Popular Carbon Cycle News and Current Events

Popular Carbon Cycle News and Current Events, Carbon Cycle News Articles.
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Sources and sinks
For the entire history of our species, humans have lived on a planet capped by a chunk of ice at each pole. But Earth has been ice-free for about 75 percent of the time since complex life first appeared. This variation in background climate, between partly glaciated and ice-free, has puzzled geologists for decades. (2019-03-14)

Storage wars
One answer to our greenhouse gas challenges may be right under our feet: Soil scientists Oliver Chadwick of UC Santa Barbara and Marc Kramer of Washington State University have found that minerals in soil can hold on to a significant amount of carbon pulled from the atmosphere. It's a mechanism that could potentially be exploited as the world tries to shift its carbon economy. (2019-01-02)

Methods and models
It's a well-known fact that the ocean is one of the biggest absorbers of the carbon dioxide emitted by way of human activity. What's less well known is how the ocean's processes for absorbing that carbon change over time, and how they might affect its ability to buffer climate change. (2019-06-19)

Nano-saturn
Saturn is the second largest planet in our solar system and has a characteristic ring. Japanese researchers have now synthesized a molecular 'nano-Saturn'. As the scientists report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, it consists of a spherical C(60) fullerene as the planet and a flat macrocycle made of six anthracene units as the ring. The structure is confirmed by spectroscopic and X-ray analyses. (2018-06-08)

MIT engineers develop a new way to remove carbon dioxide from air
A new way of removing carbon dioxide from a stream of air could provide a significant tool in the battle against climate change. The new system can work on the gas at virtually any concentration level, even down to the roughly 400 parts per million currently found in the atmosphere. (2019-10-25)

The science behind the fizz: How the bubbles make the beverage
From popping a bottle of champagne for a celebration to cracking open a soda while watching the Super Bowl, everyone is familiar with fizz. But little is known about the chemistry behind the bubbles. Now, one group sheds some light on how carbonation can affect the creaminess and smoothness of beverages, as reported in ACS' The Journal of Physical Chemistry B. (2018-01-31)

Early Earth haze may have spurred life, says University of Colorado study
Hazy skies on early Earth could have provided a substantial source of organic material useful for emerging life on the planet, according to a new study led by the University of Colorado at Boulder. (2006-11-06)

Charcoal remains could accelerate CO2 emissions after forest fires
Charcoal remains after a forest fire help decompose fine roots in the soil, potentially accelerating CO2 emissions in boreal forests. (2017-12-28)

Plant respiration could become a bigger feedback on climate than expected
New research suggests that plant respiration is a larger source of carbon emissions than previously thought, and warns that as the world warms, this may reduce the ability of Earth's land surface to absorb emissions due to fossil fuel burning. (2017-11-17)

Team discovers a significant role for nitrate in the Arctic landscape
Because of the very low nitrate levels found in arctic tundra soil, scientists had assumed that plants in this biome do not use nitrate. But a new study co-authored by four Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) Ecosystems Center scientists challenges this notion. The study has important implications for predicting which arctic plant species will dominate as the climate warms, as well as how much carbon tundra ecosystems can store. (2018-03-23)

How seafloor weathering drives the slow carbon cycle
A previously unknown connection between geological atmospheric carbon dioxide cycles and the fluctuating capacity of the ocean crust to store carbon dioxide has been uncovered by two geoscientists from the University of Sydney. Better understanding of the slow carbon cycle will help us predict to what extent the continents, oceans and ocean crust will take up the extra human-induced rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide in the long run. (2018-02-14)

Record high CO2 emissions delay global peak
Global carbon emissions are on the rise again in 2017 after three years of little to no growth, according to University of East Anglia researcher. Global emissions from all human activities will reach 41 billion tonnes in 2017, following a projected 2 percent rise in burning fossil fuels. It was hoped that emissions might soon reach their peak after three stable years, so this is unwelcome news for those at the UN Climate Change Conference (COP 23), Bonn. (2017-11-13)

New chemical method could revolutionize graphene
University of Illinois at Chicago scientists have discovered a new chemical method that enables graphene to be incorporated into a wide range of applications while maintaining its ultra-fast electronics. (2017-06-14)

Reconstruction of major North Atlantic circulation system shows weakening
Rising levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere have affected one of the global ocean's major circulation systems, the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), slowing the redistribution of heat in the North Atlantic Ocean. The resulting changes have been felt along the Northeast US Shelf and in the Gulf of Maine, which has warmed 99 percent faster than the global ocean over the past ten years, impacting distributions of fish and other species and their prey. (2018-04-11)

Researchers detail carbon output from rivers and streams
Scientists have demonstrated that while most CO2 emitted from small streams is derived from surrounding soils, in-stream respiration becomes a larger proportion of CO2 emissions as rivers become larger. (2015-08-13)

'Green' taxes
A comparative analysis has shown that 'indirect' instruments, such as excise taxes on motor fuel and other energy taxes, did not yield any lesser impact than their 'direct' counterparts, and, over time, were even more effective. This is the conclusion drawn by Ilya Stepanov, researcher at the Higher School of Economics, in his article, 'Taxes in the Energy Sector and Their Role in Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions'. (2019-08-01)

Small but versatile
The ammonia oxidizing archaea, or Thaumarchaeota, are amongst the most abundant marine microorganisms. Yet, we are still discovering which factors allow them to thrive in the ocean: A new publication reveals that marine Thaumarchaeota have a broader metabolism than previously thought. (2018-12-10)

New design produces true lithium-air battery
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago and at Argonne National Laboratory have designed a new lithium-air battery that works in a natural-air environment and still functioned after a record-breaking 750 charge/discharge cycles. Their findings are reported in the journal Nature. (2018-03-21)

Solar minimum surprisingly constant
Using more than half a century of observations, Japanese astronomers have discovered that the microwaves coming from the Sun at the minimums of the past five solar cycles have been the same each time, despite large differences in the maximums of the cycles. This is an important step in understanding the creation and amplification of solar magnetic fields, which generate sunspots and other solar activity. (2017-11-16)

Tiny microbes make a surprisingly big contribution to carbon release
As erosion eats away at Earth's surface, some types of rocks release carbon they contain back into the atmosphere -- and now a new study suggests that microbes play a substantial role in this release. (2018-04-12)

New record set for carbon-carbon single bond length
A stable organic compound has been synthesized with a record length for the bond between its carbon atoms, exceeding the assumed limit. (2018-03-08)

How a 'shadow zone' traps the world's oldest ocean water
New research from an international team has revealed why the oldest water in the ocean in the North Pacific has remained trapped in a shadow zone around 2km below the sea surface for over 1000 years. (2017-11-10)

Land restoration in Latin America shows big potential for climate change mitigation
Land restoration in Latin America and the Caribbean is picking up pace and scaling up projects will help the region meet its pledges under the Bonn Challenge, which aims to restore 350 million hectares of degraded and deforested land worldwide by 2030. A new study supplies a first map of restoration projects in Latin America and shows their potential to mitigate climate change through restoring forests. (2019-09-13)

New type of nanowires, built with natural gas heating
A new simple, cost-effective approach that may open up an effective way to make other metallic/semiconducting nanomaterials. (2016-01-30)

New principles to guide corporate investment towards climate goals
A new set of principles are needed to address the moral challenge of climate change. These principles, developed by a team of researchers at the Oxford Martin School, and published this week in Nature Climate Change, are a set of scientifically-grounded tools for the use of both investors and companies to assess corporate strategy against climate change. (2018-01-04)

The critical importance of mangroves to ocean life
Mangrove plants, whose finger-like roots are known to protect coastal wetlands against the ocean and as important fish habitats, cover less than 0.1 percent of the global land surface yet account for a tenth of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) that flows from land to the ocean. The plants are one of the main sources of dissolved organic matter in the ocean. (2006-02-27)

Carbon feedback from forest soils will accelerate global warming, 26-year study projects
After 26 years, the world's longest-running experiment to discover how warming temperatures affect forest soils has revealed a surprising, cyclical response: Soil warming stimulates periods of abundant carbon release from the soil to the atmosphere alternating with periods of no detectable loss in soil carbon stores. The study, led by Jerry Melillo of the Marine Biological Laboratory, indicates that in a warming world, a self-reinforcing and perhaps uncontrollable carbon feedback will occur between forest soils and the climate system, accelerating global warming. (2017-10-05)

Research highlights ethical sourcing of materials for modern technology
Researchers from the Camborne School of Mines have identified methods to predict the environmental and social cost of resourcing new deposits of rare earth minerals used in the production of mobile phones, wind turbines and electric vehicles. (2017-11-10)

Climate game changer
New research from University of Alberta and University of Vienna microbiologists provides unparalleled insight into the Earth's nitrogen cycle, identifying and characterizing the ammonia-oxidizing microbe, Nitrospira inopinata. (2017-08-23)

Consumers care about carbon footprint
How much do consumers care about the carbon footprint of the products they buy? Would they care more if the goods were labeled with emissions data? Does it matter at which stage in the lifecycle of a product the carbon is emitted? Research published in the International Journal of Environmental Policy and Decision Making offers a way to find out. (2016-02-26)

Adding hydrogen to graphene
IBS researchers report a fundamental study of how graphene is hydrogenated. (2016-11-03)

Growing and surviving: How proteins regulate the cell cycle
Cell division is the basis of all life. Even the smallest errors in this complex process can lead to grave diseases like cancer. Certain proteins have to be switched on or off at certain times for everything to go according to plan. Biophysicists and medical biochemists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have managed to describe the underlying mechanism of this process. (2018-03-23)

Hydrogen in your pocket? New plastic for carrying and storing hydrogen
A Waseda University research group has developed a polymer which can store hydrogen in a light, compact and flexible sheet, and is safe to touch even when filled with hydrogen gas. (2016-11-28)

First-ever US experiments at new X-ray facility may lead to better explosive modeling
For the first time in the US, time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering (TRSAXS) is used to observe ultra-fast carbon clustering and graphite and nanodiamond production in the insensitive explosive Plastic Bonded Explosive (PBX) 9502, potentially leading to better computer models of explosive performance. (2017-11-06)

Agricultural science helping farmers reduce greenhouse gas
With greenhouse gas reduction increasingly on the public agenda, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada researchers say agricultural science may be part of the solution. (2002-12-17)

Plant cells survive but stop dividing upon DNA damage
The cell cycle is how a cell passes its DNA but ceases if the DNA is damaged, as otherwise it risks passing this damage to daughter cells. Scientists at the Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) report a new molecular mechanism that explains how this cessation occurs. The study shows that the transcription factor family MYB3R is normally degraded, but accumulates upon DNA damage to prevent cell cycle progression. (2017-10-06)

Swansea scientists discover greener way of making plastics
A new catalyst that allows for the conversion of the green house gas carbon dioxide to an industrial precursor for many plastics has been developed by scientists in the Energy Safety Research Institute at Swansea University as an alternative to using petroleum raw materials. (2018-04-11)

New Pd-based initiating systems for C1 polymerization of diazoacetates
Two new Pd-based initiating systems for C1 polymerization of diazoacetates were reported: Pd(nq)2/borate (nq = naphthoquinone, borate = NaBPh4) and [Pd(cod)(Cl-nq)Cl/borate] [cod = 1,5-cyclooctadiene, Cl-nq = 2,3-dichloro-1,4-naphthoquinone]. The former exhibited high activity, affording poly(alkoxycarbonylmethylene)s with high molecular weights in high yields. The latter was effective for controlling the stereostructure of the resulting polymers. (2019-10-23)

Assessing carbon capture technology
Carbon capture and storage could be used to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and thus ameliorate their impact on climate change. The focus of this technology is on the large-scale reduction of carbon emissions from fossil-fuelled power plants. Research published in the International Journal of Decision Support Systems investigates the pros and cons, assesses the risks associated with carbon capture and provides a new framework for assessing the necessary technology. (2016-02-17)

Highly efficient photocatalyst capable of carbon dioxide recycling
A research team from Korea has developed titanium dioxide-based photocatalyst with the highest efficiency in the world that converts carbon dioxide into methane. The result is expected to be applied to technologies to reduce and reuse carbon dioxide. (2017-12-01)

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