record changes in the biological makeup of brain tissue. The development will help doctors understand whether a patient is merely aging or developing a neurodegenerative disease, such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's. (2019-09-05)

During infancy, neurons are still finding their places
Researchers have identified a large population of previously unrecognized young neurons that migrate in the human brain during the first few months of life, contributing to the expansion of the frontal lobe, a region important for social behavior and executive function. (2016-10-06)

New method increases life span of donated brain tissue
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have developed a method that enables them to use donated brain tissue from people with epilepsy for 48 hours. Previously, the researchers only had 12 hours to test new treatments before the structure of the cells started to break down. The research has now been published in the journal Scientific Reports. (2018-03-09)

Neurons that regenerate, neurons that die
In a new study published in Neuron, investigators report on a transcription factor that they have found that can help certain neurons regenerate, while simultaneously killing others. (2017-06-21)

New test may quickly identify mild traumatic brain injury with underlying brain damage
A new test using peripheral vision reaction time could lead to earlier diagnosis and more effective treatment of mild traumatic brain injury, often referred to as a concussion. (2017-02-16)

Newborn baby brain scans will help scientists track brain development
Scientists have today published ground-breaking scans of newborn babies' brains which researchers from all over the world can download and use to study how the human brain develops. (2017-05-09)

Neuroimaging categorizes 4 depression subtypes
Patients with depression can be categorized into four unique subtypes defined by distinct patterns of abnormal connectivity in the brain, according to new research from Weill Cornell Medicine. (2016-12-08)

Mild traumatic brain injury causes long-term damage in mice
A new Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology study in mice found that mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) can precipitate not only acute damage but also a lifelong degenerative process. (2017-12-14)

NIH study uncovers blood vessel damage & inflammation in COVID-19 patients' brains but no infection
In an in-depth study of how COVID-19 affects a patient's brain, National Institutes of Health researchers consistently spotted hallmarks of damage caused by thinning and leaky brain blood vessels in tissue samples from patients who died shortly after contracting the disease. In addition, they saw no signs of SARS-CoV-2 in the tissue samples, suggesting the damage was not caused by a direct viral attack on the brain. (2020-12-30)

Study describes changes to structural brain networks after radiotherapy for brain tumors
Researchers compared the thickness of brain cortex in patients with brain tumors before and after radiation therapy was applied and found significant dose-dependent changes in the structural properties of cortical neural networks, at both the local and global level. (2017-06-26)

Sleep chemical central to effectiveness of deep brain stimulation
A brain chemical that makes us sleepy also appears to play a central role in the success of deep brain stimulation to ease symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease and other brain disorders. The surprising finding is outlined in a paper published online Dec. 23 in Nature Medicine. (2007-12-23)

Why do we develop high blood pressure?
Abnormally high blood pressure, or hypertension, may be related to changes in brain activity and blood flow early in life. That's according to a study conducted on a rat model of high blood pressure, published in Experimental Physiology. (2017-03-09)

Motorcycle crashes cause 5 times as many deaths as car accidents, 6 times the health costs
Motorcycle accidents are costly in terms of lives and health care costs. Compared with car accidents, motorcycle accidents cause three times the injuries, six times the medical costs and 5 times the deaths, found new research in CMAJ. Despite better motor vehicle safety, injuries from motorcycle crashes have not improved. (2017-11-20)

New model may provide insights on neurocognitive disorders caused by HIV
HIV infects certain cells in the brain called microglia, and infected microglia release toxic and inflammatory molecules that can impair or kill surrounding neurons. (2017-11-08)

Traumatic brain injury biomarker shows promise to support rapid damage evaluation and predict outcomes
A new study in The American Journal of Pathology found that a brain lipid molecule, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), was significantly increased after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in a preclinical animal model. They also found that it was elevated in areas associated with cell death and axonal injury, both major hallmarks of moderate and severe TBI. This strengthens the evidence that LPA could be used as a biomarker of TBI through blood testing, potentially providing a prognostic indicator of injury and outcome. (2018-07-16)

True nature of cells blamed in Alzheimer's revealed
Immune cells commonly blamed in Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases are actually precision cleaning machines protecting the central nervous system, new research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine shows. (2018-06-25)

Simple tests may predict older patients' risk of falling while hospitalized
Simple Tests May Predict Older Patients' Risk of Falling While Hospitalized A study of 807 older individuals admitted to hospital found that those who had poorer physical function at the time of admission were more likely to fall during their hospital stay; 329 falls occurred in 189 patients, including 161 injurious falls, of which 24 were serious. (2018-02-09)

Long-term trauma outcomes heavily impacted by gender and education level
Researchers find sociodemographic factors more predictive of worse outcomes than injury severity. (2019-01-03)

Slow, steady waves keep brain humming
Very slow brain waves, long considered an artifact of brain scanning techniques, may be more important than anyone had realized. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that very slow waves are directly linked to state of consciousness and may be involved in coordinating activity across distant brain regions. (2018-03-29)

Typical male brain anatomy associated with higher probability of autism spectrum disorder
A study of high-functioning adults with autism spectrum disorder suggests that characteristically male brain anatomy was associated with increased probability of ASD, according to a new article published online by JAMA Psychiatry. (2017-02-08)

Talk to the hand
Fans of the blockbuster movie 'Iron Man 3' might remember the characters step inside the digital projection of a 'big brain' and watch as groups of neurons are 'lit up' along the brain's neural 'map' in response to physical touch. Now, much like that scene, researchers at the University of Missouri have discovered a new insight into how the complex neural map of the human brain operates. (2019-11-05)

Maternal inflammation boosts serotonin and impairs fetal brain development in mice
Fighting the flu during pregnancy sickens a pregnant woman, but it may also put the fetus at a slightly increased risk for neurodevelopmental disorders like autism later in life. A new study in pregnant mice, published June 1 in The Journal of Neuroscience, offers a potential mechanism explaining why: Inflammation alters neurotransmitters and impairs growth of nerve cells in the developing fetal brain. (2016-05-31)

Explaining autism
Recognizing a need to better understand the biology that produces Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) symptoms, scientists at Duke-NUS Medical School (Duke-NUS) and the National Neuroscience Institute (NNI), Singapore, have teamed up and identified a novel mechanism that potentially links abnormal brain development to the cause of ASDs. This new knowledge will help to improve the diagnosis and development of therapeutic interventions for ASDs. (2016-02-17)

Improving cell transplantation after spinal cord injury: When, where and how?
Spinal cord injuries are mostly caused by trauma, often incurred in road traffic or sporting incidents, often with devastating and irreversible consequences. According to a systematic analysis of 49 animal studies published this week in PLOS Biology by Ralf Watzlawick, Jan Schwab and colleagues, after experimental spinal cord injury, transplanting olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) into the site of damage significantly improves locomotor performance. (2016-05-31)

Study looks at the prevalence, challenges of athletes with ADHD
It's estimated there are more than six million children in the United States with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). There has been a lot of research about the impact ADHD can have on students in the classroom, but much less is known about how ADHD might impact athletes on the field of play. (2017-05-11)

New study suggests rethink of dementia causes
University of Adelaide researchers have developed a new theory for the causes of dementia and other neurodegenerative diseases, involving an out-of-control immune system. (2016-05-12)

Neurotrophic factor GDNF is an important regulator of dopamine neurons in the brain
New research results are expanding our understanding of the physiological role of the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor GDNF in the function of the brain's dopamine systems. In an article recently published in the Journal of Neuroscience, University of Helsinki researchers establish that GDNF is an important physiological regulator of the functioning of the brain's dopamine neurons. (2017-02-15)

The brain watched during language learning
Researchers from Nijmegen, the Netherlands, have for the first time captured images of the brain during the initial hours and days of learning a new language. They use an artificial language with real structures to show how new linguistic information is integrated into the same brain areas used for your native language. (2016-06-29)

Findings support role of vascular disease in development of Alzheimer's disease
Among adults who entered a study more than 25 years ago, an increasing number of midlife vascular risk factors, such as obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol and smoking, were associated with elevated levels of brain amyloid (protein fragments linked to Alzheimer's disease) later in life, according to a study published by JAMA. (2017-04-11)

Scientists predict the areas of the brain to stimulate transitions between different brain states
Using a computer model of the brain, Gustavo Deco, director of the Center for Brain and Cognition, and Josephine Cruzat, a member of his team, together with a group of international collaborators, have developed an innovative method published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on Sept. 3. (2019-10-03)

Nature, meet nurture
Is it nature or nurture that ultimately shapes an organism? A new study reveals a dramatic landscape of gene expression changes across all cell types in the mouse visual cortex after a sensory experience, many linked to neural connectivity and the brain's ability to rewire itself to learn and adapt. (2018-02-08)

Ohio University study shows high number of concussion-related symptoms in performing arts
A recent study released by the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine shows a stunning number of participants not only experienced concussion-related symptoms and head impacts but also continued performing either without reporting the incident or without receiving the recommended care. These participants were not taking part in any sporting contest at the time, however. They are theater personnel. (2018-04-03)

Tumor-killing virus selectively targets diseased brain cells
New findings show that a specialized virus with the ability to reproduce its tumor-killing genes can selectively target tumors in the brains of mice and eliminate them. Healthy brain tissue remained virtually untouched, according to a Feb. 20 report in the Journal of Neuroscience. With more research, the technique could one day offer a novel way of treating brain cancer in humans. (2008-02-19)

MBL scientists identify gene partnerships that promote spinal cord regeneration
Scientists at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) have identified gene 'partners' in the axolotl salamander that, when activated, allow the neural tube and associated nerve fibers to functionally regenerate after severe spinal cord damage. Interestingly, these genes are also present in humans, though they are activated in a different manner. Their results are published this week in Nature Communications Biology. (2019-03-06)

Study explores safety of rear-facing car seats in rear impact car crashes
Experts know that rear-facing car seats protect infants and toddlers in front and side impact crashes, but they are rarely discussed when it comes to rear-impact collisions. Because rear-impact crashes account for more than 25 percent of all accidents, researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center conducted a new study to explore the effectiveness of rear-facing car seats in this scenario. (2018-04-03)

Whale Sharks show remarkable capacity to recover from injuries
A new study has for the first time explored the extraordinary rate at which the world's largest fish, the endangered whale shark, can recover from its injuries. The findings reveal that lacerations and abrasions, increasingly caused through collisions with boats, can heal in a matter of weeks and researchers found evidence of partially removed dorsal fins re-growing. (2021-02-23)

Characteristic pattern of protein deposits in brains of retired NFL players who suffered concussions
A new UCLA study takes another step toward the early understanding of a degenerative brain condition called chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE, which affects athletes in contact sports who are exposed to repetitive brain injuries. Using a new imaging tool, researchers found a strikingly similar pattern of abnormal protein deposits in the brains of retired NFL players who suffered from concussions. (2015-04-06)

Researchers shed light on why exercise slows progression of Parkinson's disease
While vigorous exercise on a treadmill has been shown to slow the progression of Parkinson's disease in patients, the molecular reasons behind it have remained a mystery. (2017-12-22)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.