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Popular Cambridge News and Current Events, Cambridge News Articles.
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Providers preferences may be helpful in reducing inappropriate antibiotic prescriptions
Physicians are open to receiving information on their antibiotic prescribing patterns, but have specific preference for receiving that information, according to results from a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. Anticipating physicians' preferences for feedback on antimicrobial use (AU) could help optimize impact of antibiotic stewardship programs and improve the use of antibiotics. (2018-06-07)

Fully integrated circuits printed directly onto fabric
Researchers have successfully incorporated washable, stretchable and breathable electronic circuits into fabric, opening up new possibilities for smart textiles and wearable electronics. The circuits were made with cheap, safe and environmentally friendly inks, and printed using conventional inkjet printing techniques. (2017-11-08)

Study shows nurses' scrubs become contaminated with bacteria in hospitals
Clothing worn by healthcare providers can become contaminated with bacteria, however having nurses wear scrubs with antimicrobial properties did not prevent this bacterial contamination from occurring, according to a study published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. (2017-08-29)

Method to predict drug stability could lead to more effective medicines
Researchers from the UK and Denmark have developed a new method to predict the physical stability of drug candidates, which could help with the development of new and more effective medicines for patients. The technology has been licensed to Cambridge spin-out company TeraView, who are developing it for use in the pharmaceutical industry in order to make medicines that are more easily released in the body. (2018-03-05)

Scientists discover promising off-switch for inflammation
The switch puts the brake on overactive immune cells at the heart of many inflammatory diseases such as arthritis, IBD, and heart disease. The scientists behind the discovery are now keen to explore whether the findings can be exploited in the effort to develop new anti-inflammatory medicines. (2018-03-28)

Silk 'micrococoons' could be used in biotechnology and medicine
Microscopic versions of the cocoons spun by silkworms have been manufactured by a team of researchers. The tiny capsules, which are invisible to the naked eye, can protect sensitive molecular materials, and could prove a significant technology in areas including food science, biotechnology and medicine. (2017-07-19)

Human drugs could help treat transmissible cancers in Tasmanian devils
Transmissible cancers are incredibly rare in nature, yet have arisen in Tasmanian devils on at least two separate occasions. New research from the University of Cambridge identifies key anti-cancer drugs which could be trialled as a treatment for these diseases, which are threatening Tasmanian devils with extinction. (2018-04-09)

Scientists harness solar power to produce clean hydrogen from biomass
A team of scientists at the University of Cambridge has developed a way of using solar power to generate a fuel that is both sustainable and relatively cheap to produce. It's using natural light to generate hydrogen from biomass. (2017-03-13)

Suicide can't be predicted by asking about suicidal thoughts, major Australian study shows
A major Australian study from UNSW Sydney shows that most people who died of suicide dismissed expressing suicidal thoughts to health professionals, prompting calls to review the way treatment is managed and resourced. (2019-02-01)

Inflammation in the brain linked to several forms of dementia
Inflammation in the brain may be more widely implicated in dementias than was previously thought, suggests new research from the University of Cambridge. The researchers say it offers hope for potential new treatments for several types of dementia. (2020-03-16)

Cooperation helps mammals survive in tough environments
New research suggests that cooperative breeding makes mammal species such as meerkats better suited to dry, harsh climates. (2017-01-24)

High prevalence of CRE in Washington, D.C. healthcare facilities
Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), a family of highly pathogenic antibiotic-resistant organisms, are endemic across Washington, D.C. healthcare facilities, with 5.2 percent of inpatients testing positive for the bacteria, according to new research published online today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. (2017-06-15)

Fake news 'vaccine': Online game may 'inoculate' by simulating propaganda tactics
A new experiment, launching today online, aims to help 'inoculate' against disinformation by providing a small dose of perspective from a (2018-02-19)

What causes the sound of a dripping tap -- and how do you stop it?
Scientists have solved the riddle behind one of the most recognisable, and annoying, household sounds: the dripping tap. And crucially, they have also identified a simple solution to stop it, which most of us already have in our kitchens. (2018-06-22)

Nerve study shows how cells adapt to help repair damage
Genetic processes that allow cells to transform so they can mend damaged nerves have been identified by scientists. (2017-10-05)

Steroid study sheds light on long term side effects of medicines
Fresh insights into key hormones found in commonly prescribed medicines have been discovered, providing further understanding of the medicines' side effects. (2017-12-13)

Exploring defects in nanoscale devices for possible quantum computing applications
Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology in collaboration with the University of Cambridge have studied the interaction between microwave fields and electronic defect states inside the oxide layer of field-effect transistors at cryogenic temperatures. It has been found that the physics of such defect states are consistent with driven two-level systems possessing long coherence times, and that their induced dynamics can be coherently and independently controlled. (2016-10-19)

Antibiotic resistance increases relapse in urinary tract infections
Patients with a certain drug-resistant urinary tract infection were more likely to have a relapse of their infection within a week than those with non-resistant infections and were more likely to be prescribed an incorrect antibiotic according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. (2018-10-30)

Rare mineral discovered in plants for first time
A rare mineral that holds enticing potential as a new material for industrial and medical applications has been discovered on alpine plants at Cambridge University Botanic Garden. (2018-03-05)

Research uncovers new weed control options for strawberry growers
Since the 2005 ban of methyl bromide by federal regulators, winter strawberry growers have had limited options for managing broadleaf weeds, grasses and nutsedge species. But new research featured in the journal Weed Technology shows drip-applied herbicides may help to fill the gap. (2017-11-30)

Political instability and weak governance lead to loss of species, study finds
Big data study of global biodiversity shows ineffective national governance is a better indicator of species decline than any other measure of 'anthropogenic impact.' Even protected conservation areas make little difference in countries that struggle with socio-political stability. (2017-12-20)

Study confirms link between traumatic brain injury and dementia
The risk of dementia, including Alzheimer's, was significantly higher in people who had experienced a traumatic brain injury (TBI) than with people who had no history of TBI, according to one of the largest studies to date on that association. (2018-04-10)

Polymer crystals hold key to record-breaking energy transport
Scientists from the universities of Bristol and Cambridge have found a way to create polymeric semiconductor nanostructures that absorb light and transport its energy further than previously observed. (2018-05-24)

NASA's TESS presents panorama of southern sky
The glow of the Milky Way -- our galaxy seen edgewise -- arcs across a sea of stars in a new mosaic of the southern sky produced from a year of observations by NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS). Constructed from 208 TESS images, the panorama reveals both the beauty of the cosmic landscape and the reach of TESS's cameras. (2019-11-05)

Pioneering new technique could boost understanding of causes of heart disease
The complex and mysterious mechanisms that drive communication and reactions within human cells could be on the verge of being unravelled, due to a pioneering new technique. (2018-01-09)

Mindfulness training reduces stress during exam time, Cambridge study finds
Mindfulness training can help support students at risk of mental health problems, concludes a randomized controlled trial carried out by researchers at the University of Cambridge. (2017-12-18)

Ultra-white coating modelled on beetle scales
Researchers have developed a super-thin, non-toxic, lightweight, edible ultra-white coating that could be used to make brighter paints and coatings, for use in the cosmetic, food or pharmaceutical industries. (2018-03-13)

Gender inequality is 'drowning out' the voices of women scientists
A University of Cambridge researcher is calling for the voices of women to be given a fairer platform at a leading scientific conference. (2018-04-24)

Mouse study identifies new target for human accelerated aging syndrome
Scientists from the University of Cambridge have identified a potential therapeutic target in the devastating genetic disease Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS), which is characterized by premature aging. (2018-04-27)

How the cuttlefish spikes out its skin: Neurological study reveals surprising control
Wouldn't it be useful to suddenly erect 3-D spikes out of your skin, hold them for an hour, then even faster retract them and swim away? Octopus and cuttlefish can do this as a camouflage tactic. A new study clarifies the neural and muscular mechanisms that underlie this extraordinary defense tactic, conducted by scientists from the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL), Woods Hole, and the University of Cambridge, UK, and published in iScience. (2018-02-15)

Some superconductors can also carry currents of 'spin'
Researchers have shown that certain superconductors -- materials that carry electrical current with zero resistance at very low temperatures -- can also carry currents of 'spin'. The successful combination of superconductivity and spin could lead to a revolution in high-performance computing, by dramatically reducing energy consumption. (2018-04-16)

Kidney cancer's developmental source revealed
In the first experiment of its kind, scientists have revealed the precise identity of cancer cells of the most common childhood and adult kidney cancers. Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, the University of Cambridge and their collaborators showed the cancer cells are versions of specific healthy cells from developing or adult kidneys. Reported in Science, this study could lead to the development of completely new methods of treating kidney cancers. (2018-08-09)

Scientists pioneer a new way to turn sunlight into fuel
A new study, led by academics at St John's College, University of Cambridge, used semi-artificial photosynthesis to explore new ways to produce and store solar energy. They used natural sunlight to convert water into hydrogen and oxygen using a mixture of biological components and manmade technologies. (2018-09-03)

Stem cell study could aid motor neurone disease research
Scientists have discovered a new way to generate human motor nerve cells in a development that will help research into motor neurone disease. A team from the universities of Edinburgh, Cambridge and Cardiff has created a range of motor neurons -- nerves cells that send messages from the brain and spine to other parts of the body -- from human embryonic stem cells in the laboratory. (2011-03-01)

Scientists discover the secrets behind the cuttlefish's 3-D 'invisibility cloak'
An international team of scientists has identified the neural circuits that enable cuttlefish to change their appearance in just the blink to eye -- and discovered that this is similar to the neural circuit that controls iridescence in squids. (2018-02-15)

Telehealth helps promote safe antibiotic prescribing practices in remote healthcare
A pilot project at two rural VA medical centers demonstrated that telehealth videoconferencing promoted antibiotic stewardship efforts by linking remote facilities to infectious diseases-trained professionals, according to a study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. Antibiotic stewardship helps promote safe prescribing practices to prevent adverse medication events and reduce antibiotic resistance. (2018-09-06)

New markers of climate change
Epiphytes (plants without roots) are being investigated for their use as markers of climate change in rainforests. Monica Mejia-Chang from Cambridge University, UK, will present her research on how changes in photosynthesis and water evaporation in these plants could indicate the effects of climate change over the past 50 years. (2005-07-12)

The brain puts the memories warehouse in order while we sleep
During the hours of sleep the memory performs a cleaning shift. A study led by a Spanish scientist at the University of Cambridge reveals that when we sleep, the neural connections that collect important information are strengthened and those created from irrelevant data are weakened until they get lost. (2018-03-15)

Certain iron supplements may influence the development of colon cancer
Two common iron compounds increase the formation of a known biomarker for cancer, according to a new study of cancer cells from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden. The two compounds, ferric citrate and ferric EDTA, are often used in dietary supplements and as a food additive respectively, in worldwide markets including the USA and the EU. (2018-04-12)

Micro to macro mapping -- Observing past landscapes via remote-sensing
New multi-scale relief modelling algorithm helps archaeologists rediscover topographical features of the past. (2018-02-08)

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