Popular Cambridge News and Current Events

Popular Cambridge News and Current Events, Cambridge News Articles.
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AI 'scientist' finds that toothpaste ingredient may help fight drug-resistant malaria
An ingredient commonly found in toothpaste could be employed as an anti-malarial drug against strains of malaria parasite that have grown resistant to one of the currently used drugs. This discovery, led by researchers at the University of Cambridge, was aided by Eve, an artificially intelligent 'robot scientist.' (2018-01-18)

New 3D imaging analysis technique could lead to improved arthritis treatment
An algorithm to monitor the joints of patients with arthritis, which could change the way that the severity of the condition is assessed, has been developed by a team of engineers, physicians and radiologists led by the University of Cambridge. (2018-06-18)

Map of teenage brain provides evidence of link between antisocial behavior and brain development
The brains of teenagers with serious antisocial behavior problems differ significantly in structure to those of their peers, providing the clearest evidence to date that their behavior stems from changes in brain development in early life, according to new research led by the University of Cambridge and the University of Southampton, in collaboration with the University of Rome Tor Vergata in Italy. (2016-06-15)

Traumatic childhood may increase the risk of drug addiction
Previous research has shown that personality traits such as impulsivity or compulsiveness are indicators of an increased risk of addiction. Now, new research from the University of Cambridge suggests that these impulsive and compulsive personality traits are also associated with a traumatic upbringing during childhood. The study was published today, 31 August, in the journal American Journal Psychiatry. (2012-08-31)

New brain mapping technique highlights relationship between connectivity and IQ
A new and relatively simple technique for mapping the wiring of the brain has shown a correlation between how well connected an individual's brain regions are and their intelligence, say researchers at the University of Cambridge. (2018-01-02)

Test can identify patients in intensive care at risk of life-threatening infections
Patients in intensive care units are at significant risk of potentially life-threatening secondary infections, including from antibiotic-resistant bacteria such as MRSA and C. difficile. Now, a new test could identify those at greatest risk -- and speed up the development of new therapies to help at-risk patients. (2018-06-13)

New research lights up chronic bacterial infection inside bone
A new study describes how live animal imaging allows researchers to visualize chronic bacterial infection in the bone marrow of mice. (2008-12-22)

Technology may help increase number of kidneys transplanted
Many deceased donor kidneys are declined for transplantation because of concerns over their quality, but a new BJS (British Journal of Surgery) study found that a technique called normothermic machine perfusion can assess the quality of a kidney and determine its suitability for transplantation. (2017-12-06)

Muscle more important than fat in regulating heat loss from the hands
New study suggests that people with more muscle mass are less susceptible to heat loss and heat up faster after cold exposure than non-muscular individuals. (2018-02-14)

'Keep it local' approach more effective than government schemes at protecting rainforest
Conservation initiatives led by local and indigenous groups can be just as effective as schemes led by government, according to new research. In some cases in the Amazon rainforest, grassroots initiatives can be even more effective at protecting this vital ecosystem. (2017-09-12)

The Lancet Infectious Diseases: Oldest ever schistosomiasis egg found may be first proof of early human technology exacerbating disease burden
The discovery of a schistosomiasis parasite egg in a 6200-year-old grave at a prehistoric town by the Euphrates river in Syria may be the first evidence that agricultural irrigation systems in the Middle East contributed to disease burden, according to new Correspondence published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases. (2014-06-19)

Think of honeybees as 'livestock,' not wildlife, argue experts
Contrary to public perception, die-offs in honeybee colonies are an agricultural not a conservation issue, argue Cambridge researchers, who say that manged honeybees may contribute to the genuine biodiversity crisis of Europe's declining wild pollinators. (2018-01-25)

Immune cell steroids help tumours suppress the immune system, offering new drug targets
Tumours found to evade the immune system by telling immune cells to produce immunosuppressive steroids. Researchers discovered that immune T cells from mouse skin and breast tumours secrete steroids, and that preventing this steroid production reduced growth of tumours in mice. The study found that either removing a key steroid-producing gene, or switching it off with a drug, dramatically slowed the formation or progression of cancers, revealing potential immunotherapy drug targets. (2020-07-30)

Scientists determine structure of brain receptor implicated in epilepsy and PMT
Scientists funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council have published new research in the journal Molecular Pharmacology identifying the structure of a receptor in the brain implicated in conditions such as epilepsy and pre-menstrual tension. The same receptor has also been reported to be highly sensitive to alcohol. (2008-03-09)

Genetic body/brain connection identified in genomic region linked to autism
For the first time, Whitehead Institute scientists have documented a direct link between deletions in two genes--fam57ba and doc2a--in zebrafish and certain brain and body traits, such as seizures, hyperactivity, large head size, and increased fat content. Both genes reside in the 16p11.2 region of the genome, which has been linked to multiple brain and body disorders in humans, including autism spectrum disorder, developmental delays, seizures, and obesity. (2017-10-06)

New expert guidance on contact precautions for drug-resistant infections
New expert guidance released today by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America advises hospitals on determining when they can safely discontinue contact precautions for patients with multi-drug resistant bacteria. The framework, published in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, addresses how long hospital staff should use these safety protocols to reduce the spread of potentially deadly organisms within the hospital. The guidance also outlines the use of molecular testing that is guiding these care decisions. (2018-01-11)

New studies aim to boost social science methods in conservation research
Scientists have produced a series of papers designed to improve research on conservation and the environment. (2018-01-11)

Distinct human mutations can alter the effect of medicine
About one third of all medicine binds to the same type of receptor in the human body. An estimated 3 percent of the population have receptors of this type that are so genetically different that they are predisposed to altered, ineffective or adverse responses to medicine, a new study from the University of Copenhagen and the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge shows. (2017-12-15)

Study at Johns Hopkins hospital leads to changes in reporting patient safety concerns
In a case study published online last week in Academic Medicine, an international team of researchers led by the University of Cambridge and Johns Hopkins Medicine looked at what prevented employees from raising concerns. (2018-09-20)

Genes play a role in empathy
A new study led by scientists from the University of Cambridge, the Institut Pasteur, Paris Diderot University, the CNRS and the genetics company 23andMe suggests that our empathy is not just a result of our education and experience but is also partly influenced by genetic variations. These results will be published in the journal Translational Psychiatry on March 12, 2018. (2018-03-11)

Children from disadvantaged backgrounds do less vigorous physical activity
Children from disadvantaged backgrounds and certain ethnic minority backgrounds, including from Pakistani and Bangladeshi backgrounds, have lower levels of vigorous physical activity, according to researchers at the University of Cambridge. (2019-05-27)

The neuroscience of cuttlefish camouflage
Unlike squid, bottom-dwelling cuttlefish may be able to put one key aspect of their camouflage on autopilot. Marine Biological Laboratory and University of Cambridge researchers report that these cephalopods can lock in the 3-D textured shape of their dynamic skin for over an hour without nervous system input. This physiology is thought to help cuttlefish save energy as they camouflage from predators, wait for prey, or digest food. The study appears Feb. 15 in iScience. (2018-02-15)

Green material for refrigeration identified
Researchers from the UK and Spain have identified an eco-friendly solid that could replace the inefficient and polluting gases used in most refrigerators and air conditioners. (2019-04-18)

Three-dimensional nanomagnets for the computer of tomorrow
Since the late 60's electronic devices have stored and transmitted information (bits) in two-dimensional circuits. Now, researchers at the University of Cambridge have been able to break this barrier by creating a nanoscale magnetic circuit capable of moving information along the three dimensions of space. This breakthrough could lead to an important increase in storage and processing capacities of electronic devices over those used today. (2017-11-15)

Bones show prehistoric women's intensive manual labor during advent of agriculture
Comparisons of bone strength between prehistoric women and living female athletes demonstrate that prehistoric women performed rigorous manual labor for thousands of years in central Europe at levels exceeding those of modern women. (2017-11-29)

What are the likely effects of Brexit on UK regions?
A new Papers in Regional Science article that highlights the possible implications of Brexit for the UK and its regions notes that the results for the UK economy may not be as damaging as some forecasters say. (2017-11-22)

Lizards, mice, bats and other vertebrates are important pollinators too
Although less familiar as flower visitors than insect pollinators, vertebrate pollinators are more likely to have coevolved tight relationships of high value to the plants they service, supplying essential reproductive aid for which few or no other species may substitute. (2018-04-04)

Study finds that genes play a role in empathy
A new study published today suggests that how empathic we are is not just a result of our upbringing and experience but also partly a result of our genes. (2018-03-11)

SRC-1 gene variants linked to human obesity
Researchers have discovered how the gene SRC-1 affects body weight control. (2019-04-12)

New hope for multiple sclerosis sufferers
A drug which was developed in Cambridge and initially designed to treat a form of leukemia has also proven effective against combating the debilitating neurological disease multiple sclerosis. (2008-10-22)

Wired for obesity
In a multi-center collaboration, scientists at Children's Hospital Los Angeles and University of Cambridge discover a set of genes that help to establish brain connections governing body weight. (2019-01-17)

Bullying evolves with age and proves difficult to escape from
An international team from the Universities of Cordoba, Cambridge and Zurich conducted a study on bullying roles among peers. Children who are involved in bullying at age 11, may remain involved throughout their entire adolescence (2019-03-14)

Study shows inappropriate antibiotic prescribing differs by patient age, insurance, race
A patient's age and race are associated with risk of receiving an unneeded antibiotic prescription for upper respiratory conditions caused by viruses, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. Additionally, the study found that advanced practice providers, such as nurse practitioners and physician assistants, are 15 percent more likely than physician providers to prescribe antibiotics to adults. (2018-01-30)

Electronic health records decision support reduces inappropriate use of GI test
Programming a hospital's electronic health record system (EHR) to provide information on appropriate use of a costly gastrointestinal panel and to block unnecessary orders reduced inappropriate testing by 46% and saved up to $168,000 over 15 months, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. (2019-04-23)

Scientists link genes to brain anatomy in autism
A team of scientists at the University of Cambridge has discovered that specific genes are linked to individual differences in brain anatomy in autistic children. (2018-02-27)

Graphene mobile innovation wows at the GSMA Mobile World Congress
The Graphene Experience Zone proved a show highlight to many at the 2017 GSMA Mobile World Congress (MWC). Containing an impressive collection of demonstrators and prototypes, it showcased graphene mobile innovation in a truly interactive way. Organized by the Graphene Flagship and curated by ICFO, with support from the GSMA, the Graphene Experience Zone highlighted the potential of graphene and related materials to the mobile community. (2017-03-30)

Tough stuff: Spider silk enhanced with graphene-based materials
Natural spider silk has excellent mechanical properties. Researchers from the Graphene Flagship have found a way to boost the strength of spider's silk using graphene-based materials, paving the way for a novel class of high-performance bionic composites. (2017-09-13)

NASA's new planet hunter snaps initial test image, swings by Moon toward final orbit
After launching April 18, TESS has completed its lunar flyby to put it on track for its final science orbit, and has released a first test image. (2018-05-18)

Study finds two ancient populations that diverged later 'reconverged' in the Americas
A new genetic study of ancient individuals in the Americas and their contemporary descendants finds that two populations that diverged from one another 18,000 to 15,000 years ago remained apart for millennia before mixing again. This historic ;reconvergence; occurred before or during their expansion to the southern continent. (2018-05-31)

Fully integrated circuits printed directly onto fabric
Researchers have successfully incorporated washable, stretchable and breathable electronic circuits into fabric, opening up new possibilities for smart textiles and wearable electronics. The circuits were made with cheap, safe and environmentally friendly inks, and printed using conventional inkjet printing techniques. (2017-11-08)

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