Popular Bridge News and Current Events

Popular Bridge News and Current Events, Bridge News Articles.
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Research reveals evidence of new population of ancient Native Americans
Genetic analysis of ancient DNA from a 6-week-old infant found at an Interior Alaska archaeological site has revealed a previously unknown population of ancient people in North America. The findings, published in the Jan. 3 edition of the journal Nature, represent a major shift in scientists' theories about how humans populated North America. The researchers have named the new group 'Ancient Beringians.' (2018-01-03)

Designing DNA from scratch: Engineering the functions of micrometer-sized DNA droplets
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have constructed ''DNA droplets'' comprising designed DNA nanostructures. The droplets exhibit dynamic functions such as fusion, fission, Janus-shape formation, and protein capture. Their technique is expected to be applicable to a wide variety of biomaterials, opening doors to many promising applications in materials design, drug delivery, and even artificial cell-like molecular systems. (2020-07-15)

Keeping an eye on the health of structures
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) used synthetic-aperture radar data from four different satellites, combined with statistical methods, to determine the structural deformation patterns of the largest bridge in Iran. (2018-04-12)

Ships in the English Channel have highest rate of sulphur violations in northern Europe
Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have shown that between 87 and 98 percent of ships comply with the tougher regulations for sulphur emissions that were introduced in northern Europe in 2015. The lowest levels of compliance were observed in the western part of the English Channel and in the middle of the Baltic Sea. (2018-03-22)

Fuel from waste and electricity?
Researchers at Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research, the University of Tübingen, Cornell University, and Deutsche Biomasseforschungszentrum have shown that the combination of microbial and electrochemical conversion of biomass can yield valuable products. For the example of corn beer and corn silage they have gained energy-dense alkanes with diesel-fuel like properties at high carbon and energetic yield. Their work is published in Energy & Environmental Science, the highest ranked journal in environmental sciences. (2017-09-18)

Flexible ultrasound patch could make it easier to inspect damage in odd-shaped structures
Researchers have developed a stretchable, flexible patch that could make it easier to perform ultrasound imaging on odd-shaped structures, such as engine parts, turbines, reactor pipe elbows and railroad tracks -- objects that are difficult to examine using conventional ultrasound equipment. The ultrasound patch is a versatile and more convenient tool to inspect machine and building parts for defects and damage deep below the surface. (2018-03-23)

Professor publishes archaeological research on social inequality
The origins of social inequality might lie in the remnants of ancient Eurasia's agricultural societies, according to an article recently published in the major science journal Nature. (2017-11-17)

New gene therapy sparks healthy heart beats
Michael Kotlikoff, provost of Cornell University and a professor of molecular physiology, is part of an international collaboration that is aiming to prevent heart arrhythmias with a simple gene-therapy approach. (2018-05-09)

Study shows a potential new approach to opioid crisis
In a six-month study recently concluded, a research unit affiliated with two hospital institutions and a university in Ottawa found that a reduction in the number of cigarettes smoked daily also reduced a smoker's dependence on opioids. (2018-01-25)

Prisoner HIV program leads to continuum of medical care after release
By linking HIV positive prisoners to community-based medical care prior to release through an innovative program called Project Bridge, 95 percent of ex-offenders were retained in health care for a year after being released from incarceration, according to researchers from the Miriam Hospital. (2008-05-07)

Algorithm can create a bridge between Clinton and Trump supporters
The article that received the best student-paper award in the Tenth International Conference on Web Search and Data Mining (WSDM 2017) builds algorithmic techniques to mitigate the rising polarization by connecting people with opposing views -- and evaluates them on Twitter. (2017-02-16)

A secret ingredient to help heal spinal cord injuries?
Researchers have identified a protein in zebrafish that facilitates healing of major spinal cord injuries. (2016-11-03)

Dental implants preferred option for aging bridges
Aging dental bridges are a maintenance headache and a recipe for oral-health disaster. They are difficult to floss, often decay, and require replacement with longer bridges. According to the American Academy of Implant Dentistry, these bridges to nowhere should be replaced with permanent dental implants. (2008-05-29)

UC Davis hosts the second Climate-Smart Agriculture Global Science Conference
The University of California, Davis, will host the second Climate-Smart Agriculture Global Science Conference on March 20-22, 2013. Co-organized by UC Davis and the World Bank, the conference will focus on science-based actions that can provide resilience for food systems despite the future uncertainty of climate change and extreme events. (2013-02-19)

Are bots a danger for political election campaigns?
Normally, autonomous computer programs known as bots are used to trawl the Internet. However, there are also programs known as social bots which interfere in social media, automatically generating replies or sharing content. They are currently suspected of being used to spread political propaganda. Scientists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have investigated the extent to which autonomous programs such as these were used on the platform Twitter during the general elections in Japan in 2014. (2018-02-20)

Debt matters: Women use credit to bridge income gaps, while men are less cautious
A new study on attitudes about debt shows that men have greater tolerance for using debt to buy luxury items, while women are more accepting of debt used in appropriate ways, including to bridge income gaps. (2018-04-03)

Clockwork under the microscope
Circadian clocks regulate the behaviour of all living things. Scientists from the University of Würzburg have now taken a closer look at the clock's anatomical structures and molecular processes in the honeybee. (2018-01-16)

Bacteria may travel thousands of miles through the air globally
Bacteria may travel thousands of miles through the air worldwide instead of hitching rides with people and animals, according to Rutgers and other scientists. Their 'air bridge' hypothesis could shed light on how harmful bacteria share antibiotic resistance genes. (2019-03-25)

First dogs in the Americas arrived from Siberia, disappeared after European contact
A study reported in the journal Science offers an enhanced view of the origins and ultimate fate of the first dogs in the Americas. The dogs were not domesticated North American wolves, as some have speculated, but likely followed their human counterparts over a land bridge that once connected North Asia and the Americas, the study found. (2018-07-05)

Bungee jumping for science
Immediately before a person decides to launch themselves off a bridge for a bungee jump, there is a measurable increase in their brain activity. This can be recorded nearly one second before the person makes the conscious decision to jump. Researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have, for the first time, succeeded in measuring this 'Bereitschaftspotential' (readiness potential) outside a laboratory and under extreme conditions. Results from this research have been published in Scientific Reports*. (2019-02-28)

National survey of emergency dept management of self-harm highlights successes, room for improvement
In a study published March 13 in JAMA Psychiatry, researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital describe the results of a national survey to evaluate how frequently evidence-based management practices are used in EDs when treating patients who present for self-harm. (2019-03-13)

Shaken, and stirred: Scaling up bioreactors' fluid dynamics
Bioreactors are used to produce different therapeutics in the biopharmaceutical and regenerative medicine industries. Drug development relies on small multi-well plates shaken around an orbital diameter, while production-scale bioreactors are agitated by stirring. These different methods yield different fluid dynamics. Researchers in the U.K. are starting to bridge this gap by applying analytical techniques for stirred bioreactors to the fluid dynamics of orbitally shaken bioreactors. They discuss their work in this week's Physics of Fluids. (2018-03-13)

Ancient rhinos roamed the Yukon
Paleontologists have used modern tools to identify the origins of a few fragments of teeth found more than four decades ago by a schoolteacher in the Yukon. (2019-10-31)

Paradigm shift needed for designing tsunami-resistant bridges
Researchers argue in a new study that a paradigm shift is needed for assessing bridges' tsunami risk. (2018-12-17)

Study offers pearls of wisdom in contested New York oyster restoration
A new study finds these stakeholder groups actually share many of the same concerns, notably risks to public health and the economy, while also acknowledging the potential ecological benefits. This means that both groups may be receptive to similar appeals for oyster restoration projects in the future. (2018-03-26)

A new way to see stress -- using supercomputers
Supercomputer simulations show that at the atomic level, material stress doesn't behave symmetrically. Widely-used atomic stress formulae significantly underestimate stress near stress concentrators such as dislocation core, crack tip, or interface, in a material under deformation. NSF-funded XSEDE-allocated Jetstream and Comet supercomputers simulate force interactions of Lennard-Jones perfect single crystal of 240,000 atoms. Study findings could help scientists design new materials such as glass or metal that doesn't ice up. (2018-11-30)

Ice age era bones recovered from underwater caves in Mexico
When the Panamanian land bridge formed around 3 million years ago, Southern Mexico was in the middle of a great biotic interchange of large animals from North and South America that crossed the continents in both directions. (2017-08-24)

Geological change confirmed as factor behind extensive diversity in tropical rainforests
The tropical rainforests of Central and South America are home to the largest diversity of plants on this planet. In a project undertaken by Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in collaboration with Dutch research institutions, the causes of this plant diversity were investigated by studying two closely related groups of trees of the Annonaceae family. (2018-02-26)

Next-gen steel under the microscope
Next-generation steel and metal alloys are a step closer to reality, thanks to an international research project involving a University of Queensland scientist. The work could overcome the problem of hydrogen alloy embrittlement that has led to catastrophic failures in major engineering and building projects. (2017-03-16)

When music makes male faces more attractive
Women rate photographs of male faces more attractive and are more likely to date the men pictured when they have previously heard music. Moreover, highly arousing music led to the largest effect on sexual attraction. A team of psychologists led by Manuela Marin (University of Innsbruck) and Helmut Leder (University of Vienna) explains the significance of this finding in relation to the origins of music in their latest publication in the scientific journal PLOS ONE. (2017-09-13)

Gravity research smooths car rides, creates jobs
Today's cars ride so smoothly that if you feel vibration you know something's amiss. That's because of extensive technology that automobile manufacturers use to cushion every pothole drivers are apt to encounter. Future rides should be even smoother, thanks to the contributions of Mark Bocko, an electrical engineer at the University of Rochester. (2000-02-21)

After 60 years, Isle Royale continues world's longest predator-prey study
The 2018 report is out: two wolves, almost 1,500 moose and an ecosystem in transition. In its 60th year, the research conducted at Isle Royale National Park is the longest running predator-prey study of its kind. (2018-05-17)

Got a coastal bridge to retrofit? There's an optimal approach for that
Life-cycle engineering pioneer Prof. Dan Frangopol and former PhD student Alysson Mondoro's research incorporates -- for the first time -- the three most common failure modes for bridges vulnerable to floods, hurricanes and tsunamis into a risk assessment framework to optimize retrofitting strategies. (2018-02-07)

Insect antibiotic provides new way to eliminate bacteria
An antibiotic called thanatin attacks the way the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is built. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now found out that this happens through a previously unknown mechanism. Thanatin, produced naturally by the spined soldier bug, can therefore be used to develop new classes of antibiotics. (2018-11-15)

Colombia peace deal brings new threat to country's rainforest
The historic peace treaty in Colombia which brought an end to half a century of violence has led to mass deforestation. Once FARC soldiers were disarmed, it led to a vacuum of power which is being exploited by large landowners who are now deforesting the area at an alarming rate to make way for farms and for the illegal growth of coca crops. An ecologically significant region of Colombia, is now at risk of disappearing. (2018-07-19)

Orangutans unique in movement through tree tops
Scientists at the Universities of Liverpool and Birmingham have found that orangutans move through the canopy of tropical forests in a completely different way to all other tree-dwelling primates. (2009-07-27)

Age-related racial disparity in suicide rates among US youth
Researchers investigated race-related differences in suicide rates in US youth. The researchers analyzed data separately for children ages 5-12 and adolescents ages 13-17. The suicide rate was roughly two times higher for black children compared with white children of the same age group. In contrast, the suicide rate for black adolescents was half that of white adolescents. The findings suggest the need for more research into contributing factors and targeted interventions for children. (2018-05-21)

How the Arctic Ocean became saline
The Arctic Ocean was once a gigantic freshwater lake. Only after the land bridge between Greenland and Scotland had submerged far enough did vast quantities of salt water pour in from the Atlantic. (2017-06-06)

How machine learning helped Surrey develop a new algorithm that could add life to bridges
A new algorithm developed by the University of Surrey could help structural engineers better monitor the health of bridges and alert them to when they need repair faster. (2018-04-16)

Lithium-oxygen battery technology charges ahead
A new report overcomes hurdles related to the electrochemistry underlying the lithium-oxygen battery, making it a little more likely this high-powered battery could be broadly adopted in years ahead. (2018-08-23)

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