Popular Candidates News and Current Events

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Amateur astronomer's data helps scientists discover a new exoplanet
Scientists of the international project 'Kourovka Planet Search,' organized at Kourovka Astronomical Observatory of Ural Federal University, discovered a new planet outside the solar system (exoplanet). (2018-05-17)

Designing new materials from 'small' data
A Northwestern and Los Alamos team developed a novel workflow combining machine learning and density functional theory calculations to create design guidelines for new materials that exhibit useful electronic properties, such as ferroelectricity and piezoelectricity. (2017-02-17)

Dyslexia does not reduce pass rates for UK GP licensing exam
A study led by academics at the University of Lincoln has found that UK GPs who declare dyslexia prior to taking the AKT are just as likely to pass the knowledge component of the licensing exam as their counterparts. Candidates who declared dyslexia after initially failing the exam were more likely to be minority ethnic candidates with a primary medical qualification outside of the UK. (2018-02-12)

Optical Atomic Clock: A long look at the captured atoms
In the case of one of the candidates for an optical clock which is developed at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, an optical grating clock with strontium atoms, the loading of cold atoms into an optical grating has been optimized to such an extent that approx. 106 strontium atoms are loaded into the grating within 150 milliseconds at a temperature of a few microkelvin. There, the atoms remain stored for over one second and are available for a precision measurement of the optical frequency. (2008-02-05)

The absence of ants -- Entomologist confirms first Saharan farming 10,000 years ago
Dr Stefano Vanin was part of an international team working on discoveries at the Holocene age hunter-gatherer site at Takarkori in south-western Libya. (2018-03-16)

Program will train mental health providers, improve health care in rural Missouri
A new graduate education program at the University of Missouri has received nearly $700,000 from the Health Resources and Services Administration in the US Department of Health and Human Services to train psychology doctoral candidates in integrated, primary health care settings, in an effort to improve health care for underserved populations with mental health and physical disorders. (2016-08-09)

Selection and reselection processes of executive political positions are gender biased
Although male over-representation in politics is a worldwide phenomenon, the executive is the most male-dominated branch. There have been very few women presidents and prime ministers. The figure has stagnated since 1990 at twenty female national leaders per year. In recent years their presence has even decreased: in December 2017 there were only thirteen female leaders of their respective country. (2019-01-11)

Hubble finds 16 candidate extrasolar planets far across our Galaxy
The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has discovered 16 extrasolar planet candidates that are orbiting a variety of distant stars. In accomplishing this, Hubble looked farther into our Milky Way galaxy than has ever successfully been done before in searching for extrasolar planets. (2006-10-06)

McMaster University engineers make drug testing more efficient and affordable
McMaster University engineers have devised a way to make testing for new drugs more efficient and affordable, and reduce the time for helpful medications to reach the public. (2018-02-09)

The brain auditions different cells when learning a task, some don't make the cut
For decades, neuroscientists have wondered how the brain can continue to learn new skills without needing to grow in size or volume over a person's lifetime. Evidence suggests that the number of brain cells -- neurons, synapses, and glial cells -- does initially increase as we're learning, but many are eventually pruned away or assigned to other roles. Researchers in Germany and Sweden present this theory Nov. 14 in the review journal Trends in Cognitive Sciences. (2017-11-14)

Using drugs for different diseases than initially intended for
Thousands of drugs have the potential to be effective against other diseases than they were developed for. New scientific work points to ca. 30,000 such cases. One is currently used to treat schizophrenia but holds great potential for treating tuberculosis as well. (2016-11-29)

Gun owners are more politically active, study finds
American gun owners in recent years have exhibited higher levels of political participation, not only in voting but in donating money to candidates and contacting elected officials, according to a study by University of Kansas political scientists. (2018-09-02)

UGA, Sanofi Pasteur develop new broadly protective vaccines for H3N2 influenza
Researchers have developed a vaccine candidate that protects against multiple co-circulating strains of H3N2 influenza isolated over five seasons following testing in mouse and ferret models. (2017-11-02)

Study says charisma trumped narcissism for voters in 2016 US presidential election
A new study of the 2016 US presidential election suggests that narcissism and charisma are both important predictors of voter choice. Researchers found that attributed charisma may serve as a balance to narcissism. Thus, followers of a candidate potentially look beyond negative leadership qualities to select those leaders who they perceive to have redeeming positive attributes and values. (2018-04-10)

'The dark side' of quantum computers
The era of fully fledged quantum computers threatens to destroy internet security as we know it. Researchers are in a race against time to prepare new cryptographic techniques before the arrival of quantum computers, as cryptographers Tanja Lange (Eindhoven University of Technology, the Netherlands) and Daniel J. Bernstein (University of Illinois at Chicago, USA) describe today in the journal Nature. In their publication they analyze the options available for this so-called post-quantum cryptography. (2017-09-13)

Catching the right fish
ETH researchers have developed a method to examine millions of potential self-produced drug candidates in one go. (2018-03-28)

Candidate voice pitch influences voters, but does not lead to better leaders
Voters may prefer voting for candidates with lower sounding voices but they are not necessarily better leaders, a paper recently published in the journal Evolution and Human Behavior by University of Miami Professor Casey Klofstad and Professor Rindy Anderson from Florida Atlantic University has revealed. (2018-03-14)

New study challenges popular theory about dwarf galaxies
A new international study involving The Australian National University (ANU) has found a plane of dwarf galaxies orbiting around Centaurus A in a discovery that challenges a popular theory about how dwarf galaxies are spread around the Universe. (2018-02-01)

Fit older adults are more active
Fitness level has the strongest association with physical activity, followed by gender and season. (2015-11-16)

Mortality of surgery vs. targeted radiation in early lung cancer patients
Among patients older than 80 years, 3.9 percent receiving surgery passed away within the 30-day post-treatment window, compared with 0.9 percent of patients receiving focused radiation. (2018-01-19)

Curiosity can predict employees' ability to creatively solve problems, research shows
Employers who are looking to hire creative problem-solvers should consider candidates with strong curiosity traits, and personality tests may be one way to tease out those traits in prospective employees, new research from Oregon State University shows. (2016-11-17)

Astronomers find 2 large planets, plus possible super-Earth-size one
A team of three University of Florida astronomers contributed to the Kepler spacecraft's discovery of two Saturn-sized planets, plus a possible third planet with a radius just one-and-a-half times that of Earth, orbiting a distant star. (2010-08-26)

Donor hearts at increased disease risk offer better survival rates for transplant recipients
Accepting an organ that has an increased risk of potentially transmitting disease offers a higher one-year survival rate for candidates on the heart transplant list over waiting for an organ with less risk, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Increased risk donors make up a growing number in the donor pool for organs, offering a potential strategy to reduce waitlist mortality for patients awaiting transplant. (2018-10-29)

Gay men and lesbian women less likely to be employed in a leadership position
Gay men and lesbian women face discrimination when seeking leadership positions due to the sound of their voice, a new study in the Archives of Sexual Behaviour has found. (2017-03-20)

Speeding up material discovery
Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed an algorithm that can discover and optimize thermoelectic materials for energy conversion in a matter of months, relying on solving quantum mechanical equations, without any experimental input. (2018-04-26)

Hubble finds clues to the birth of supermassive black holes
Astrophysicists have taken a major step forward in understanding how supermassive black holes formed. Using data from Hubble and two other space telescopes, Italian researchers have found the best evidence yet for the seeds that ultimately grow into these cosmic giants. (2016-05-24)

Russia-China: History and culture
2017 is an anniversary year for all Russian sinologists. In the approaching 2017 Russian academic Oriental Studies will turn 200 years, and it will be 180 years since formation of first department of Chinese verbal folklore in Kazan Imperial University; 60 years since foundation of Russian-Chinese friendship Community and 10 years since foundation of Confucius Institute of Kazan (Volga Region) Federal University (CI KFU). (2016-12-17)

Experts highlight ebola vaccine progress and suggest next steps
Despite promising advances, important scientific questions remain unanswered in the effort to develop a safe and effective Ebola vaccine, according to members of an international Ebola research consortium. In a Viewpoint published in The Lancet, the experts review the current field of Ebola vaccine candidates and clinical trials and highlight key gaps in knowledge that need to be addressed by future research. (2018-08-10)

Doctor-affiliated PACs fund political candidates who oppose firearm safety policies
Researchers found that physician-affiliated political action committees provided more financial support to candidates who opposed increased background checks, contrary to many societies' recommendations for evidence-based policies to reduce firearm injuries. (2019-02-22)

Could drugs replace gastric bypass surgery?
Gastric bypass surgery is one of the most successful treatments for obesity and related disorders; however, some patients may not want to undergo surgery. In an attempt to reduce nutrient absorption and replicate the effects of gastric bypass surgery, researchers screened for inhibitors of an amino acid transporter, called B0AT1, and discovered a number of agents -- including benztropine, a drug that is already in clinical use -- as promising candidates. (2017-02-08)

Insect antibiotic provides new way to eliminate bacteria
An antibiotic called thanatin attacks the way the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is built. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now found out that this happens through a previously unknown mechanism. Thanatin, produced naturally by the spined soldier bug, can therefore be used to develop new classes of antibiotics. (2018-11-15)

Computer-designed vaccine elicits potent antibodies against RSV
A first-of-its-kind nanoparticle vaccine candidate for respiratory syncytial virus, a major cause of infant mortality worldwide, has been developed through computer design. Animal tests suggest the vaccine could provide potent, durable protection against RSV. The vaccine is being further developed for possible clinical trials. The nanoparticle platform will also be used to design potential vaccines for AIDS, hepatitis C and cancer. (2019-03-07)

Mass vaccinations will not prevent Ebolavirus outbreaks, new research shows
Prophylactic mass vaccination programmes are not a realistic option in the battle to prevent new Ebolavirus outbreaks, a University of Kent-led research team has shown. (2018-05-09)

Voters make choices based on looks -- but this doesn't help them pick the best politicians
New research, thought to be the the first of its kind, measures the impact of appearance and personality on voting and political performance. (2018-04-30)

Nearly 80 exoplanet candidates identified in record time
Scientists at MIT and elsewhere have analyzed data from K2, the follow-up mission to NASA's Kepler Space Telescope, and have discovered a trove of possible exoplanets amid some 50,000 stars. In a paper that appears online today in The Astronomical Journal, the scientists report the discovery of nearly 80 new planetary candidates, including a particular standout: a likely planet that orbits the star HD 73344, which would be the brightest planet host ever discovered by the K2 mission. (2018-06-21)

Study offers comprehensive roadmap for regulating political activity by nonprofits
Lloyd Hitoshi Mayer's comprehensive approach yields surprising and controversial solutions, beginning with the creation of a simple and broad definition of political activity that charities will be prohibited from engaging in. (2019-06-05)

Some cancer drugs in clinical trials don't work by hitting their targets
Multiple cancer drug candidates in clinical trials kill tumor cells through off-target effects instead of by interacting with their intended molecular targets, according to a new study. (2019-09-11)

First-of-its-kind study finds loss of local media worsens political polarization
Changes to the media environment have increased polarized voting in America through both addition and subtraction. We argue that the decline of local newspapers has contributed to the nationalization of American politics: as local newspapers close, Americans rely more heavily on available national news or partisan heuristics to make political decisions. (2018-11-20)

Early in vitro testing for adverse effects on embryos
ETH researchers have combined embryonic cells and liver cells in a new cell culture test. This combination lets them detect adverse effects that new medications may have on embryos early on in the drug development process. (2019-05-14)

New approaches in medical genomics: A step forward in Parkinson's disease
Researchers at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) in Barcelona have discovered a mechanism regulating an important protein that is linked to ParkinsonĀ“s disease and multiple system atrophy (MSA). They have identified factors controlling the production of this protein and revealed mechanisms by which it leads to neurotoxicity. These results, which have been published this week in Nucleic Acids Research, point to new biomarkers that might help in the early detection of these diseases, as well as in exploring possible treatments. (2017-12-19)

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