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Popular Breastfeeding News and Current Events

Popular Breastfeeding News and Current Events, Breastfeeding News Articles.
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Breastfeeding lowers risk of type 2 diabetes following gestational diabetes
Women with gestational diabetes who consistently and continuously breastfeed from the time of giving birth are half as likely to develop type 2 diabetes within two years after delivery, according to a study from Kaiser Permanente published today in Annals of Internal Medicine. (2015-11-23)
Breastfed babies are less likely to have eczema as teenagers, study shows
Babies whose mothers had received support to breastfeed exclusively for a sustained period from birth have a 54 percent lower risk of eczema at the age of 16, a new study led by researchers from King's College London, Harvard University, University of Bristol and McGill University shows. (2017-11-13)
Important to communicate cancer prevention message to young adults to reduce risks later in life
The latest estimates suggest that, by 2020, more than 1.9 million Americans will be diagnosed with cancer each year. (2017-08-14)
Breastfeeding may have long-term heart health benefits for some moms
Women with normal blood pressure during pregnancy and who breastfed their babies for at least six months following birth had better markers of cardiovascular health years later compared to women who never breastfed, based on research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session. (2018-02-28)
Did prolonged breastfeeding reduce risk of asthma, atopic eczema in adolescents?
A breastfeeding program appeared to reduce the development of atopic eczema (an allergic skin response) but not asthma and lung function among children at age 16. (2017-11-13)
Breastfeeding may protect against chronic pain after Caesarean section
Breastfeeding after a Caesarean section (C-section) may help manage pain, with mothers who breastfed their babies for at least two months after the operation three times less likely to experience persistent pain compared to those who breastfed for less than two months, according to new research being presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia Congress in Geneva (June 3-5). (2017-06-03)
Breastfeeding reduces hypertension risk
A study published in the American Journal of Hypertension indicates that women who breastfeed more children, and for longer periods of time, are less likely to suffer from hypertension after they reach menopause. (2018-01-30)
Physician moms are often subject to workplace discrimination
Of the nearly 6,000 physician mothers in the survey, nearly 78 percent reported discrimination of any type. (2017-05-08)
Healthy weight gain in infants
With nearly 10 percent of infants considered 'high weight for length,' University of Delaware researcher Jillian Trabulsi wants to help babies achieve a healthy weight starting with their first months of life. (2017-03-20)
Improved maternity care practices decrease racial gaps in breastfeeding in the US South
A new paper published in Pediatrics links successful implementation of Baby-Friendly™ practices in the southern US with increases in breastfeeding rates and improved, evidence-based care. (2019-01-18)
Breastfeeding may protect high-birthweight infants from childhood obesity
Breastfeeding may protect high-birthweight infants from having overweight or obesity as children, new research from South Korea suggests. (2018-03-18)
Safe-sleep recommendations for infants have not reduced sudden deaths in newborns
An analysis by investigators from MassGeneral Hospital for Children and Newton-Wellesley Hospital of trends in sudden unexpected infant death finds that the drop in such deaths that took place following release of the 1992 American Academy of Pediatrics 'back to sleep' recommendations, did not occur in infants in the first month of life. (2018-02-14)
Mothers living with food insecurity less likely to breastfeed exclusively to 6 months
Mothers with babies living in households with food insecurity -- inadequate or unpredictable access to food because of financial issues -- are less likely to breastfeed exclusively to the recommended six months, found a study published in CMAJ. (2018-03-19)
Breastfeeding gaps between white, black, and Hispanic mothers in the US
Chapman University has published research on how breastfeeding rates differ among white, black and Hispanic mothers. (2016-07-12)
Nicotine in breast milk disrupts infants' sleep patterns
A study from the Monell Chemical Senses Center reports that nicotine in the breast milk of lactating mothers who smoke cigarettes disrupts their infants' sleep patterns. (2007-09-04)
What causes women to stop breastfeeding early?
A recent systematic literature review has investigated potential sociodemographic, physical, mental, and social factors that may cause breastfeeding mothers to stop breastfeeding before infants reach 6 months of age. (2017-06-07)
The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine issues guidance on informal milk sharing
In response to the increasing informal sharing of human milk, the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine (ABM) has published guidelines to minimize the risk of this practice while enhancing the health benefits. (2018-01-08)
Victims of violence stop breastfeeding sooner
One in four women who have been victims of violence as adults are at risk of stopping breastfeeding before their baby is four months old. (2016-03-09)
Maternal fatty acid balance affects offspring obesity thorough gut microbial population
A Massachusetts General Hospital study finds that the balance between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids in the tissues of female mammals, which previous research has suggested can impact the incidence of obesity in their offspring, may to do so through its effect on the microbial population of the infant's gastrointestinal tract. (2018-06-05)
Stress in new mothers causes lasting health risks, depending on race, ethnicity, poverty
African-American women undergo more physical 'wear-and-tear' during the first year after giving birth than Latina and white women, a consequence that may have long-lasting health effects, according to a study of a diverse group of more than 2,400 low-income women. (2018-12-14)
Breastfeeding does not protect children against asthma and allergies
The effect of breastfeeding on the risk of developing asthma and allergy has been debated for a long time. (2017-11-13)
Breastfeeding reduces risk of endometriosis diagnosis
A new study by investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital finds that women who breastfed for longer periods of time had significantly lower risk of being diagnosed with endometriosis, offering new insights into a condition that, up until now, has had very few known, modifiable risk factors. (2017-08-30)
SWAT team of immune cells found in mother's milk
Immune cells that are ready to take action against invaders like bacteria have been found in women's breast milk, researchers say. (2018-05-03)
Breastfeeding may help prevent children's asthma exacerbations later in life
In a Pediatric Allergy and Immunology analysis of children with asthma, those who had been breastfed had a 45 percent lower risk of asthma exacerbations later in life compared with children who had not been breastfed. (2017-09-01)
Breastfeeding mothers stop nursing sooner when living with smokers
Nursing mothers who live with two or more smokers are more likely to stop breastfeeding sooner than those who live in nonsmoking households. (2018-06-27)
T cell-inducing dengue vaccines may better protect children of vaccinated mothers
Although maternal antibodies help to protect babies against dengue virus infection, they can also be detrimental. (2017-12-22)
Study examines impact of extended maternity leave on breastfeeding in active duty mothers
This study evaluates the effects of prolongation of maternity leave duration on the initiation and duration of breastfeeding in active duty mothers at a single military treatment facility. (2018-05-05)
Women with food insecurity less likely to breastfeed: U of T study
Researchers from the University of Toronto have shown that women who struggle to afford food are less able to sustain breastfeeding than those who are food-secure -- even though women in both groups start the practice at about the same rate. (2018-03-19)
Sugars in some breast milk could help protect babies from group B strep
Group B strep bacteria remain the leading cause of severe infections in newborns worldwide. (2017-08-20)
Breastfeeding for two months halves risk of SIDS, study finds
Breastfeeding for at least two months cuts a baby's risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome almost in half, a sweeping new international study has found. (2017-10-30)
Can breastfeeding reduce a woman's risk of metabolic syndrome?
A new study shows that women who spend a longer time breastfeeding during their lifetimes may be able to lower their risk of metabolic syndrome and related disorders included elevated blood pressure, glucose, and triglyceride levels. (2017-02-16)
Strong maternal antibodies for HIV ineffective for protecting infants from HIV
HIV+ mothers who possess a strong neutralizing antibody response may be more likely to pass the virus on to her infant through breast feeding. (2017-10-31)
Children breastfeeding after first birthday should take vitamin D supplements, study says
Children who are breastfeeding after their first birthday should take a vitamin D supplement to prevent health problems such as rickets, new research suggests. (2016-02-18)
Early breastfeeding success not affected by epidural pain relief with fentanyl
Including the opioid fentanyl in the solution used to maintain an epidural during childbirth does not appear to affect the success of breastfeeding six weeks after delivery, according to a study published in Anesthesiology, the peer-reviewed medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA). (2017-11-08)
The latest science on breastfeeding
Guidelines recommend breastfeeding as the best source of nutrition for most babies. (2018-06-09)
Study shows link between breastfeeding and infant health is not straight-forward
Results from new study suggest that the benefits of breastfeeding reported in the vast majority of prior research could be influenced by the mother's characteristics, such as what they know about health and nutrition. (2018-09-25)
Women who breastfeed for at least five months have more kids
Cornell University professor of sociology Vida Maralani found in new research that women who breastfeed their first child for five months or longer are more likely to have three of more children, and less likely to have only one child. (2018-09-19)
Fish-rich diets may boost babies' brain development
Women could enhance the development of their unborn child's eyesight and brain function by regularly eating fatty fish during pregnancy. (2018-09-20)
Post-breastfeeding tissue remodeling explained by new research
A groundbreaking study into the changes that occur in a woman's breast, from growing into one that provides milk for a newborn, and then back to its normal state, has discovered that milk-producing cells are, in effect, cannibalized by other cells following the period of breastfeeding. (2016-10-12)
Breastfeeding may help protect mothers against stroke
Breastfeeding was associated with a lower risk of stroke in post-menopausal women who reported breastfeeding at least one child. (2018-08-22)
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