Popular Carbohydrates News and Current Events

Popular Carbohydrates News and Current Events, Carbohydrates News Articles.
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The genes are not to blame
Individualized dietary recommendations based on genetic information are currently a popular trend. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has systematically analyzed scientific articles and reached the following conclusion: There is no clear evidence for the effect of genetic factors on the consumption of total calories, carbohydrates, and fat. According to the current state of knowledge, the expedience of gene-based dietary recommendations has yet to be proven. (2018-07-20)

Carbs during workouts help immune system recovery
Eating carbohydrates during intense exercise helps to minimise exercise-induced immune disturbances and can aid the body's recovery, QUT research has found. (2017-02-15)

UTEP team advances in developing vaccine for cutaneous leishmaniasis
A research team at The University of Texas at El Paso is one step closer to developing an effective human vaccine for cutaneous leishmaniasis. During the team's more than four years of research at UTEP's Border Biomedical Research Center, they discovered a vaccine formulation that resulted in a 96 percent decrease in the lesions caused by the illness and showed an 86 percent protection rate from the disease in mice. (2017-11-15)

Making oil from algae -- towards more efficient biofuels
The mechanism behind oil synthesis within microalgae cells has been revealed by a Japanese research team. This discovery could contribute to the development of biofuels. The findings were published on April 4 in Scientific Reports. (2017-04-18)

Novel technique helps ID elusive molecules
Stuart Lindsay, a researcher at Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute, has devised a clever means of identifying carbohydrate molecules quickly and accurately. The results of his research, which appear in the current issue of Nature Communications, pave the way for a new generation of analytic tools capable of ferreting out carbohydrates for diagnosis and eventual treatment of many diseases. (2016-12-21)

Otago study first to report benefits and safety of FODMAP diet in children
The low FODMAP diet, a diet low in carbohydrates that trigger digestive symptoms like bloating and stomach pain, is a useful treatment in children and adolescents with gastrointestinal problems, new University of Otago research confirms. (2019-09-23)

High-fiber diets, with aid from gut microbes, can help treat type 2 diabetes
Scientists have identified a 'guild' of gut bacteria that helped alleviate symptoms of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in patients eating a high-fiber diet. The authors say that promoting this exclusive microbial group via personalized nutrition may serve as a novel approach for maintaining the beneficial relationship between the body and its microbiome during T2DM. (2018-03-08)

Study shows that a high protein intake in early childhood is associated with higher body fat mass but not higher lean mass
New research presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity (ECO) in Porto, Portugal, May 17-20, shows that a high intake of protein in early childhood, particularly from animal food sources, is associated with a higher body mass index (BMI) due to increased body fat and not increases in fat-free mass. (2017-05-19)

Mice study implicates fat as obesity cause
Scientists at the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology found that only eating high levels of dietary fat makes you fat. They have performed the largest study of its kind to resolve what components of the diet cause mice to put on body fat. (2018-07-13)

The Lancet Public Health: Moderate carbohydrate intake may be best for health
Low-carb diets that replace carbohydrates with proteins and fats from plant sources associated with lower risk of mortality compared to those that replace carbohydrates with proteins and fat from animal sources. (2018-08-16)

Mechanism for photosynthesis already existed in primeval microbe
A Japanese research team has discovered an evolutionary model for the biological function that creates CO2 from glucose in photosynthesis. They found the mechanism in a primitive, non-photosynthesizing microbe. (2017-01-31)

Blood donors' leftover immune cells reveal secrets of antibody affinity
Researchers at Iowa State University, partnering with the LifeServe Blood Center, have gained crucial insights into how natural killer cells circulating in the human body differ from those typically studied in the lab. The results of this research are published in the March 9 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry. (2018-03-09)

A fat belly is bad for your heart
Belly fat, even in people who are not otherwise overweight, is bad for the heart, according to results from the Mayo Clinic presented today at EuroPrevent 2018, a European Society of Cardiology congress. (2018-04-20)

Learning about nutrition from 'food porn' and online quizzes
Harvard and Columbia researchers designed an online experiment to test how people learn about nutrition in the context of a social, online quiz. (2017-05-24)

Whole grains one of the most important food groups for preventing type 2 diabetes
It doesn't matter if it's rye, oats, or wheat. As long as it is whole grain, it can prevent type 2 diabetes. This is the finding of a new study from researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, and the Danish Cancer Society Research Center. The comprehensive study is a strong confirmation of previous research findings on the importance of whole grains for prevention of type 2 diabetes. (2018-09-05)

Which targeted nutritional approaches can bolster micro-preemies' brain development?
The volume of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids and calories consumed by very vulnerable preemies significantly contributes to increased brain volume and white matter development, however additional research is needed to determine specific nutritional approaches that best support these infants' developing brains, according to research to be presented during the Pediatric Academic Societies 2018 annual meeting. (2018-05-05)

Future for clean energy lies in 'big bang' of evolution
Amid mounting agreement that future clean, (2008-08-25)

Nutrition Today publishes expert commentary on high-quality carbohydrates and physical performance
A report about high-quality carbohydrates and physical performance was recently released in the peer-reviewed journal Nutrition Today. The report focuses on commentary that took place during an expert panel. The results of the report suggest that balanced diets high in natural, carbohydrate-rich foods, including nutrient-dense potatoes, may be optimal for improving performance among elite endurance athletes. (2018-01-08)

Study suggests pasta can be part of a healthy diet without packing on the pounds
Carbohydrates get a lot of bad press and blame for the obesity epidemic, but a new study suggests that this negative attention may not be deserved for pasta. (2018-04-03)

Dietary fat is good? Dietary fat is bad? Coming to consensus
Which is better, a low-fat/high-carbohydrate diet or a high-fat/low-carbohydrate diet -- or is it the type of fat that matters? In a new paper featured on the cover of Science magazine's special issue on nutrition, researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston Children's Hospital, and colleagues with diverse expertise and perspectives on the issues laid out the case for each position and came to a consensus and a future research agenda. (2018-11-15)

On the keto diet? Ditch the cheat day, says UBC study
The often embraced 'cheat day' is a common theme in many diets and the popular ketogenic diet is no exception. But new research from UBC's Okanagan campus says that just one 75-gram dose of glucose -- the equivalent a large bottle of soda or a plate of fries -- while on a high fat, low carbohydrate diet can lead to damaged blood vessels. (2019-03-27)

Carbohydrates may be the key to a better malaria vaccine
An international research team has shown for the first time that carbohydrates on the surface of malaria parasites play a critical role in malaria's ability to infect mosquito and human hosts. The discovery also suggests steps that may improve the only malaria vaccine approved to protect people against Plasmodium falciparum malaria -- the most deadly form of the disease. (2017-09-15)

Sugars in some breast milk could help protect babies from group B strep
Group B strep bacteria remain the leading cause of severe infections in newborns worldwide. Now researchers have found that although the pathogen can be transmitted to infants through breastfeeding, some mothers produce protective sugars in their milk that could help prevent infection and fight biofilm formation -- the first example of carbohydrates in human milk having this function. The researchers are presenting their results at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. (2017-08-20)

New review shows plant-based diets benefit athletes' heart health, endurance, recovery
A new scientific review published in the journal Nutrients provides evidence that plant-based athletes benefit from improvements in heart health, performance, and recovery. (2019-01-10)

A weak heart due to metabolic change
The heart derives its energy primarily from fatty acids. However, if a metabolic shift to other energy sources takes place, this can result in congestive heart failure, scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and Heidelberg University Hospital have now discovered. This underscores the role of metabolism in heart failure. In addition, these findings are relevant for the use of certain anticancer drugs. (2018-01-23)

The body's own fat-metabolism protects against the harmful effects of sugar
Researchers at Aarhus University, Denmark, have discovered that the fat-metabolism in the cells takes place simultaneously with a detoxification of the harmful substances from the blood sugar, which can avert the damage that can in turn lead to age-related diseases such as diabetes, Alzheimer's and cancer. This indicates that we have a detoxification system which we were not previously aware of. (2017-09-15)

Meat consumption contributing to global obesity
Should we be warning consumers about over-consumption of meat as well as sugar? (2016-08-01)

Nut consumption may aid colon cancer survival
People with stage III colon cancer who regularly eat nuts are at significantly lower risk of cancer recurrence and mortality than those who don't, according to a new, large study led by researchers at Yale Cancer Center. (2018-02-28)

TSRI professor named industry pioneer in one of the top ten technologies that will change future
The Scripps Research Institute today announced that Professor James Paulson, Ph.D., has been chosen as a global leader in the field of glycomics by Technology Review, The Massachusetts Institute of Technology's magazine of innovation. The magazine's February 2003 issue identifies ten emerging technologies it says will change the world. It is on newsstands January 21 and online now at http://www.technologyreview.com/articles/emerging0203.asp. (2003-01-08)

Nutrition is key to increasing productivity in intensive breeding
Carbohydrates, which have been progressively employed in intensive breeding, induces the fermentation that leads to the development of acidosis, the second most important health problem in feedlot cattle according to nutritionists. Scientists test additives on the feed capable of controlling the bacteria involved in fermentation. (2017-09-29)

Sugars in human mother's milk are new class of antibacterial agents
A new study has found that sugars in mother's' milk do not just provide nutrition for babies but also help protect them from bacterial infections, making them a new class of antimicrobial agent. (2017-08-20)

Study: Viruses support photosynthesis in bacteria -- an evolutionary advantage?
Viruses propagate by infecting a host cell and reproducing inside. This not only affects humans and animals, but bacteria as well. This type of virus is called bacteriophage. They carry so called auxiliary metabolic genes in their genome, which are responsible for producing certain proteins that give the virus an advantage. Researchers at the University of Kaiserslautern and the Ruhr University Bochum have analysed the structure of such a protein more closely. (2017-02-23)

New TSRI method accelerates studies on carbohydrate biology
The breakthrough may expand research on the roles of glycans in human diseases, including cancers. (2018-02-28)

Lazy snakes! Pythons can be couch potatoes, too
A team of California researchers have studied factors associated with pythons digestion, assimilation and execretion of certain foods. Study shows that their energy stores are based more on what they eat than how much they eat. (2002-08-26)

Fossil fuel formation: Key to atmosphere's oxygen?
For the development of animals, nothing -- with the exception of DNA -- may be more important than oxygen in the atmosphere. (2016-12-30)

Research shows dogs prefer to eat fat, and cats surprisingly tend toward carbs
Dogs gravitate toward high-fat food, but cats pounce on carbohydrates with even greater enthusiasm, according to research into the dietary habits of America's two most popular pets. (2018-06-05)

Algal residue -- an alternative carbon resource for pharmaceuticals and polyesters
Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology found that algal residue, the leftover material after extracting oil from algae for biofuel, can be used to produce key industrial chemicals. (2017-04-12)

Study explores carbohydrates' impact on head, neck cancers
Consuming high amounts of carbohydrates and various forms of sugar during the year prior to treatment for head and neck cancer may increase patients' risks of cancer recurrence and mortality, a new study reports. However, eating moderate amounts of fats and starchy foods such as whole grains, potatoes and legumes after treatment could have protective benefits, reducing patients' risks of disease recurrence and death, said lead author Anna E. Arthur, a professor of food science and human nutrition at the University of Illinois. (2018-04-12)

How plants are working hard for the planet
As the planet warms, plants are working to slow the effect of human-caused climate change -- and research published today in Trends in Plant Science has assessed how plants are responding to increasing carbon dioxide (CO2). (2019-05-16)

Fruit fly study challenges theories on evolution and high-carb diets
UNSW fruit fly research challenges neutral theory of molecular evolution and suggests one day we may be prescribed diets according to our genes. (2018-10-26)

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