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A bioengineered tattoo monitors blood calcium levels
Scientists have created a biomedical tattoo that becomes visible on the skin of mice in response to elevated levels of calcium in the blood. (2018-04-18)

3-D printed coral could help endangered reefs
Threats to coral reefs are everywhere--rising water temperatures, ocean acidification, coral bleaching, fishing and other human activities. But new research from the University of Delaware shows that 3-D printed coral can provide a structural starter kit for reef organisms and can become part of the landscape as fish and coral build their homes around the artificial coral. (2019-10-16)

How plants manage calcium may reduce effects of acid rain
A new understanding of how plants manage their internal calcium levels could lead to modifying plants to avoid damage from acid rain. The pollutant disrupts calcium balance in plants by leaching significant amounts of the mineral from leaves as well as the agricultural and forest soils the plants live in. (2007-03-09)

Clarifying how lithium ions ferry around in rechargeable batteries
IBS scientists observe the real-time ultrafast bonding of lithium ions with the solvents, in the same process that happens during charging and discharging of lithium batteries, and conclude that a new theory is needed. (2017-03-27)

Mitochondrial protein in cardiac muscle cells linked to heart failure, study finds
Reducing a protein found in the mitochondria of cardiac muscle cells initiates cardiac dysfunction and heart failure, a finding that could provide insight for new treatments for cardiovascular diseases, a study led by Georgia State University has shown. (2017-12-05)

Cracking eggshell nanostructure
How is it that fertilized chicken eggs manage to resist fracture from the outside, while at the same time, are weak enough to break from the inside during chick hatching? It's all in the eggshell's nanostructure, according to a new study led by McGill University scientists. (2018-03-30)

Scientists pinpoint how ocean acidification weakens coral skeletons
The rising acidity of the oceans threatens coral reefs by making it harder for corals to build their skeletons. A new study identifies the details of how ocean acidification affects coral skeletons, allowing scientists to predict more precisely where corals will be more vulnerable. (2018-01-29)

Study paves way for new therapies in fight against calcium disorders
A study led by researchers at Georgia State University provides new insights into the molecular basis of human diseases resulting from mutations in the calcium-sensing receptor, a protein found in cell membranes. (2016-05-31)

Methane seeps in the Canadian high Arctic
Cretaceous climate warming led to a significant methane release from the seafloor, indicating potential for similar destabilization of gas hydrates under modern global warming. A field campaign on the remote Ellef Ringnes Island, Canadian High Arctic, discovered an astounding number of methane seep mounds in Cretaceous age sediments. (2017-04-13)

In many countries, bone health may be at risk due to low calcium intake
At a special symposium held today at the World Congress on Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases in Krakow, Poland, experts discussed the findings of the newly launched IOF Global Map of Dietary Calcium Intake in Adults and the implications of low calcium intake for the global population. (2018-04-20)

Single-celled architects inspire new nanotechnology
ASU professor Hao Yan and his colleagues have designed a range of nanostructures resembling marine diatoms -- tiny unicellular creatures. To achieve this, they borrow techniques used by naturally-occurring diatoms to deposit layers of silica -- the primary constituent in glass -- in order to grow their intricate shells. Using a technique known as DNA origami, the group designed nanoscale platforms of various shapes to which particles of silica, drawn by electrical charge, could stick. (2018-07-16)

Diamond discovery under pressure
For the first time, scientists have found Earth's fourth most abundant mineral -- calcium silicate perovskite -- at Earth's surface. (2018-03-07)

Targeted drug therapy prevents exercise-induced arrhythmias
Researchers report this week in Nature Medicine that the clinically available drug flecainide prevents potentially lethal arrhythmias in patients with a specific type of exercise or stress-induced arrhythmia disorder called CPVT. (2009-03-29)

New guideline on calcium and vitamin D supplementation
A new evidence-based clinical guideline from the National Osteoporosis Foundation and the American Society for Preventive Cardiology says that calcium with or without vitamin D intake from food or supplements that does not exceed the tolerable upper level of intake should be considered safe from a cardiovascular standpoint. (2016-10-24)

Snapshot of past climate reveals no ice in Antarctica millions of years ago
A snapshot of New Zealand's climate 40 million years ago reveals a greenhouse Earth, with warmer seas and little or no ice in Antarctica. A new study led by Cardiff University suggests Antarctica at that time was yet to develop extensive ice sheets. (2008-07-28)

3-D protein structure offers insight into rapid communication by brain cells
New HHMI research reveals how three proteins help brain cells synchronize the release of chemical signals. A similar interaction may play a role in how cells secrete insulin and airway mucus, too. (2017-09-13)

How sponges undermine coral reefs from within
Coral reefs are demolished from within, by bio-eroding sponges. Seeking refuge from predators, these sponges bore tunnels into the carbonate coral structures, thus weakening the reefs. Scientists from the Royal NIOZ Netherlands Institute for Sea Research have uncovered how the sponges hollow out and take over reef skeletons. This finding, published in Scientific Reports on Jan. 24, helps to explain why sponges erode reefs faster as atmospheric CO2 levels rise. (2019-01-25)

Visible signals from brain and heart
Key processes in the body are controlled by the concentration of calcium in and around cells. A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Helmholtz Zentrum München have developed the first sensor molecule that is able to visualize calcium in living animals with the help of a radiation-free imaging technique known as optoacoustics. The method does not require the cells to be genetically modified and involves no radiation exposure. (2017-11-30)

Immune deficiency and balance disorder result from single gene defect
A genetic defect that causes a severe immune deficiency in humans may also produce balance disorders, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Iowa, the Jackson Laboratory and East Carolina University. (2008-02-21)

Hot springs microbes hold key to dating sedimentary rocks, researchers say
Scientists studying microbial communities and the growth of sedimentary rock at Mammoth Hot Springs in Yellowstone National Park have made a surprising discovery about the geological record of life and the environment. Their discovery could affect how certain sequences of sedimentary rock are dated, and how scientists might search for evidence of life on other planets. (2008-01-22)

'Aquatic osteoporosis' jellifying lakes
North American lakes are suffering from declining calcium levels, says new research from Queen's University. (2014-11-19)

Calcium testing in coronary arteries better way to predict heart attacks than stress testing alone
Researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute in Salt Lake City have found that incorporating underused, but available, imaging technologies more precisely predicts who's at risk for heart attacks and similar threats -- in time to prevent them. (2018-03-12)

Evidence lacking to support 'lead diet'
Writing in the Journal of Pediatrics, UB researcher says public health experts need to be more up front with parents in explaining that CDC dietary recommendations may not help children who have been exposed to lead. (2017-03-07)

Memory of the Venus flytrap
In a study to be published in Nature Plants, a graduate student Mr. Hiraku Suda and Professor Mitsuyasu Hasebe of the National Institute for Basic Biology (NIBB) in Okazaki, Japan, together with their colleagues, have succeeded in visualizing intracellular calcium concentrations in the Venus flytrap and have demonstrated that its short-term memory can indeed be explained by changes in calcium concentration. (2020-10-05)

New research indicates likely hydrological implications of rapid global warming
Researchers studying a rapid global warming event, around 56 million years ago, have shown evidence of major changes in the intensity of rainfall and flood events. The findings indicate some of the likely implications should current trends of rising carbon dioxide and global warming continue. (2017-11-20)

Fossilised plant leaf wax provides new tool for understanding ancient climates
New research, published in Scientific Reports, has outlined a new methodology for estimating ancient atmospheric water content based on fossil plant leaf waxes. (2018-03-02)

Ocean acidification study offers warnings for marine life, habitats
Acidification of the world's oceans could drive a cascading loss of biodiversity in marine habitats, according to research published today in Nature Climate Change. The work by researchers from the University of British Columbia and colleagues in the US, Europe, Australia, Japan and China, combines dozens of existing studies to paint a more nuanced picture of ocean acidification. (2016-11-21)

Stalagmites may predict next Big One along the New Madrid Seismic Zone
Small white stalagmites lining caves in the Midwest may help scientists chronicle the history of the New Madrid Seismic Zone -- and even predict when the next big earthquake may strike, say researchers at the Illinois State Geological Survey and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Preliminary results of the study will be presented Sun., Oct. 5, at the 2008 Joint Meeting of GSA-SSSA/ASA/CSSA-GCAS in Houston, Texas. (2008-09-25)

New MRI sensor can image activity deep within the brain
MIT researchers have developed an MRI-based calcium sensor that allows them to peer deep into the brain. Using this technique, they can track electrical activity inside the neurons of living animals, enabling them to link neural activity with specific behaviors. (2019-02-22)

Epilepsy: Triangular relationship in the brain
When an epileptic seizure occurs in the brain, the nerve cells lose their usual pattern and fire in a very fast rhythm. The cause is a complex interplay of various factors. Scientists at the University of Bonn have now discovered the important role of one of the participants: α2δ4 (alpha2delta4). It is a puzzle piece that plays a decisive role in the development of epilepsies and is a possible starting point for therapies. (2019-02-25)

Guideline: Vertigo can be treated easily and quickly
A new guideline developed by the American Academy of Neurology found that the best treatment for vertigo is the easiest and quickest one. The guideline on benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, an inner ear disorder that is a common cause of dizziness, is published in the May 27, 2008, issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2008-05-26)

Coral reef experiment shows: Acidification from carbon dioxide slows growth
Ocean acidification will severely impair coral reef growth before the end of the century if carbon dioxide emissions continue unchecked. The paper represents the first ocean acidification experiment in which seawater was made artificially acidic by the addition of carbon dioxide and then allowed to flow across a natural coral reef community. The acidity of the seawater was increased to reflect end-of-century projections if carbon dioxide from greenhouse gas emissions are not abated. (2018-03-14)

Coral reefs at risk of losing building material by end of century
A new study suggests that by 2050, most coral reefs around the world are at risk of experiencing constant depletion of one of their building blocks - calcium carbonate sediments. (2018-02-22)

Weathering of rocks by mosses may explain climate effects during the Late Ordovician
During the Ordovician period, the concentration of CO2 in the earth's atmosphere was about eight times higher than today. It has been hard to explain why the climate cooled and why the Ordovician glaciations took place. A new study, published in Nature Communications, shows that the weathering of rock caused by early non-vascular plants had the potential to cause such a global cooling effect. (2016-07-07)

How enzymes communicate
Freiburg scientists explain the cell mechanism that transforms electrical signals into chemical ones. (2017-05-18)

Penn-led team uncovers the physiology behind the hour-long mating call of midshipman fish
A new study led by University of Pennsylvania researchers provides an explanation for how Pacific midshipman fish can generate a mating call that emits continuously from their bodies for a full hour, entailing 360,000 muscle contractions. (2018-01-12)

Two papers describe how a membrane protein can move both lipids and ions
The TMEM16 family of membrane proteins was hailed as representing the elusive calcium-activated chloride channels. However, the majority of the family members turned out to be scramblases, proteins that shuffle lipids between both sides of a lipid membrane, some also with non-selective ion conductance. A new study on proteins of the TMEM16 family, published in two back-to-back papers in the journal eLife, shows what the structures of these proteins reveal about their function. (2019-03-12)

An amino acid controls plants' breath
IBS plant scientists demonstrate that the amino acid L-methionine activates a calcium-channel regulating the opening and closing of tiny plant pores. (2016-12-06)

The dinosaur menu, as revealed by calcium
By studying calcium in fossil remains in deposits in Morocco and Niger, researchers have been able to reconstruct the food chains of the past, thus explaining how so many predators could coexist in the dinosaurs' time. This study was conducted by researchers from the CNRS, ENS de Lyon and Claude Bernard Lyon 1 University, in partnership with the French National Museum of Natural History and Sorbonne University. (2018-04-11)

NREL research overcomes major technical obstacles in magnesium-metal batteries
Scientists at the Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have discovered a new approach for developing a rechargeable non-aqueous magnesium-metal battery. (2018-04-03)

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