Popular Breeding News and Current Events

Popular Breeding News and Current Events, Breeding News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Wheat myth debunked
Common opinion has it that modern wheat is so reliant on fertiliser and crop protection agrochemicals that the plants now lack the hardiness needed to remain productive under harsher environmental conditions. But comprehensive new research shows that modern wheat varieties out-perform older varieties even when grown under unfavourable conditions that include low agrochemical inputs and drought stress. (2019-06-17)

New features of a gene defect that affects muzzle length and caudal vertebrae in dogs
A recent genetic study at the University of Helsinki provides new information on the occurrence of a DVL2 gene defect associated with a screw tail and its relevance to canine constitution and health. The variant was found in several Bulldog and Pit Bull type breeds, and it was shown to result in caudal vertebral anomalies and shortening of the muzzle. The DLV2 variant may also affect the development of the heart. (2021-02-23)

Climate change prompts Alaska fish to change breeding behavior
A new University of Washington study finds that one of Alaska's most abundant freshwater fish species is altering its breeding patterns in response to climate change, which could impact the ecology of northern lakes that already acutely feel the effects of a changing climate. (2017-01-18)

Fairy-wrens change breeding habits to cope with climate change
Warmer temperatures linked to climate change are having a big impact on the breeding habits of one of Australia's most recognisable bird species, according to researchers at The Australian National University (ANU). (2019-10-10)

Climate-influenced changes in flowering, fruiting also affect bird abundance, activities
A new study has documented shifts in Hawaiian bird abundance, breeding and molting based on climate-related changes to native vegetation. Researchers with the US Forest Service's Pacific Southwest Research Station recently reviewed extensive climate, vegetation and bird data collected between 1976 and 1982 at a 40-acre monitoring site about 5 miles outside Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park on Hawai'i Island. The study is featured in this month's issue of Ecology. (2017-11-08)

A Cereal survives heat and drought
An international consortium around the biologist Wolfram Weckwerth has published the genome sequence of Pearl millet, a drought resistant crop plant most important in aride regions in Africa and Asia. This plant is important to small and medium farmers who grow the plant without larger irrigation. Pearl millet delivers a good harvest index under drought and heat conditions when rice, maize or wheat already have no grains anymore. (2017-09-18)

Male pipefish pregnancy, it's complicated
In the upside-down world of the pipefish, sexual selection appears to work in reverse, with flashy females battling for males who bear the pregnancy and carry their young to term in their brood pouch. But new research shows even more factors appear to play a role in determining mating success. (2017-01-04)

'Cold-blooded' pythons make for caring moms
The female Southern African python is the first ever egg-laying snake species shown to care for their babies. This comes at great cost to themselves, as they never eat during the breeding period -- with many snakes starving -- and turn their color to black in order to attract more sun while basking to raise their body temperature. (2018-03-14)

Evolutionary crop research: Ego-plants give lower yield
Evolutionary biologists are calling for a shift in the usual plant breeding paradigm, which is based on selecting the fittest plants to create new varieties. New research results show that a plants ability to be less competitive and behave according to the good of the group could be a key feature in the attempt to increase crop yields. (2017-10-02)

Breeding trouble: Meta-analysis identifies fishy issues with captive stocks
A meta-analysis has found patterns that may be jeopardising the long-term success of worldwide animal breeding programs, which increasingly act as an insurance against extinction in conservation, and for food security. Captive-born animals had, on average, almost half the odds of reproductive success compared to their wild-born counterparts in captivity; in aquaculture, the effects were particularly pronounced. The Sydney-based scientists were surprised by how universal the patterns were across the animal kingdom. (2018-03-13)

New Zealand penguins make mammoth migrations, traveling thousands of kilometers to feed
Fiordland penguins, Eudyptes pachyrhynchus, known as Tawaki, migrate up to 2,500 km from their breeding site, according to a study publishing Aug. 29 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Thomas Mattern of the University of Otago and colleagues. (2018-08-29)

As climate is warming up, more bird nests are destroyed in Finnish farmland
A new study shows that birds have shifted the time of their breeding much faster than the farmers are anticipating their sowing times in Finnish farmland. This means that more birds are nowadays laying their eggs on fields that are still to be sown, a mismatch in timing that is most likely fatal for the bird nests. (2018-01-11)

Crossbreeding threatens conservation of endangered milky storks: NUS study
A team of researchers led by Assistant Professor Frank Rheindt from the National University of Singapore has discovered that the conservation of milky storks, an endangered wading bird native to Southeast Asia, is threatened due to crossbreeding with their more widespread cousins, the painted storks. The team's findings can contribute to the design of effective solutions for conservation management of the globally endangered species. (2019-01-31)

Albatross populations in decline from fishing and environmental change
The populations of wandering, black-browed and grey-headed albatrosses have halved over the last 35 years on sub-antarctic Bird Island according to a new study published today (Nov. 20) in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. (2017-11-20)

Transfer learning meets livestock genomics
Researchers at Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) have developed a new computational method that predicts harmful mutations in mammalian species. As more and more livestock producers are using genetic tests to improve their herds, this method will help to optimize and guide the animal breeding programmes, as well as increase the profitability and yields of livestock. (2018-04-13)

Deciphering plant immunity against parasites
Nematodes are a huge threat to agriculture since they parasitize important crops such as wheat, soybean, and banana; but plants can defend themselves. Researchers at Bonn University, together with collaborators from the Sainsbury Laboratory in Norwich, identified a protein that allows plants to recognize a chemical signal from the worm and initiate immune responses against the invaders. This discovery will help to develop crop plants that feature enhanced protection against this type of parasites. (2017-04-13)

Human influences challenge penguin populations
Warming in Antarctica, as well as mining, commercial fishing, and oil and gas development at lower latitudes, threaten Penguin populations throughout the Southern Hemishere, according to an assessment published in the July/August 2008 issue of BioScience. (2008-07-01)

Bringing water to the fountain of youth
A new study of the European common frog, Rana temporaria, published in the advanced online edition of the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution, offers some fresh clues that challenge the conventional scientific wisdom on sex-chromosome evolution. (2018-01-30)

What stops mass extinctions?
What slows or stops a disease epidemic if the pathogen is still present? It appears that wild frogs are becoming increasingly resistant to the chytrid fungal disease that has decimated amphibian populations around the world. (2018-03-29)

Scouting the eagles: Proof that protecting nests aids reproduction
Reproduction among bald eagles in a remote national park in Minnesota was aided when their nests were protected from human disturbance, according to a study published today (Jan. 9, 2018) in the Journal of Applied Ecology. (2018-01-09)

Emperor penguins may shorten record fast by snacking
Male emperor penguins are famed for their feats of endurance, fasting for 115 days during the mating season and while incubating eggs. However, some emperor penguin colonies are situated closer to the sea ice edge; might they have shorter fasts? During the Antarctic winter, Gerald Kooyman observed Cape Washington emperor penguins diving in the dark, suggesting that they might be feeding during the mating season, shortening their fast to as little as 65 days. (2018-01-09)

Wintering warblers choose agriculture over forest
Effective conservation for long-distance migrants requires knowing what's going on with them year-round -- not just when they're in North America during the breeding season. A new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications uncovers yellow warblers' surprising habitat preferences in their winter home in Mexico and raises questions about what their use of agricultural habitat could mean for their future. (2018-05-02)

Scientists crack genome of superfood seaweed, ito-mozuku
For the first time, researchers unveil the genome of ito-mozuku (Nemacystus decipiens), the popular Japanese brown seaweed, providing data that could help farmers better grow the health food. (2019-03-14)

High-protein rice brings value, nutrition
A new advanced line of rice, with higher yield, is ready for final field testing prior to release. On average, it has a protein content of 10.6 percent, a 53 percent increase from its original protein content. It also needs less heat, time, and usually less water to cook. (2019-01-23)

Movement of rainforest butterflies restricted by oil palm plantations
Scientists at the University of York have found that oil palm plantations, which produce oil for commercial use in cooking, food products, and cosmetics, may act as a barrier to the movement of butterflies across tropical landscapes. (2016-12-19)

Genetic modification and genome editing rely on active roles for researchers and industry
In a review published in the Journal of Dairy ScienceĀ® authors from the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences discuss potential applications of genetic modification and genome editing of cattle for food production, considering both the breeding program and its ethical aspects. The authors concluded that an active role by all those involved is necessary to support scientific developments. (2017-12-20)

Sheep gene insights could help farmers breed healthier animals
Fresh insights into the genetic code of sheep could aid breeding programmes to improve their health and productivity. Scientists at the University of Edinburgh's Roslin Institute have mapped which genes are turned on and off in the different tissues and organs in a sheep's body. (2017-09-18)

Don't blame adolescent social behavior on hormones
Reproductive hormones that develop during puberty are not responsible for changes in social behavior that occur during adolescence, according to the results of a newly published study by a University at Buffalo researcher. 'Changes in social behavior during adolescence appear to be independent of pubertal hormones. They are not triggered by puberty, so we can't blame the hormones,' says Matthew Paul, an assistant professor in UB's Department of Psychology. (2018-03-19)

Speed breeding technique sows seeds of new green revolution
A new technology, speed breeding, allows plants to be grown more rapidly. The technology produced wheat, from seed-to-seed in 8 weeks. Dr Brande Wulff (John Innes Centre) explains why speed is of the essence: (2018-01-01)

Corn hybrids with high yields come with more variability
The agriculture industry is in a tough spot; it's simultaneously tasked with feeding a growing population and minimizing its environmental footprint. For corn breeders, that means improving nitrogen-use efficiency and crowding tolerance, all while maximizing yield. The first step, according to a new study from the University of Illinois, is understanding the genetic yield potential of current hybrids. (2018-04-09)

Fish team up for more food
A tiny striped fish called Neolamprologus obscurus only found in Lake Tanganyika in Zambia excavates stones to create shelter and increase the abundance of food for all fish in the group. Led by Hirokazu Tanaka of the University of Bern in Switzerland and the Osaka City University in Japan, this study is the first to document how team work in fish helps them to acquire more food. The research is published in Springer's journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology. (2018-03-06)

Flour power to boost food security
A glue-like protein that holds the wheat grain together could hold the secret for yielding more, and healthier, flour from wheat. (2017-10-31)

Building disease-beating wheat
Disease resistance genes from three different grass species have been combined in the world's first (2007-12-12)

Using whole genome analysis to home in on racing pigeon performance
A scientific team led by Malgorzata Anna Gazda and Miguel Carneiro, performed the first whole genome sequencing of 10 racing pigeons as well as data from 35 different breeds, and has now identified new clues in racing pigeons that may help enhance their performance. The study also including looking at gene expression differences (using RNA sequencing expression data) in the brains and muscle tissue of racing pigeons versus other breeds. (2018-03-13)

Virginia Tech researchers trace the potato's origins, learn about its untapped potential
Thanks to Veilleux and Laimbeer, it will soon be easier to breed the perfect potato chip or to access desirable traits such as enhanced disease resistance in wild or primitive species. (2017-12-13)

Iron Age breeding practices likely influenced lack of stallion lineages in modern horses
Selective breeding just before and during the Iron Age nearly 3,000 years ago is likely the reason for the lack of variability in modern domestic horses' paternally inherited DNA, a trait unique among livestock animals. (2018-04-18)

House sparrow decline linked to air pollution and poor diet
House sparrows are well-adapted to living in urban areas, so it is surprising their numbers have fallen significantly over the past decades. An investigation by Spanish researchers into this worrying trend, published in open-access journal Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, finds that sparrows living in urban areas are adversely affected by pollution and poor nutrition. The study also finds the birds suffer more during the breeding season, when resources are needed to produce healthy eggs. (2017-10-03)

New discovery to accelerate development of salt-tolerant grapevines
A recent discovery by Australian scientists is likely to improve the sustainability of the Australian wine sector and significantly accelerate the breeding of more robust salt-tolerant grapevines. (2017-11-27)

Female mongooses help their pups by driving out rivals
Mongoose mothers boost their pups' survival chances by evicting rival females from their social groups, new research shows. (2017-11-14)

Breeding highly productive corn has reduced its ability to adapt
Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison wanted to know whether the last 100 years of selecting for corn that is acclimated to particular locations has changed its ability to adapt to new or stressful environments. By measuring populations of corn plants planted across North America, they could test how the corn genomes responded to different growing conditions. (2017-11-09)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.